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Mairi McDermott

Mapping the Terrains of Student Voice Pedagogies is an autoethnography of McDermott’s experiences with student voice reforms. Ultimately, the author is concerned with better understanding the possibilities for student voice as a transformative teaching and learning practice within the context of neoliberal education. The discussion is anchored in two past student voice projects in which McDermott was involved, one as a researcher and one as a facilitator. As method, the author revisits these experiences through memory and various artifacts to unpack embodied voices of difference. More specifically, McDermott is concerned with how teachers take up student voice in their pedagogies, how teachers come to understand themselves and their students in terms of student voice, and how social differences contour student voice pedagogies. The author queries: How do experiences with student voice inform teacher ß à student relationships? And, how are student voice practices shaped, organized, and inscribed through social difference? Grounding this inquiry is post-structural feminist anti-racism as an interwoven discursive orientation and politics for troubling and transforming schooling and education. Analyses address how McDermott’s presence as an individual and as a member of socio-historical groups in the student voice initiatives affected the projects’ dynamics. The findings amplify the necessity of time and space for educators to critically reflect on their practices when implementing reforms, time and space that were provided by engaging autoethnography. The book contributes important strategic processes towards realizing the necessary goals of critical reflexive practices in teaching and learning, addressing the question of ‘how’ one might do critical reflection through autoethnography.

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Black Immigrants in the United States

Essays on the Politics of Race, Language, and Voice

Edited by Ayanna Cooper and Ibrahim Awad

In the United States, ‘immigrant’ is a complicated category. It is used interchangeably with ‘refugee’ and it is, most of the time, linked to South America, especially Latina/os. Black Immigrants in the United States is arguing that immigrants are not refugees and, whether coming from the Caribbean, Latin America or Africa, Black immigrants are oft-silenced in immigration studies and unsystematically researched. Being one of the first books on the topic in the United States, Black Immigrants in the United States is a crack, a verse in the syntax which links Blackness and immigration; a required reading for anyone who is interested in immigration generally and Black immigration in particular. For example, did you know that 12-13% of the statistically defined as African Americans are ‘Black immigrants’ (both immigrants and refugees) (Ogunipe, 2011)? Out of this 12-13%, did you know the first and second-generation constitute 41% of Black first-year students in Ivy League? Black Immigrants in the United States is an attempt to answer these questions and paint a picture for this population, where they come from, what languages and histories they bring with them to the United States, and discusses their challenges as well as their triumphs. With this book, as children of migration ourselves, we are turning researching and writing about Black immigrants into acts of love and reading about them into an expression of jouissance.

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Hip-HopEd: The Compilation on Hip-Hop Education, Volume 2

Hip-Hop as Education & Knowledge of Self

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Edited by Edmund Adjapong and Ian Levy

This second volume in the Hip-Hop Education series highlights knowledge of self as the fifth and often forgotten element of hip-hop. In many cases, a connection to hip-hop culture is one that has been well embedded in the identity of hip hop educators. Historically, academic spaces have had misperceptions and misunderstand the authentic culture of hip-hop, often forcing hip-hop educators to abandon their authentic hip-hop selves to align themselves to the traditions of academia. This edited collection highlights the realities of hip-hop educators who grapple with cultivating and displaying themselves authentically in practice. It provides narratives of graduate students, practitioners, junior and senior scholars who all identify as part of hip-hop. The chapters in this text explore the intersections of the authors’ lived experiences, hip-hop, theory, and practice.

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Dennis Carlson

Edited by Shirley R. Steinberg, Robert Lake and Michael B. MacDonald

The late Dennis Carlson uses the alternative nature of the Burlington, Vermont, bred band, Phish, and the larger impact of rock n’ roll to look at youth and revolutionary music culture. A History of Progressive Music and Youth Culture is designed for those who work with or teach young people to understand the nature and origin of musical commitment and devotion. For academics, the book traces a cultural study of rock which is unlike any other discussion of music or musicology published.

