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Dafydd Sills-Jones, Jouko Aaltonen and Pietari Kaapa

Forthcoming
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Giving with an Agenda

How New Philanthropy Advocates for the Corporate Reform of Education

Marina Avelar

Forthcoming
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Edited by Caroline Archer-Parré, Malcolm Dick and John Hinks

This series unites the allied fields of printing history and print culture, and is therefore concerned not only with the design, production and distribution of printed material but also its consumption, reception and impact. It includes the histories of the machinery and equipment, of the industry and its personnel, of the printing processes, the design of its artefacts (books, newspapers, journals, fine prints, and ephemera) and with the related arts and crafts, including calligraphy, type-founding, typography, papermaking, bookbinding, illustration, and publishing. It also covers the cultural context and environment in which print was produced and consumed.

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Ian Cawood

Forthcoming
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Writing the Self, Writing the Nation

Romantic Selfhood in the Works of Germaine de Staël and Claire de Duras

Stacie Allan

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Violent Disruptions

American Imaginations of Racial Anxiety in William Faulkner and Richard Wright

Series:

Linda Chavers

Violent Disruptions: American Imaginations of Racial Anxiety in William Faulkner and Richard Wright examines two authors who have powerfully predicted the formation of racial identities and its surrounding discourse in the United States today: William Faulkner (1897–1962) and Richard Wright (1908–1960). Using the works of Faulkner and Wright, this text argues that race becomes visible only through image production and exchange. Further, it argues that following the dismantling of our legally upheld racial inequality and everyday racist language, it is precisely the visual register wherein we see most acutely the continued present-day operation of racial inequality. Violent Disruptions thus places William Faulkner and Richard Wright at the center of our current dramas in the 21st century in popular television, political theater and criminal justice.

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Unsettling the Gap

Race, Politics and Indigenous Education

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Sophie Rudolph

Unsettling the Gap: Race, Politics and Indigenous Education examines pressing issues of inequality in education. The notion of gap—and the need to close it—is used widely in public and policy debates to name the nature and scope of disadvantage. In the competitive world of education, gaps have become associated with students who are seen to be "falling behind," "failing" or "dropping out." A global deficit discourse is, therefore, mobilised and normalised. But this discourse has a history and is deeply political. Unsettling the Gap examines this history and how it is politically activated through an analysis of the "Australian Closing the Gap in Indigenous Disadvantage" policy. In this policy discourse the notion of gap serves as a complex and multiple signifier, attached to individuals, communities and to national history.

In unravelling these diverse modalities of gap, the text illuminates the types of ruling binaries that tend to direct dynamics of power and knowledge in a settler colonial context. This reveals not only the features of the crisis of "Indigenous educational disadvantage" that the policy seeks to address, but the undercurrents of a different type of crisis, namely the authority of the settler colonial state. By unsettling the normalised functions of gap discourse the book urges critical reflections on the problem of settler colonial authority and how it constrains the possibilities of Indigenous educational justice.

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The Teacher’s Closet

Lesbian and Gay Educators in Georgia’s Public Middle Schools

Heather A. Cooper

The stories in The Teacher’s Closet: Lesbian and Gay Educators in Georgia’s Public Middle Schools reveal the intricate and multifaceted process of identity management that lesbian and gay Georgia middle school teachers regularly engage in, with the intention of carefully negotiating the conservative, heterosexist, and at times homophobic culture of education. Disclosure for a homosexual teacher is not a one-time event. As the stories reveal, managing one's sexual identity is an ongoing process. A feeling of uneasiness surrounding acceptance from others is also a regular occurrence in the homosexual community. To understand why lesbian and gay teachers feel the need to conceal and protect their homosexual identities, it is necessary to understand the social and political climate that forces them to surrender their real identity. In our heterosexist society where homosexuals are often portrayed as different, even sinful, it is not surprising that many homosexual teachers refrain from disclosing their sexual identity to their students, especially in the conservative state of Georgia. The Teacher’s Closet is relevant to courses that include diversity in teacher education and teach inclusion and equality in education.

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Religion Across Television Genres

Community, Orange Is the New Black, The Walking Dead, and Supernatural

Joseph M. Valenzano III and Erika Engstrom

Religion Across Television Genres: Community, Orange Is the New Black, The Walking Dead, and Supernatural connects communication theories to the religious content of TV programs across an array of platforms and content genres, specifically the NBC comedy Community, the critically acclaimed Netflix series Orange Is the New Black, AMC’s international megahit The Walking Dead, and the CW’s long-running fan favorite Supernatural. Its contemporary relevancy makes Religion Across Television Genres ideal for use as a library resource, scholarly reference, and textbook for both undergraduate and graduate courses in mass media, religious studies, and popular culture.

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Series:

Philip Klusen

Als Vascularized Composite Allografts werden komplexe Gewebe wie Arme, Beine, Hände, das Gesicht, der Uterus oder die Bauchwand bezeichnet. Die Transplantation dieser Körperteile entwickelte sich in den vergangenen beiden Jahrzehnten, gehört aber nach wie vor der Neulandmedizin an. Weder die europäischen Richtlinien noch die nationalen Gesetze enthalten explizite Regelungen für den Umgang mit komplexen Geweben. Es stellt sich deshalb die Frage nach einer sachgerechten rechtlichen Einordnung. Entscheidende Bedeutung kommt dabei der Frage zu, ob komplexe Gewebe Organe im Sinne des Transplantationsgesetzes darstellen und ob somit die Organvorschriften dieses Gesetzes anwendbar sind.