Browse by title

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 4,825 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Series:

Saeed Nazari

In banking education where the focus of curriculum is producing legitimate knowledge to maintain the sociocultural arrangements, the subjectivity of students and teachers is simply taken for granted. Once credentialized, students can find the source of unease within as public education—centered on conformity and competition—has overlooked their individuality. To contribute to their self-understanding and self-love, self-education starts from reconstructing student and teacher educational experiences. Once students and teachers reflect on their educational experience using autobiographical writing, they can reconstruct their understanding of their self and their education. Using emancipatory and transformative writing to liberate self through autobiographical method of Currere, this book takes a psychoanalytical and hermeneutic journey into student and teacher inner world. Once false self gets shattered following the synthetic phase of the method, students and teachers can reconnect to their true self disguised by non-ego—curriculum. As the source of aesthetic creation and inspiration, true self will connect students and teachers to their deeper layers of self-understanding and self-value using which they can recreate their lifeworlds and reconstruct their social and political spheres. Using hermeneutic dialogue following their rebirth, students and teachers will transfer their transformative and liberating understanding of lifeworld to their circumstances to reconstruct education.

Open access

The Expanding Universe of Writing Studies

Higher Education Writing Research

Series:

Cynthia Monroe, Tiane Donahue and Kelly Blewett

This edited collection arrives at a crucial moment in the evolution of Writing Studies research. It brings together well-known and emerging scholars in the field of Writing Studies, broadly defined, to explore the range of research methods and methodologies, the types of research questions asked, and the types of data in play in research about higher education writing in the 21st century. Its contribution is unique in the current landscape—a collection of carefully detailed descriptions of the research methods that constitute the field today, after fifty years of development—as marked by the 50th anniversary of the 1966 Dartmouth Seminar. The chapters focus on writing and writers in higher education, foregrounding research questions, methods, and data, while defining the areas of research that constitute this interdisciplinary field and offering examples of studies that employ the methods in these areas. Initial chapters address broad questions: the state of the field today, with a special focus on the field’s methods and their (inter)disciplinary history. Contributions then cover domains such as sociological ethnography, cultural-historical activity theory, linguistics, decolonial translation, cognitive science, corpus linguistics in the study of writing in university first year and upper-level contexts, recurring features in writing across academic contexts, work from psychologists studying college writers’ neuroplasticity, and many other domains of writing research. The final chapter argues for the value of lifespan writing research as an emerging domain, while the conclusion presents a synthesis of the major themes of the collection from leading scholars in the field.

Restricted access

Susan K. Brondyk and Nancy L. Cook

Changing people’s practice is difficult, shifting the culture of an organization even more so. This book is a description of how one education preparation program did both. This is the story of how they transformed their student teaching program, creating tools and structures that resulted in mentors and student teachers working together in new ways. At the heart of their model is an assessment tool—STAT, for short—used to track the growth and development of student teachers and guide conversations between the college supervisor, cooperating teacher and student teacher. Although this book describes Hope College’s new student teaching model it is really about change. This story takes the reader through the complex change process of one institution, examining the loosely coupled dynamic between leaders and individuals. It describes the natural tension between support and autonomy as program leaders walk alongside individuals as they enact a new practice. This book is intended for teacher educators interested in a developmental model of mentor support, but also for those faced with the daunting task of making changes in their own program. There are lessons learned, however, that go beyond teacher preparation and may serve as a catalyst for others as they engage in their own change process.

Restricted access

Preserving Emotion in Student Writing

Innovation in Composition Pedagogy

Series:

Edited by Craig Wynne

The student-instructor dynamic has become more complex in recent years. Writing instructors, in particular, see the vulnerabilities expressed by students in their writing. This book provides a wide variety of theories and techniques for writing teachers on the integration of emotion into writing instruction. Current writing instructors, as well as students of the craft, can benefit from the ideas and strategies offered by a variety of practitioners in the field. This book includes offerings, such as theories in development, empirical studies, and lesson plans designed to benefit writing instructors and their students.

Restricted access

Series:

Abdín Noboa-Ríos

The year 2011 marked the first time in U.S. history where more nonwhite babies were born than white babies. Academic year 2014-15 marked the first year that K-12 public school enrollment became predominantly nonwhite. Among the five largest school districts, Latinos represent the predominant group. It’s all about a stemming population shift, not immigration, as more Anglo-Americans are dying than those replaced by births.

Meanwhile, our public schools are in trouble, where "normalized failure" has become the new norm and international achievement has reached new lows. In this mix, Latinos are 1-in-3 newborns. As the future of America is now "inextricably linked" to the fate of these children, our educational system must be more responsive or the nation is imperiled.

For this book, Abdín Noboa-Ríos interviewed 112 prominent educators nationwide, including some of the best Hispanic educators and thought leaders to search for answers to America’s educational challenges. What do they say? What do these leaders see? What can we learn? Their many suggestions and concerns are well highlighted. For these leading scholars and practitioners, their views are more about basic renewal, not piecemeal reform. Such action requires fundamental shifts in both mindset and attitude. Appeasement misses the point. We cannot undermine the severity of the problem.

