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Phraseology in Corpus-Based Translation Studies

Ji, Meng

Phraseology in Corpus-Based Translation Studies

Series: New Trends in Translation Studies - Volume 1

Year of Publication: 2010

Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien, 2010. XX, 231 pp., num. tables and graphs
ISBN 978-3-03911-550-1 pb.  (Softcover)

Weight: 0.370 kg, 0.816 lbs

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Book synopsis

Translations of Cervantes’ Don Quijote (1605) take pride of place among foreign literature in China. Despite the contrasts between the two cultures and the passage of four centuries the adventures and misadventures of the Castilian hero have always been popular with Chinese readers.
In this book a corpus-based stylistic study is used to explore two contemporary Mandarin Chinese translations of Don Quijote: those by Yang Jiang (1978) and Liu Jingsheng (1995). Utilising a micro-structural perspective this study suggests explanations for the surprising popularity of Don Quijote in China.

Contents

Contents: Construction of a Parallel Corpus of Don Quijote – Corpus Data Retrieval and Annotation – Phraseological Patterns in Yang’s Translation – Phraseological Patterns in Liu’s Translation – Use of Figurative/Archaic Idioms in the Two Translations – Quantitative Exploration of Style Variation in Liu’s Translation.

About the author(s)/editor(s)

The Author: Meng Ji has a Ph.D. from Imperial College London (2009) within the area of corpus-based translation studies focused on the study of phraseology in literary translations into Chinese. She is presently developing an interdisciplinary approach to corpus-based translation studies by integrating methodologies from disciplines including textual statistics, quantitative sociolinguistics and computational stylometry.

Series

New Trends in Translation Studies. Vol. 1
Edited by Jorge Díaz Cintas