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Medical Humanities

Criticism and Creativity

Edited by Maria Vaccarella and Kimberly R. Myers

This series showcases innovative research, creativity and pedagogy in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Books in the series explore the complexities of human bodies, minds, illness and wellbeing through analytical frameworks derived from humanistic disciplines and clinical practice. The series is intended to provide an informative exchange across disciplines, contributing to debates on health-related issues from a broad range of perspectives. In addition to research monographs and edited collections, the series includes creative works as well as pedagogical texts, thus encouraging personal and theoretical reflections on the condition of the human mind/body. The series embraces the intersection of healthcare and the humanities, in its practical, theoretical, creative and educational expressions.

The series serves as a venue for publishing a range of materials: research monographs and edited collections on critical approaches to medical issues in culture; creative works that engage with medical humanities themes, accompanied by critical and educational materials; and critical, engaged or radical pedagogies on focused topics and/or for learners in the medical humanities. The series also invites research that opens up critical conversations on being human at the intersection of other forms of new humanistic knowledge, such as environmental or digital humanities. We are especially interested in collaborations between academics in the humanities and healthcare professionals.

All book proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed prior to publication. We publish in both print and electronic format. Open Access publication is particularly welcome.

Editorial Board: Havi Carel (University of Bristol), Gretchen Case (University of Utah School of Medicine), Siobhan Conaty (La Salle University), Cheryl Dellasega (Penn State College of Medicine), Daniel George (Penn State College of Medicine), Michael Green (Penn State College of Medicine), Jennifer Henneman (Denver Art Museum), Brian Hurwitz (King’s College London), Brian Johnsrud (Khan Academy), Tess Jones (University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus), Lois Leveen (Novelist and independent scholar), Ulrika Maude (University of Bristol), Gavin Miller (University of Glasgow), Jules Odendahl-James (Duke University), Molly Osborne (Oregon Health and Science University), Barry Saunders (University of North Carolina School of Medicine), Johanna Shapiro (University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine), Marina Tsaplina (The Betes Organization), Craigan Usher (Oregon Health and Science University), Neil Vickers (King’s College London), Martin Wills (Cardiff University), Charlotte Wu (Boston University School of Medicine)

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Breast Cancer Unbound

Bodies, Biographies, & Beliefs

Edited by Kimberly R. Myers

Forthcoming
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Dafydd Sills-Jones, Jouko Aaltonen and Pietari Kaapa

Forthcoming
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Edited by Marina Calleja Reina and Encarnación Postigo Pinazo

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Giving with an Agenda

How New Philanthropy Advocates for the Corporate Reform of Education

Marina Avelar

Forthcoming
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Edited by Caroline Archer-Parré, Malcolm Dick and John Hinks

This series unites the allied fields of printing history and print culture, and is therefore concerned not only with the design, production and distribution of printed material but also its consumption, reception and impact. It includes the histories of the machinery and equipment, of the industry and its personnel, of the printing processes, the design of its artefacts (books, newspapers, journals, fine prints, and ephemera) and with the related arts and crafts, including calligraphy, type-founding, typography, papermaking, bookbinding, illustration, and publishing. It also covers the cultural context and environment in which print was produced and consumed.

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Mosquitoes management

Between environmental and health issues

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Edited by Cécilia Claeys

This edited volume focuses on contemporary developments in mosquito control policies. It is premised on the idea that, in view of the social and ecological changes of recent decades, effective management of vector mosquitoes calls for a break with the old North/South, environment/health dualisms. Increasing urbanization and climate change encourage the proliferation of vector mosquitoes and expand their range of distribution. Globalization and the accelerated flow of human beings, insect vectors and viruses are increasing epidemic risks.

In the North, populations are now exposed to emerging or re-emerging epidemic risks (dengue fever, chikungunya, zika, etc.; malaria). However, comfort-based mosquito control techniques designed predominantly to reduce a nuisance have proven ineffective against vector mosquitoes. In the South, social acceptance of large-scale insecticide spraying is waning. Ecological concerns are voiced with growing insistence, denouncing a cure that can be worse than the disease. Reliance on chemical control appears even less desirable as its effectiveness declines due to increasing insecticide resistance among mosquitoes. Meanwhile, genetic engineering is still in the trial and error phase and raises new ethical questions.

The changes studied here are socio-environmental. To understand them, this volume proposes a dialogue between sociology, geography, entomology, epidemiology and ecology based on several study areas in Africa, the Indian Ocean, America and Europe. These analyses show that the relationships between human societies and mosquitoes are more deeply enmeshed than ever, as if caught in a duel that is still all too often fatal.

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Edited by Anthony J. Nocella II, Sean Parson, Amber E. George and Stephanie Eccles

As the inevitable, unsustainable nature of contemporary society becomes increasingly more obvious, it is important for scholars and activists to engage with the question, "what is to be done?" This anthology provides an analysis and overview of an under-discussed but important part of the radical environmental movement, the Earth Liberation Front, which actively tried to stop ecocide. Through an engagement with the activism and thought behind the ELF, contributors to the volume encourage the reader to begin questioning the nature of contemporary capitalism, the state, and militarism. The book also explores the social movement and tactical impact of the ELF, as well as the government response to its activism, in order to strengthen our analytic understanding of effectiveness, resistance, and community resilience. By combining classical and contemporary readings of the ELF movement, this anthology is sure to inspire more resistance and anarchy for decades to come. Social justice advocates, anarchists, environmental justice practitioners, and animal liberationists are just a few segments of the population who will benefit from reading this text.

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Zur Bedeutung von Heimat für ältere Migrantinnen und Migranten

Eine multidisziplinäre und empirische Studie

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Juliane Köchling-Farahwaran

Der Heimatbegriff wird in europäischen Gesellschaften unter dem Einfluss wirtschaftlicher und gesellschaftlicher Entwicklungen, sozialer Mobilität und weltweiter Migration von Menschen auf der Flucht vor Krieg und Armut neu reflektiert und als eine Auseinandersetzung mit der Entwicklung der persönlichen Identität verstanden. Wie bedeutsam die Diskussionen über Heimat und wie unterschiedlich Heimatkonzepte sind, zeigt sich bei den derzeitigen ambivalenten Auseinandersetzungen um die Integration von Migrant*innen. Um die alte Heimat überhaupt in eine neue transformieren zu können, bedarf es der Anerkennung durch die Aufnahmegesellschaft und der Partizipation an dieser. Durch geeignete Konzepte in der Migrationsarbeit kann die Soziale Arbeit einen wesentlichen Beitrag zur Unterstützung leisten.

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Yeats, Otherness and the Orient

Aesthetic and Spiritual Bearings

Nicholas Meihuizen

Yeats’s relationships with Otherness and the Orient enabled him to develop his own creative abilities and spiritual understanding in expansive ways. Exotic versions of India, Celtic orientalism, the fervent psychological probings of the nineteenth century (which showed a deep interest in the paranormal), mystical studies aided by such figures as Mohini Chaterjee, Arabist ideas and images, the Japanese Noh, Zen Buddhism, Byzantium, Vedāntic philosophy – all helped the poet to examine and express human interactions with existence that were distinctive in their figuration and underpinnings. Facing Otherness with an extraordinary philosophical and spiritual intensity, he was able to uncover (though never fully or finally anatomize) aspects of the depths of his own being. The Orient also provided him with conceptual and intuitive means to broach humankind’s relation to cosmic order; this resulted in an exploration of the Otherness which underpins existence on quite a remarkable scale, still not fully appreciated by Yeats’s readers. This book seeks to help foster such appreciation.