Restricted access

Learning to Disclose

A Journey of Transracial Adoption

Joni Schwartz and Rebecca Schwartz

Joni and Rebecca Schwartz in their collaborative autoethnography, Learning to Disclose: A Journey of Transracial Adoption, are doing soul work. This adult white mother and black daughter reflect and dialogue around the places and histories that shaped their relationship. Through three voices: the voice of critical history, the daughter and the mother, the co-authors excavate the past to see if and how it lives in their present. In an intriguing mix of critical history of places like Port-au-Prince, Haiti and Gulu, Uganda as well as lesser-known narratives of W.E.B. Dubois, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and Shirley Chisholm, the co-authors tell their own personal and moving stories of becoming mother and daughter engaging such topics as racial identity, disclosure, racial appropriation, colonialism, and the complex history of transracial adoption.

For anyone interested in racial identity in the complex world of blended families and adult mother and daughter relationships, this is a must read. This book is ideal for all humanities and social science courses across disciplines from sociology, education, qualitative research, and social work to race and communication studies. In this era of strained and confusing racial dialogue, this book is refreshing in its honesty, moving in its personal narratives, and instructive in its engagement in how the historical lives in the social imagination of our present lives and relationships.

Restricted access

Series:

Otilia Clipa and Erica Cîmpan

Early childhood education is a new & priority of European trends education and a means of increasing the quality of the life. This study aims to provide an analysis of the kindergartens in nature experiences, where children’s lives are conducted in close contact with nature and the outdoor activities in any season and in any weather are an important part of the daily program. These outdoor activities have a significant contribution to social and emotional development of the preschoolers. The concept of kindergartens in nature is an innovative educational concept in which the education for sustainable management and environment has an integrated approach. These activities contribute to the social and emotional development of preschoolers.

Restricted access

Islamic Religious Education in Ireland

Insights and Perspectives

Series:

Youcef Sai

This book is a timely and significant contribution to the growing body of empirical studies in Islamic education but also to the wider public at a time when intercultural understanding is so urgently needed. This invaluable research is of relevance to not only those interested in the world of religions and religious education but also those interested in understanding the dynamics of Muslims and Islam in the West.

—Professor Jenny Berglund, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education, Stockholm University

Islam is the fastest growing religion in Ireland. Given the debate over the role of faith-based schools in secular societies in the twenty - first century, this book provides deeper insight and understanding into the role of ethos and the teaching and learning of Islamic religious knowledge (IRE) in two primary Irish state funded Muslim schools.

Restricted access

Ellen P. McShane

Conquering Trauma and Anxiety to Find Happiness offers trauma victims suffering from anxiety and other disorders freedom from continued emotional suffering. National mental health statistics state 60% of adults, approximately 150,000,000 people, report experiencing trauma. The National Institute of Mental health states 42,000,000 American adults live with an anxiety disorder often resulting from trauma. Through this book’s focus on affect theory and affect labeling, these millions of traumatized and anxious individuals learn to stop living with chronic stress and their reactive, inflexible, and rigid responses to life.

This book offers affect theory as a biological explanation to the consequences of living as a trauma victim by understanding what happened to them and repairing the harm. Affect theory presents nine biologically-coded affects to explain emotion, motivation, behavior, and personality with two positive, one neutral, and six negative affects. Stimulus from our environment activates an affect and its preprogrammed responses within our brain and body. Through facial expressions, along with other physical manifestations, we understand when an affect activates to help us understand our feelings.

Another intervention featured in this book, affect labeling or putting feelings into words, encourages us to focus attention in the present moment to read our body’s sensory information and integrate our brain and mind. Trauma victims understand how therapy provides an important intervention for recovery. An affect management system offers various interventions, such as diet and exercise, to overcome the consequences of trauma and anxiety. We no longer need to suffer if we experience trauma and anxiety.

Restricted access

Religion and Racism

Exploring the Paradox—Can You Be a Christian and a Racist?

Theron N. Ford and Blanche Jackson Glimps

Religion and Racism provides an extensive examination of the paradox that arises from the intersection of being a Christian and a racist. A racist believes that one racial group is superior to another. Yet, since the nation’s revolutionary birth, the United States claims a pious, devout mantle of Christianity that served as the nation’s moral compass, while engaging in horrendous acts of racial violence. How can a white Christian male, sit in a church, engage in Christian prayers, and then in cold-blooded fashion murder nine African American Christians in their own church? Christians traditionally have always designated "churches" as places of refuge and sanctuary. The binary of whiteness and Christianity emerged and came to dominate much of the world. In the United States and other parts of the world, whiteness and Christianity have served to subjugate people of color even as such people themselves also came to embrace Christ's teachings, often at the cost of the loss of their traditional forms of religion and culture. Armed with the Bible and deep-seated belief in racial superiority, European colonizers came to shape most of the world as we know it today. The result has been an unequal control of the world’s resources and vastly disparate living standards for people of color and whites, both internationally and within specific nations. People of color have been treated as highly valued commodities, while simultaneously being stripped of their humanity—with the sanction of the Christian faith.