Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • All content x
  • Future Publications x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Edited by Alison Wilde

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Editorial Board: Eleoma Bodammer (Edinburgh), Catalin Brylla (Bournemouth), Colin Cameron (Northumbria), Sally Chivers (Trent, Canada), Eduard Cuelenaere (Ghent), Beth Haller (Towson, USA), Catherine Long, Nicole Marcotić (Windsor), Maria Tsakiri (Cyprus), Dolly Sen, Sonali Shah (Birmingham), Alison Sheldon (Leeds), Murray Simpson (Dundee), Angela M. Smith (Utah), Heike Steinhoff (Ruhr-University Bochum), Laura Waite (Liverpool Hope).

Restricted access

Alison Wilde

Forthcoming
Restricted access

Experience in the Early Thought of George Tyrrell

Human, Religious, Christian, Catholic

Lawrence J. Donohoo

This study undertakes a comprehensive inquiry into the concept of experience in the thought of George Tyrrell from his earliest writings to 1900. No aspect of experience is passed over in its human, religious, Christian, and Catholic inflections. Tyrrell pursued a vast array of subjects and addressed them in often novel ways, even in his formative years, and at every stage of his thought he encountered the question of experience wherever he roamed. A study of experience in Tyrrell’s early works thus effectively offers a sweeping survey of the full gamut of his early thought. In the beginning we see that he came to recognize only gradually the significance of this category for all his inquiries. While scholars have traced experience in Tyrrell’s mature thought and researched its role in such targeted fields as ecclesiology and fundamental theology, the early writings by contrast have been largely passed over. This suggests a need for an unrestricted search at the origin of Tyrrell’s thought that tracks his discovery, formation, and evolution of this concept. We discover that its flexible and enigmatic character shapes and unifies the various questions that Tyrrell addressed over the years, thus marking his mature theology with a distinct character that was passed on to others in the universe of experience.