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John E. Petrovic

Though conservatives and criticalists perhaps espouse different values and social assumptions as rationale for reforming schools, they both seek to "fix" schools. Unschooling Critical Pedagogy, Unfixing Schools argues that in this move to fix, they both either deny or misread the material dimension of schooling, thereby unnecessarily limiting possibilities for human flourishing within educational environments. In order to unfix schools, making them dynamic and critical places of engagement, educators must review and revive their critical roots through Marx to overcome the educational necrophilia that has simply overwhelmed schools through the material conditions both within and without. Critical pedagogy is insufficient for such a project, with some iterations of it becoming errors of commission. Moving from Marx to Althusser to Illich, Unschooling Critical Pedagogy, Unfixing Schools concludes with a recommendation for unschooling in schools which requires getting students out of schools as much as possible.

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Brothers in Charge

Black Male Leadership in Higher Education and Public Health

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Edited by Sterling J. Saddler and Maureen P. Bezold

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2012) reported that in 2011, black males held 9.7 percent of management positions in the United States. Brothers in Charge: Black Male Leadership in Higher Education and Public Health offers the unique perspectives of a number of black males who have attained leadership positions against many odds in higher education or in public health. This book includes contributed chapters by Dr. Alphonso Simpson, Dr. John R. Lumpkin, Dr. Sherwood Thompson, Dr. John C. Williams, and others. Brothers in Charge is meant to inspire leaders of today and tomorrow to seek positions in disciplines where they are underrepresented, especially within the education and health fields. Brothers in Charge is intended for professionals in both higher education and public health who aspire to be leaders in these disciplines.

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Edited by Shawn Anthony Robinson

In today’s educational space, no student who struggles with reading should be denied a fair and equal education just because teachers are not trained to understand the implications of dyslexia. Failing to learn to read is not failing to learn. It merely means that the orthodox methods of whole-language reading instruction have not favored those students who need specific multisensory instruction.

In Narratives from Mothers of Children with Dyslexia: Our Stories for Educators, mothers share personal stories of pain in navigating educational spaces for the success of their sons and daughters who are dyslexic. Despite resistance from within the PreK–12 academy, these mothers have become warriors for education.

The narratives in this text are global ones, from Singapore, India, Kenya, Spain, Great Britain, and the United States, and are in local "dialect." The mothers use a variety of terms to describe their experiences, but the differences in language only prove that the language of experience is universal; we can understand everyone, even if they use different terms or names. We understand what they have learned through the challenges and struggles of serving as the backbone of their child’s education. We can easily translate that experience into the global, universal expression of a parent’s love for their child.

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The Practice of Equality

Jacques Rancière and Critical Pedagogy

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Edited by Stephen Cowden and David Ridley

This book is the first to focus specifically on the highly original contribution to the field of Critical Pedagogy made by the sometimes «irritable» French philosopher Jacques Rancière. The book represents a significant addition to the growing body of work on Rancière as well as to the field of Critical Pedagogy. While introducing and contextualising Rancière for those unfamiliar with him, the book also develops an understanding of the singularity of his conception of pedagogy for those already acquainted with his work. Central to the book is Rancière’s vision of education as a «practice of equality» – a method grounded in an assumption of intellectual equality between students and teachers. Throughout the chapters of the book, the contemporary relevance of this vision is drawn out for educators in schools and universities, adult and popular educators, as well as for political activists. For anyone and everyone with an interest in teaching and learning, this book contains vital insights for the survival and development of education as a democratic, critical and emancipatory project.

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Edited by Anthony J. Nocella II, Sean Parson, Amber E. George and Stephanie Eccles

As the inevitable, unsustainable nature of contemporary society becomes increasingly more obvious, it is important for scholars and activists to engage with the question, "what is to be done?" A Historical Scholarly Collection of Writings on the Earth Liberation Front provides an analysis and overview of an under-discussed but important part of the radical environmental movement, the Earth Liberation Front (ELF), which actively tried to stop ecocide. Through engagement with the activism and thought behind the ELF, volume contributors encourage readers to begin questioning the nature of contemporary capitalism, the state, and militarism. This book also explores the social movement and tactical impact of the ELF as well as governmental response to its activism, in order to strengthen analytic understanding of effectiveness, resistance, and community resilience. A Historical Scholarly Collection of Writings on the Earth Liberation Front is sure to inspire more scholarly work around social change, eco-terrorism, environmental studies, and environmental justice. This book is a valuable text for criminologists, sociologists, environmental advocates, politicians, political scientists, activists, community organizers, and religious leaders.

