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Breast Cancer Inside Out

Bodies, Biographies, & Beliefs

Edited by Kimberly R. Myers

Forthcoming
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Medical Humanities

Criticism and Creativity

Edited by Maria Vaccarella and Kimberly R. Myers

This series showcases innovative research, creativity and pedagogy in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Books in the series explore the complexities of human bodies, minds, illness and wellbeing through analytical frameworks derived from humanistic disciplines and clinical practice. The series is intended to provide an informative exchange across disciplines, contributing to debates on health-related issues from a broad range of perspectives. In addition to research monographs and edited collections, the series includes creative works as well as pedagogical texts, thus encouraging personal and theoretical reflections on the condition of the human mind/body. The series embraces the intersection of healthcare and the humanities, in its practical, theoretical, creative and educational expressions.

The series serves as a venue for publishing a range of materials: research monographs and edited collections on critical approaches to medical issues in culture; creative works that engage with medical humanities themes, accompanied by critical and educational materials; and critical, engaged or radical pedagogies on focused topics and/or for learners in the medical humanities. The series also invites research that opens up critical conversations on being human at the intersection of other forms of new humanistic knowledge, such as environmental or digital humanities. We are especially interested in collaborations between academics in the humanities and healthcare professionals.

All book proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed prior to publication. We publish in both print and electronic format. Open Access publication is particularly welcome.

Editorial Board: Havi Carel (University of Bristol), Gretchen Case (University of Utah School of Medicine), Siobhan Conaty (La Salle University), Cheryl Dellasega (Penn State College of Medicine), Daniel George (Penn State College of Medicine), Michael Green (Penn State College of Medicine), Jennifer Henneman (Denver Art Museum), Brian Hurwitz (King’s College London), Brian Johnsrud (Khan Academy), Tess Jones (University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus), Lois Leveen (Novelist and independent scholar), Ulrika Maude (University of Bristol), Gavin Miller (University of Glasgow), Jules Odendahl-James (Duke University), Molly Osborne (Oregon Health and Science University), Barry Saunders (University of North Carolina School of Medicine), Johanna Shapiro (University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine), Marina Tsaplina (The Betes Organization), Craigan Usher (Oregon Health and Science University), Neil Vickers (King’s College London), Martin Willis (Cardiff University), Charlotte Wu (Boston University School of Medicine)

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Edited by Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Forthcoming
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Edited by Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Editorial Board: Eleoma Bodammer (Edinburgh), Catalin Brylla (Bournemouth), Colin Cameron (Northumbria), Sally Chivers (Trent, Canada), Eduard Cuelenaere (Ghent), Beth Haller (Towson, USA), Catherine Long, Nicole Marcotić (Windsor), Maria Tsakiri (Cyprus), Dolly Sen, Sonali Shah (Birmingham), Alison Sheldon (Leeds), Angela M. Smith (Utah), Heike Steinhoff (Ruhr-University Bochum), Laura Waite (Liverpool Hope).

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Edited by Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

This series seeks to publish critical and nuanced scholarship in the field of Black European Studies. Moving beyond and building on the Black Atlantic approach, books in this series will underscore the existence, diversity and evolution of Black Europe. They will provide historical, intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives on how Black diasporic peoples have reconfigured the boundaries of Black identity making, claim making and politics; created counterdiscourses and counterpublics on race, colonialism, postcolonialism and racism; and forged transnational connections and solidarities across Europe and the globe. The series will also illustrate the ways that Black European diasporic peoples have employed intellectual, socio-political, artistic/cultural, affective, digital and pedagogical work to aid their communities and causes, challenge their exclusion and cultivate ties with their allies, thus gaining recognition in their societies and beyond.

Representing the field’s dynamic growth methodologically, geographically and culturally, the series will also collectively interrogate notions of Blackness, Black diasporic culture and Europeanness while also challenging the boundaries of Europe. Books in the series will critically examine how race and ethnicity intersect with the themes of gender, nationality, class, religion, politics, kinship, sexuality, affect and the transnational, offering comparative and international perspectives. One of the main goals of the series is to introduce and produce rigorous academic research that connects not only with individuals in academia but also with a broader public.

