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Dafydd Sills-Jones, Jouko Aaltonen and Pietari Kaapa

Forthcoming
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Giving with an Agenda

How New Philanthropy Advocates for the Corporate Reform of Education

Marina Avelar

Forthcoming
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Ian Cawood

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Simon Bennett

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Forthcoming
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Edited by Gregory Castle, Alex Davis and Lee Jenkins

The Global Literary Modernisms series provides a platform for literary scholarship on modernism across genres and geographies. The concept of the global today carries with it new ideas about time and historical development, as well as new theories about national literary traditions and new models of social belonging that extend beyond national borders. Without sacrificing our interest in national traditions, we invite studies that link those traditions to more extensive global and transnational contexts. The series also invites studies that reconsider the temporalities and formal and aesthetic praxes of modernism—not only its historical development, but the peculiar rhythms and pacing of its narratives, its dramatic literatures, its poetry, its song. While respecting the contemporary elasticity of the term, this series understands modernism not simply as a synonym for the ‘modern’ but as a movement that responds to the modern wherever it finds it.

We invite English-language submissions on all aspects of literary modernism. Proposals are invited for monographs and edited volumes that engage transnational and postcolonial, canonical and marginal modernisms, and the legacies of modernism. We welcome single- and multiple-author studies from a variety of approaches and frameworks, literary-historical and/or theoretical.

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Defining Literacy Standards

Essays on Assessment, Inclusion, Pedagogy and Civic Engagement

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Edited by Ronald A. Sudol and Alice S. Horning

As individual institutions of education at all levels respond to the call for greater accountability and assessment, those who teach literacy face the challenging task of choosing what to measure and how to measure it. Both defining literacy clearly and tying that definition to strategies for assessment are two of many challenges faced by educators, theorists, and members of the public who assume responsibility for assessing literacy as well as developing and improving literacy programs. In a pluralistic and democratic society sensitive to multicultural variation, we need to find our way between the competing needs for inclusiveness and for clear and useful standards. Multiple definitions of literacy raise the issue of whether there can be a standard or set of standards and if so, what they are in an environment of multiple literacies. Indeed, the downside of the defeat of older monolithic notions of literacy is the undermining or at least the questioning of well-established methods of literacy assessment. To some extent, the older methods of assessment have been revised in the light of more expansive definitions of literacy. But will this kind of revision be enough? How are the criteria for judgment to be known and applied? Thus, this volume addresses the problems of assessing literacy development in the context of multiple and inclusive definitions. Each section consists of chapters that deal with the issue of definitions per se, with standards in postsecondary settings, with the K-12 situation, and with alternative, non-school environments where literacy is critical to human functioning in a democratic society.

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No! In Whispers

Dissent Rhetoric in US Culture

Edited by Michele Bottalico

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Edited by Europäisches Zentrum für Jüdische Musik and Sarah Ross

The series Jewish Music Studies publishes monographs and edited collections on Jewish music in all its diverse manifestations: from synagogue chants and paraliturgical traditions to the secular/popular music of Jews in various cultural contexts and eras. Books in this series encompass a broad range of subjects with a special focus on music’s use in social, religious and cultural life of Jews around the globe. Topics also include Jewish performers, composers and researchers; Jewish music and migration; Israeli music/music in Israel; Jewish music education; music and ethnicity, gender; and political issues.


Editors' Homepage
ezjm Europäisches Zentrum für Jüdische Musik
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Hip Hop in Urban Borderlands

Music-Making, Identity, and Intercultural Dynamics on the Margins of the Jewish State

Miranda Crowdus

This book explores the role of Hip Hop in negotiating boundaries of identity in contemporary Israel. Hip Hop emerged in Israel in the early 1990s and is performed by many individuals and groups often divided by conflicting aesthetics, ideologies, positionalities, and national identities. Using an ethnographic, interdisciplinary approach, this text highlights the relationships between Jewish and non-Jewish identities operating in South Tel Aviv in grassroots and commercial Hip Hop initiatives. While this book focuses on one urban area, it addresses broader themes relating to popular music and globalization, including the disjuncture between the day-to-day experiences of practitioners and the ideological projections used to define them.