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From Exploitation Back to Empowerment

Black Male Holistic (Under)Development Through Sport and (Mis)Education

Joseph N. Cooper

Previous critics have documented the damaging effects of the current exploitative sporting and education structures in the United States on Black males and the broader Black community. However, largely missing from scholarly literature and popular discourses on this topic is a comprehensive analysis of the heterogeneity among Black male athletes’ lived experiences and outcomes over their lifespans. From Exploitation Back to Empowerment: Black Male Holistic (Under)Development Through Sport and (Mis)Education by Joseph N. Cooper addresses three major issues: (1) the under theorization of Black male athletes’ socialization processes, (2) the preponderance of deficit-based theories on Black male athletes, and (3) the lack of expansive analyses of Black male athletes from diverse backgrounds. Grounded in empirical research, this text outlines five socialization models of Black male holistic (under)development through sport and (mis)education. The five socialization models include: (a) illusion of singular success model (ISSM), (b) elite athlete lottery model (EALM), (c) transition recovery model (TRM), (d) purposeful participation for expansive personal growth model (P2EPGM), and (e) holistic empowerment model (HEM). Using ecological, race-based, gender-based, psychological, and athletic-based theories, each of the proposed models incorporates critical sociological insights whereby multi-level system factors (sub, chrono, macro, exo, meso, and micro) along with various intersecting identities and additional background characteristics are taken into account. In addition, historical, sociocultural, political, and economic conditions are examined in relation to their influence on Black males’ socialization in and through sport and (mis)education. This nuanced analysis allows for the development of a systematic blueprint for Black male athletes’ holistic development and more importantly collective racial and cultural uplift.

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Doug Selwyn

What would schools and communities look like if the health and well-being of all our children were our highest priorities? More important than test scores, profits, or real estate values? What actions would we take if we wanted to guarantee that all our children were growing up with what they needed to be healthy, happy, and successful—and not just some of them?

The United States was once among the healthiest countries in the world. As of now, it is ranked no better than twenty-ninth. Those who bear the brunt of our worsening health are the poor, people of color, and, most of all, our children. All Children Are All Our Children situates our ongoing health crisis within the larger picture of inequality and the complex interplay of systems in the U.S. based on class, privilege, racism, sexism, and the ongoing tension between the ideals of democracy and the realities of corporate capitalism. Public education is caught in the middle of those tensions.

All Children Are All Our Children begins by defining what we mean by health, looking at the many factors that support or undermine it, and then identifies steps that can be taken locally in our schools and in our communities that can support the health and well-being of our young people and their families, even as we work towards necessary change at the state and national policy level.

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Edited by Glenda M. Prime

Centering Race in the STEM Education of African American K–12 Learners boldly advocates for a transformative approach to the teaching of STEM to African American K–12 learners. The achievement patterns of African American learners, so often described as an "achievement gap" between them and their White peers, is in fact the historical legacy of slavery and the racial hierarchy that was necessary to maintain it. The achievement gap is a contemporary manifestation of the racial hierarchy that continues in STEM to the present time. The racial hierarchy in STEM education is upheld by structural arrangements, policies, and practices, sometimes invisible, but ultimately denies access and depresses performance of African American K–12 learners in STEM. This book argues that disrupting these patterns of achievement and realizing more equitable outcomes for this demographic is essentially a political act that requires that race be overtly addressed and centered in the STEM education of these children—an approach called "race-visible pedagogy." While this approach incorporates some of the elements of culturally responsive pedagogy and other anti-racist or liberatory pedagogies, it advances the thinking about such approaches by shifting the emphasis from the outcomes of such pedagogies to the experience of them. This book covers a range of issues related to the STEM education of African American K–12 learners and includes theoretical pieces that offer insightful, new, and asset-based, as opposed to deficit-based, frameworks for understanding and disrupting the patterns of achievement of African American children, as well examples of the practice of race-visible pedagogies.

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Controlling Our Children

Hegemony and Deconstructing the Positive Behavioral Intervention Support Model

Thomas David Knestrict

Controlling Our Children: Hegemony and Deconstructing the Positive Behavioral Intervention Support Model represents the first steps in a protest movement. It is a microscopic look into a system that educators take for granted as a positive force for children. In a thorough and detailed fashion, Thomas David Knestrict deconstructs the troubling history, development, and eventual embrace of a ubiquitous system of control that our public schools and government now mandate for use. Knestrict uses a powerful social justice lens to reconstruct the framework of a more responsive and just system of supports that result in autonomy, not scripted control. Controlling Our Children is perfect for pre-service teachers learning how to manage a classroom that fosters autonomy and an internal locus of control. It is also a perfect book for a graduate-level course in discipline discourse or disability studies. This book is for anyone who is at all worried about imposed systems of control that hinder the development of free will, freedom of choice, and personal autonomy in an age of false news, political manipulation, and control.

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Coordinate Colleges for American Women

A Convergence of Interests, 1947-78

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Linda C. Morice

Coordinate Colleges for American Women: A Convergence of Interests, 1947–78 explores the history of the coordinate college—a separate school of higher learning for women connected to an older, all-male institution. This book places special emphasis on three (previously all-male) liberal arts colleges located in the Midwest and upstate New York. They established women’s coordinate colleges in the years following World War II, but ended them by 1980, becoming fully coeducational. The author draws on new primary sources to show that, in each case, a coordinate college was created to meet the converging interests of the founding institution—not to improve the education of women. The work is set in the context of four major social movements during the mid-to-late twentieth century involving civil rights, student rights, antiwar protest, and women’s liberation.