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Edited by Alison Wilde

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Editorial Board: Eleoma Bodammer (Edinburgh), Catalin Brylla (Bournemouth), Colin Cameron (Northumbria), Sally Chivers (Trent, Canada), Eduard Cuelenaere (Ghent), Beth Haller (Towson, USA), Catherine Long, Nicole Marcotić (Windsor), Maria Tsakiri (Cyprus), Dolly Sen, Sonali Shah (Birmingham), Alison Sheldon (Leeds), Murray Simpson (Dundee), Angela M. Smith (Utah), Heike Steinhoff (Ruhr-University Bochum), Laura Waite (Liverpool Hope).

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Alison Wilde

Forthcoming
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Series:

Mihai Dragnea

This book addresses the conversion of the Wends, and how Christian writers of the tenth and eleventh centuries perceived the submission of the Wends to the Christian faith. The main concern of the ecclesiastical authorities was to bring the apostate Wends back into the imperium Christianum.: everyone who had accepted Christian baptism had to be prevented by all possible means from religious and political apostasy. More widely, the formation of a Christian identity is an excellent example of how conversion was a fluid set of propositions, discussed and rehearsed, influenced by many factors (not just canonical), and deployed in many contexts. This book’s task is to unravel how this dynamism played out against a marginal group.

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Edited by Mihai Dragnea

This is a single-blind peer reviewed series which provides an opportunity for scholars to publish high-quality studies on the culture, society and economy of Scandinavia and the Baltic region under the influence of Christianity. It welcomes submissions in various formats, including monographs, edited volumes, conference proceedings, and short form publications between 30,000 to 50,000 words (Peter Lang Prompts) on subjects related to: Christian kingship, Christian and pagan identity, cultural encounters, otherness, barbarians, missionary strategy, canonical aspects of missionary work, forced conversion, clerical involvement in warfare, military orders, Holy War, martyrdom, sacralisation of a landscape, pilgrimage, shrines of gods, relics of saints, icons, and war banners, pagan war rituals, diet and fashion, rural area and the concept of town life, intragroup and intergroup relations, linguistic interactions, narratives gesta episcoporum, saga studies, colonization, ethnography, mental geographies, political relations, dynastic marital alliances, media and communication, trade, exploration, mappae mundi, art history, architecture, numismatics, and all archaeological sub-disciplines.

Editorial Board: Bjorn Bandlien (University of South-Eastern Norway), Carsten Selch Jensen (University of Copenhagen), Anti Selart (University of Tartu), Mia Munster-Swendsen (Roskilde University), Jakub Morawiec (University of Silesia), Carole Cusack (University of Sydney), Stanislaw Rosik (University of Wroclaw), Felix Biermann (University of Greifswald), Darius von Guttner-Sporzynski (University of Melbourne), Kristin Ilves (University of Helsinki), Jukka Korpela (University of Eastern Finland), Fjodor Uspenskij (Institute of Russian Language, Russian Academy of Sciences), Zbigniew Dalewski (Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences), Yitzhak Hen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Bertil Nilsson (University of Gothenburg), Rob Meens (Utrecht University), Jon Vidar Sigurdsson (University of Oslo), Cecilia Ljung (Stockholm University), Aleksandr Musin (Institute for the History of Material Culture, Russian Academy of Sciences).

Proposals and author/volume editor CV should be sent to mihaidragnea2018@gmail.com.

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Edited by Graeme Davis and Kieran McCartney

The global COVID-19 lockdown has led to a complete transformation of education. Never again could pedagogy be separated from its digital dimension. Traditional learning practices were replaced overnight by digital practices, frequently untested. Many educational settings were forced to address the fragmented national and regulatory frameworks that direct teaching and learning practice as well as testing. The Digital Learning and the Future book series was born of the pandemic, offering an outlet for teachers and scholars to share their research and practices in this new reality.

This interdisciplinary book series examines the use of digital technology in education. It is part of an unfolding educational agenda around technology-enhanced learning, where technology is both blended as a tool within existing pedagogies and drives new pedagogies. The series looks to the future, to emerging technologies and methodologies. Areas of interest include educational futures and future pedagogies, pedagogy and globalization (including MOOC), mobile learning, edtech, technology in assessment, and technology and face-to-face blended learning.

The series encourages proposals for short-format books (between 25,000 and 50,000 words) with the aim of responding quickly to this rapidly changing field. Short monographs, co-authored or edited collections, case studies, practical guides and more are all welcome.

