Browse by title

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 1,841 items for :

  • History and Political Science x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
Full access

«Polish Risorgimento»

Visions of the Modern Polish Nation and their Italian Foundations

Series:

Lidia Jurek

«The book offers an opportunity to look at the genesis of national identity as it was constructed in a specific stateless and multicultural context through cultural transfer and the impact of the contemporary media. It explores Polish reactions to the Italian Risorgimento which at the time represented the quintessential struggle for national freedom and offered hope for other oppressed nationalities. The Polish intellectuals were inflamed by the Italian movement, mostly as supporters, but also as its fierce opponents. They took on the Risorgimento’s political and civilizational dilemmas, adjusting them to suit their own agendas. By vividly discussing Italy’s political prospects they were filling in the half-empty vessel of Polish national identity. As the result of this dialogue, they placed Poland firmly within Western civilization, determined which factors legitimized their nation and defined its religious outlook. The book allows us to discern the external foundations of such empowering national images as the ‘revolutionary Pole’ and the ‘Pole Catholic.’» Marta Petrusewicz, City University of New York, Università della Calabria.
Full access

Series:

Edited by Olaf Mertelsmann and Kaarel Piirimäe

This volume focuses on the Baltic Sea region during the Cold War. Recent research conducted in several countries has sought to revise a number of long-established assumptions about the Cold-War conflict, as they do not seem to fit into the context of the Baltic world. The bipolar perspective on the Cold War is more and more being replaced by the idea of multiple players being active on different levels. Thus it is now recognised that the so called Iron Curtain was not insurmountable and a variety of contacts in such fields as economics, culture, media or tourism could take place. In addition, neutral countries also participated vividly in Cold War interaction. Thus, not only high politics, security or military issues were at stake.
Full access

Series:

Olaf Mertelsmann

In Estonia, as in other Eastern European countries, the Stalinist era remains in the center of attention of historians. Politics, repression and resistance dominate the historiography, while everyday life is definitely under-represented. This book attempts to close the gap and focuses on different aspects of everyday life in Stalinist Estonia.
Full access

‘To Be Truly British We Must Be Anti-German’

New Zealand, Enemy Aliens and the Great War Experience, 1914-1919

Series:

Andrew Francis

This book is a study of the treatment of New Zealand’s German-speaking settlers during the course of the Great War. As with Britain’s other dominions, New Zealand’s German and Austro-Hungarian residents were subject to a raft of legislation which placed restrictions on their employment and activities, while those considered a danger to domestic security found themselves interned for the duration of the conflict. This book examines public, press and political responses to their presence, and describes how patriotic associations, trade organizations, xenophobic politicians and journalists undertook a vigorous anti-alien campaign resulting, in a number of instances, in anti-German riots.
Central to this book is an examination of the extent to which proimperial sentiment, concepts of citizenship and national identity, increasing European settlement and a progressively volatile European scene set the tone for the manner with which the dominion’s British settlers treated its enemy alien counterparts. Themes discussed include the public’s reaction to war; the government’s internment policy; the establishment of anti-German trade organizations; and the challenges facing Prime Minister William Massey, whose wish to remain fair and just towards enemy aliens often brought him into direct conflict with the more hostile anti-German elements within New Zealand society.
Open access

Series:

Min Reuchamps

En Belgique et au Canada, le fédéralisme est depuis de nombreuses années un sujet d’une brûlante actualité. Son avenir y est régulièrement et intensément débattu.
Pourtant, hormis les sondages, rares sont les tentatives cherchant à mieux comprendre ce que pensent les citoyens du fédéralisme et de son avenir. Pour leur donner la parole, quatre panels citoyens délibératifs, rassemblant au total une centaine de participants, ont été organisés : deux en Belgique (à Anvers, en Flandre, et à Liège, en Wallonie) et deux au Canada (à Kingston, en Ontario, et à Montréal, au Québec). Ces rencontres ont permis aux participants de s’informer et d’échanger, pendant plusieurs heures, avec d’autres citoyens, des experts et des personnalités politiques à propos du fédéralisme dans leur pays respectif.
Fort du recueil de ces opinions mieux informées, ce livre offre une comparaison de quatre cas d’études dont les dynamiques se rejoignent et s’opposent. Différents profils de citoyens émergent de ces regards croisés et illustrent ainsi plusieurs visions divergentes de l’avenir du fédéralisme en Belgique et au Canada.
Open access

Le fédéralisme multinational

Un modèle viable ?