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Minding the Obligation Gap in Community Colleges and Beyond

Theory and Practice in Achieving Educational Equity

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Jeremiah J. Sims, Jennifer Taylor Mendoza, Lasana O. Hotep and Jeramy Wallace

It is difficult to find justice-centered books geared specifically for community college practitioners interested in achieving campus wide educational equity. It is even more difficult to find book in this vein written, exclusively, by community college practitioners. Minding the Obligation Gap in Community Colleges is just that: a concerted effort by a cross-representational group of community college practitioners working to catalyze conversations and eventually practices that attend to the most pressing equity gaps in and on our campuses. By illuminating the constitutive parts of the ever-increasing obligation gap, this book offers both theory and practice in reforming community colleges so that they function as disruptive technologies. It is our position that equity-centered community colleges hold the potential to call out, impede, and even disrupt institutionalized polices, pedagogies, and practices that negatively impact poor, ethno-racially minoritized students of color. If you and your college is interested in striving for educational equity, campus-wide, please join us in this ongoing conversation on how to work for equity for all of the students that we serve.

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Black Men's Studies

Black Manhood and Masculinities in the U.S. Context

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Serie McDougal III

Black Men's Studies offers an approach to understanding the lives and the self determination of men of African descent in the U.S. context. It not only frames their experiences, it also explores the multidimensional approaches to advancing the lives of Black men. Particular attention is given to places Black men in their own unique historical, cultural, and socio-political contexts.

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Community College Leadership and Management

Reframing Institutional Practices for Student Success

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Carlos Nevarez and J. Luke Wood

Community College Leadership and Management places emphasis on reframing college practices in order to advance student success. This calls for leaders to be well versed on promising strategies which have illustrated evidence in advancing academic success. Such practices include intrusive academic advising, exit interviews with dropouts and graduates, and the use of technology to supplement face-to-face academic counselor advising. These leaders are aware of and welcome the challenges and opportunities a changing student population presents to community colleges. The authors critically analyze and call for a deconstruction of conventional practices and the construction of new approaches to understand how student success is envisioned. For example, a redefinition of what constitutes student success is advanced. A redefinition of student success—as the attainment of an academic, vocational, career, or personal goal—is put forth. This broader perception, definition, and meaning of student success is not limited to or constrained by an accountability paradigm. It is driven by the need to capture a more complete picture of the trajectory of contemporary and traditional enrollees from increasingly diverse backgrounds: students whose goals do not fit solely and neatly into two traditionally dominant outcomes like graduation and transfer. It is the role of community college leaders to affirm, inculcate, and communicate this more nuanced definition, allowing it to guide the vision and mission, programs, policies, and practices of the institution. Carlos Nevarez and Luke J. Wood support their arguments through various models, frameworks, research findings, case studies, and presentation of self-reflective questions aimed at advancing reflective community college scholar-practitioners.

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China's Path to Education Modernization, Vol. 1

Innovations in Education Concepts: From Correction to Creation

Zhenguo Yuan

China's Path to Education Modernization, Vol. 1: Innovations in Education Concepts: From Correction to Creation summarizes a set of socialist education development systems with Chinese characteristics from scratch in the past 40 years of reform and opening up in China. From the change of educational concept, the development of educational undertakings, the gradual improvement of educational legal system to the prosperity of educational science, China’s Path to Education Modernization involves the reform and development of all kinds of education at all levels. It can be called the encyclopedia of educational development in China for decades and covers the macro-analysis and practical guidance of China's educational development. It is a suitable supplement for educational theory experts, frontline workers, and general readers worldwide.

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De/constructing Literacies

Considerations for Engagement

Amélie Lemieux

De/constructing Literacies: Considerations for Engagement reviews and defines the concept of engagement in literacy studies from different epistemologies. Well-suited for literacy researchers and graduate students, it considers the foundations of arts-based research, cognitive psychology, ethnography, phenomenology, posthuman theories, with a final chapter on walking methodologies, to better understand how engagement can be framed and looked at in literacy studies.

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Edited by Bernd Käpplinger

Nach dem zentralen Beitrag von Franz Pöggeler von 1959 wird 60 Jahre später der aktuelle Stand der Raum- und Ortssituation der Erwachsenenbildungshäuser präsentiert und diskutiert. Konzepte für Lernzentren und andere Lernorte fließen dabei ein und bereichern das Spektrum der räumlichen Optionen und Positionen wie Erwachsenenbildung architektonisch sichtbar und lokalisiert wird.