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Mobile Education

Personalised Learning and Assessment in Remote Education: A Guide for Educators and Learners

Series:

Kieran McCartney

Forthcoming
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Edited by Sandra Levey and Sharon Moonsamy

This book describes problems faced by underserved and unserved populations. These are the growing number of migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers, as well as those among native born populations who lack equal access to basic health and education services, nutrition, clean water, and adequate living conditions. These inequalities result from the power deficit that derives from structural or systemic racism. Critical reflection or critical thinking allows us to better understand the systemic exercise of power by dominant groups that support a racial or ethnic hierarchy that has a negative impact on the living standards of the underserved and unserved. This hierarchy establishes a ranking of groups under the control of a dominant group, leading to inequalities in education, healthcare, income, and wealth. Critical reflection allows us to recognize how systems of privilege and oppression have influenced our thinking and actions. Studies conducted in the United States and South Africa show that marginalized groups reported receiving poor quality of health care, facing discrimination because of their race or ethnicity and communication/language barriers. The chapters in this book examine the inequalities faced by underserved and unserved populations in several countries across the globe, with strategies to address these problems.

This book would be of interest to the general population, along with courses in health care, sociology, political science, and courses and schools of public health.

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Edited by Soli Shahvar

This volume brings together a selection of essays from the Lecture Series in Bahá’í studies at the University of Haifa. Each chapter explores an aspect of the Bahá’í religion, including its history, community, culture and theoretical perspectives on contemporary issues. The authors discuss topics including the family and descendants of the Báb (founder of the religion from which the Bahá’í Faith emerged), the influential role of Bahá’í schools in the modernization of education in Iran, the process of introducing the law of monogamy into the Iranian Bahá’í community, early connections between Swiss citizens and Bahá’ís in the Middle East, the rich and varied landscape of Persian Bahá’í poetry, and the role of African Americans in the development of the US Bahá’í community, particularly with regard to race relations and the principle of the oneness of humanity. Also presented in this volume are Bahá’í perspectives on contemporary topics including changing conceptions of work and work values, the role of apologetics in interfaith dialogue, and the issue of ‘defamation of religions’ in international human rights discourse. This book will be of interest to readers in various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences who want to become informed in more depth about a wider range of topics in the emerging field of Bahá’í studies.
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Distinto amanecer: Max Aub en México, 1943-1944

Industria cinematográfica y política cultural

Series:

César A. Núñez

En 1943 se filmó la película Distinto amanecer, basada en la obra teatral La vida conyugal, de Max Aub. A partir de entonces, el escritor trabajará en la industria cinematográfica mexicana, que experimentaba un notable desarrollo, una verdadera "época de oro", y será para él una de sus principales fuentes de ingresos con las que subsistir en su vida de exiliado republicano. Las tensiones resultantes de la primera relación con esa industria tendrán consecuencias sobre su posterior inserción en el ámbito cultural del país de refugio. Revisar esas tensiones ayuda a comprender los primeros tiempos de Aub en México tanto como a vislumbrar rasgos del mundo intelectual en el que desenvolvió su trabajo. La película, en fin, permite hilar una compleja red de nexos entre la política, la industria cultural y la esfera artística, para mostrar una imagen no siempre perceptible a simple vista. Dado que la adaptación de la obra teatral al film generó una serie de conflictos entre Aub y el director, Julio Bracho, se estudia aquí esa polémica, a partir no sólo de los documentos rescatados por diversos investigadores, sino también, por primera vez, del guion original de la película. Este guion, olvidado desde 1943, es un interesante documento que echa luz sobre los objetivos y pretensiones de una producción con la que, a pesar de todo, Aub comenzaba su extenso vínculo con el cine mexicano.
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Symbols of Hope, Resistance and Change

Female Characterization in the Novel of the Dictatorship

Lori Lammert

There are few critical studies about female characterization in the novel of the Latin American dictatorship.The existing studies, "La mujer ante la dictaduraen las dos primerasnovelas de Isabel Allende," by Alina Camacho Gingerich, "De amor y de sombra: Una aproximación a sulectura," by Eliana Moya Raggio, and Female Development Amidst Dictatorship in Julia Alvarez’s In the Time of the Butterflies and Mario Vargas Llosa’s La fiesta del Chivo by Sereana Eileen Call, focus on female characters in novels written by Isabel Allende and Julia Alvarez. This lack of criticism ignores what other Latin American writers may have to say about female characterization in such narratives. Though a simple critical approach might be to focus on female characterization in novels written only by women, male writers should not be excluded because they often make strong statements about women’s conditions through their female characters (Urania in La Fiesta del chivo, by Mario Vargas Llosa, for example). This work argues that the main female characters in Ivan Ângelo’s A Festa (Brazil), Diamela Eltit’sPor la patria (Chile), and Luisa Valenzuela’s Cola de lagartija (Argentina) function as symbols of hope, resistance and social change and that they do so in ways different from the male characters because of their unique relationships with the authoritarian regimes, which can be read as political manifestations of patriarchal order. This work will be of importance in the fields of gender studies, women’s studies, Latin American studies, and contemporary Latin American literature.