Areas of interest:

  • Social movements
  • Racial discourses and politics
  • Empire, slavery and colonialism
  • Decolonialization and postcolonialism
  • Gender, sexuality and intersectionality
  • Black activism (in all its forms)
  • Racial and political violence and surveillance
  • Racial constructions
  • Diasporic practices
  • Race and racialization in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary eras
  • Identity, representation and cultural productions (music, art, literature, etc.)
  • Memory
  • Migration and immigration
  • Citizenship
  • State building and diplomacy
  • Nations and nationalisms

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Advisory Board: Hakim Adi (Chichester), Robbie Aitken (Sheffield Hallam), Catherine Baker (Hull), Eddie Bruce-Jones (Birkbeck), Alessandra Di Maio (Palermo), Akwugo Emejulu (Warwick), Philomena Essed (Antioch), Crystal Fleming (Stony Brook), David Theo Goldberg (UC Irvine), Silke Hackenesch (Cologne), Elahe Haschemi Yekani (Humboldt), Nicholas Jones (Bucknell), Silyane Larcher (CNRS), Olivette Otele (Bath Spa), Sue Peabody (Washington State), Kennetta Perry (De Montfort), Cassander L. Smith (Alabama), S. A. Smythe (UCLA)

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Edited by Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

Forthcoming
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Emiliano Javier Cuccia

El estudio de la abstracción ha sido uno de los tópicos más estudiados dentro de la historia del tomismo, donde se la ha interpretado como el término específico que designa el proceso intelectual según el cual el hombre conoce una realidad inteligible partiendo desde los datos sensibles; o bien, mediante el cual capta determinadas características de un objeto sin considerar otras. De un modo particular, la exégesis del siglo XX en adelante añadió sobre esta interpretación un cariz particularmente epistemológico al colocar la abstracción como la causa de la distinción de las ciencias especulativas y sus objetos.

El presente libro tiene como objetivo demostrar que el término posee en Tomás un significado más amplio que el expuesto en tanto es también utilizado en numerosos casos para designar una propiedad de las esencias de las cosas. Esta abstracción de las esencias resulta un elemento clave dentro del corpus metafísico del Aquinate ya que la operación intelectual depende de ella como de su causa formal. De este modo, lo que queda expuesto es el sentido analógico que posee el término abstractio en la obra de Tomás y sus implicancias. A su vez, este descubrimiento se vuelve relevante toda vez que las interpretaciones más difundidas hasta el momento han puesto demasiado énfasis en la faz intelectual dificultando la interpretación de algunos textos importantes.

De esta manera, la obra constituye una pieza importante para avanzar en la comprensión de un tema central en la filosofía tomasiana.

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Dongjing Han

The primary aim of this book is to enhance English as a foreign language (EFL) learners’ listening proficient and provide pedagogical implications for vocabulary and listening teaching practice. This book arouses particular attention to mastery of aural vocabulary knowledge to enhancement of listening performance in Chinese context. It provides a comprehensive picture of the role of vocabulary acquisition approaches and strategy practice in listening performance.

This book evaluates the relationship between vocabulary knowledge and listening comprehension in English as a foreign language (EFL), which has not been sufficiently investigated empirically. In particular, it has an added focus on the use of aural vocabulary knowledge tests in detecting the role of vocabulary knowledge in listening comprehension. It highlights the role of vocabulary knowledge in determining listening success. Specifically, it draws scholars’ attention to the contributions of aural vocabulary knowledge to listening comprehension. The study also confirms the previous hypotheses of higher correlations between aural vocabulary size knowledge and listening comprehension. Pedagogically, it confirms the significance and necessity of improving both aural and written forms of vocabulary knowledge and focusing on strategy-embedded listening activities in EFL listening education. In this book, each chapter is dedicated to a specific theme in EFL learning and acquisition, providing a China case study dedicated to further development of EFL education.

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Series:

William L. Benoit and Andrew C. Billings

Mass communication theories were largely built when we had mass media audiences. The number of television, print, film or other forms of media audiences were largely finite, concentrating people on many of the same core content offerings, whether that be the nightly news or a popular television show. What happens when those audiences splinter? The Rise and Fall of Mass Communication surveys the aftermath of exactly that, noting that very few modern media products have audiences above 1-2% of the population at any one time. Advancing a new media balkanization theory, Benoit and Billings neither lament nor embrace the new media landscape, opting instead to pinpoint how we must consider mass communication theories and applications in an era of ubiquitous choice.

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Edited by Alberto Majocchi

The contributions collected in this volume are linked by a common thread: the development of Africa is a problem that must be faced and solved by the peoples of the continent, with the aim of consolidating democracy and guaranteeing a future of growth and progressive improvement in the quality of life. However, Europe has a role and a responsibility in this process: after having imposed on Africa the model of the bureaucratic and centralized national state, Europe today can represent a model of integration, on the economic field and, in perspective, on the political terrain. Beyond this, Europe must offer a partnership with the African Union to start a Green New Deal for Europe and Africa together, with the allocation of financial resources, but also technology transfers and infrastructure creation. But in this partnership for growth the initiative must be entrusted to African countries, as was the case for Europe in the case of the Marshall Plan. Europe must impose as a sole condition that their plan be drawn up in common and placed in the perspective of strengthening the process of economic and political integration already started on the Continent.