Series:

Edited by Michel Seymour and Guy Laforest

Le fédéralisme multinational est-il un modèle d’organisation politique viable ? La disparition de certaines fédérations multinationales comme l’URSS, la Tchécoslovaquie et la Yougoslavie, de même que la mise à mal de certaines autres expériences fédérales comme la Belgique et le Canada contrastent singulièrement avec le succès relatif des fédérations mononationales comme les États-Unis et l’Allemagne. Dès lors, l’expérience européenne est-elle prometteuse ?
Au-delà d’un examen général de la question de l’aménagement de la diversité nationale au sein des régimes fédératifs, cet ouvrage se penche plus particulièrement sur les problèmes juridiques et politiques épineux auxquels sont confrontés certains pays comme le Canada, la Belgique et l’Espagne.
Full access

Monuments, Memory, and Identity

Constructing the Colonial Past in South Korea

Series:

Guy Podoler

Between 1910 and 1945 Korea was subjected to Japanese colonial rule. Monuments, Memory, and Identity investigates ways how postcolonial South Korea commemorated this difficult past in light of changing political and social conditions, and against the background of the divided nation. By analyzing museums, memorial halls, parks and monuments, the author deciphers and maps the South Korean commemorative landscape. He analyzes the layouts of the country’s well-known «sites of memory» and explores the on-site plaques, exhibits, and photos as well as the booklets and publications. This book underpins the shifts and trends in recollecting this important historical period by addressing the following questions: How has postcolonial South Korea been constructing and reconstructing its colonial past? Why were certain narratives and images chosen at different times? What debates, controversies, and challenges were involved in this dynamic process? Furthermore, the author discusses the South Korean case within the broader context of the postcolonial discourse.
Open access

Nations en quête de reconnaissance

Regards croisés Québec-Catalogne

Series:

Edited by Alain-G. Gagnon and Ferran Requejo

La construction de démocraties de plus en plus complexes en termes nationaux et culturels constitue un des défis majeurs que doivent relever les démocraties libérales. Celles-ci se voient sans cesse remises en question sur les plans politique et constitutionnel par les nations minoritaires qui les façonnent. Tiraillées entre des impératifs de stabilité et de justice, les nations majoritaires et minoritaires misent sur des modèles de pluralisme national concurrents. La Catalogne et le Québec sont à cet égard des exemples paradigmatiques.
Le présent ouvrage explore les parcours historiques et les défis que doivent relever la Catalogne et le Québec : deux nations qui ne disposent pas encore de tous les outils nécessaires à leur pleine émancipation nationale et qui, conséquemment, exigent de leur État multinational respectif une pleine reconnaissance et un juste accommodement de leur personnalité nationale distincte.
Full access

Piero Gobetti’s Turin

Modernity, Myth and Memory

Series:

Niamh Cullen

In his brief public career, Piero Gobetti was one of the most outspoken and original voices of early Italian antifascism. Before his sudden death in 1926, he founded and edited three periodicals, including the fiercely antifascist La Rivoluzione Liberale and the literary journal Il Baretti. While much has been written about his antifascism and his theories of ‘liberal revolution’, this book considers him primarily as an ‘organiser of culture’ and situates him both in the context of his lived experience in Turin after the First World War and in a wider European panorama. Although politically marginal by 1918, Turin was one of Italy’s most modern cities, with its futuristic Fiat factories, vocal working class and militant socialist intellectuals such as Antonio Gramsci. The book explores Gobetti’s encounters with Turin – both its history and the modern, urban landscape of Gobetti’s own day – as central to his thinking. Historically and geographically, Turin was also the Italian city closest to France and northern Europe. If Gobetti’s immediate surroundings inspired much of his thinking, his sensibilities were – in true Piedmontese style – more European than Italian, and his ultimate impact far from only local. Finally, Gobetti’s bitter disillusionment with liberal and fascist Italy, as well as his refusal to fit any of the conventional political labels, means that his memory has remained contentious right up to the present day. This groundbreaking new study explores the roots of Gobetti’s thinking, his impact on Italian culture and his controversial legacy.
Full access

African Teachers on the Colonial Frontier

Tswana Evangelists and Their Communities During the Nineteenth Century

Series:

Stephen C. Volz

African Teachers on the Colonial Frontier is an exploration of the profound social and personal changes that accompanied the expansion of European influence in the interior of southern Africa during the nineteenth century, focusing on the role played by Tswana Christian evangelists. Drawing on a wide range of sources and locating African converts rather than European missionaries at the center of the story, this book provides new insights into the development of African-European relations and the impact of colonization. Although Christian missions played an important role in European expansion, this book reveals that during much of the nineteenth century, Europeans had little control over the various ways that Africans interpreted, assimilated, and propagated Christianity, and how Christianity acquired meanings contrary to its presumed role as a vehicle for European imperialism. Africans associated Christianity with Europeans, but the implications of that association changed as relations between Africans and Europeans changed. More influential was the association of Christianity with certain individuals or families and their employment of Christianity as an element of politico-religious authority. Africans transformed Christianity as they were themselves transformed by it, and their efforts were usually motivated by very personal or local concerns, often despite – rather than because of – Christianity’s association with foreigners.
Given its broad chronological scope and accessible prose, this book will be useful to undergraduate students studying the history of Africa, religion, or colonialism. The book’s detailed references to specific people and places in southern Africa also make it of interest to students and other readers residing in that region with an interest in the history of their churches or particular communities.