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Academic Culture

Traditions and the Present Day

Zbigniew Drozdowicz

The author of this book formulates a general thesis that in the academic culture, since the emergence of the first universities until this very day, two types of that culture have competed with each other, i.e., a corporate and templar one. In his remarks, the author tries to highlight it through the presentation of:

1. The functioning of academia in different time periods, 2. The beliefs of scholars, 3. The ways scholarly achievements have been evaluated, 4. The legal acts for science and academia. A considerable part of this study is devoted to the analysis of the Polish academic culture, including the attempts of adjusting the existing standards of conducting research and educating students to the ones prevailing in the leading Western countries.

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Agata Handley

When, in 1948, Tony Harrison entered Leeds Grammar School as a scholarship boy, he found himself, as Richard Hoggart saw, “at the friction point of two cultures”. His schooling introduced him to the “classics”; but it also deprived him of a clear identification with the place where he grew up. His work reflects and explores this tension; and it may be seen, in some ways, as a form of “identity construction.”

The book examines key texts such as v. and the School of Eloquence sequence, where this “construction” takes different forms—oscillating between identity as a state, or a process; as continuity, or change; or as the outcome of conformity, or revolt.

This second edition has been extensively revised and includes a new chapter on Harrison’s Elegies.

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The Origins of the Welfare State

Polish Social Policy in the Period 1918–1939

Paweł Grata

The book focuses on the Polish social policy, its contextual (historical, organisational, conceptual, financial) conditionings, the institutions it fitted in, and primarily on the practical activities, undertaken by the state and other entities with regard to its individual domains. The time span covered by the analysis is the period of 1918–1939. The scope of the research is based on the ways the social policy in the interwar period was conceptualised. It covers labour and employment issues (labour legislation, combatting unemployment, migration policy), social insurance (retirement pension, work injury, sickness insurance), social welfare (support for the poor, welfare for mothers, children, adults and the disabled, problems of social pathologies) and health care system.

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Edited by Crystal E. Garcia and Antonio Duran

From their founding, Greek letter organizations have maintained legacies of exclusion that have particularly targeted minoritized people including Black, Indigenous, People of Color as well as queer and transgender individuals. In response to larger societal oppression and, more specifically, historical discriminatory practices within historically white sororities and fraternities, culturally-based sororities and fraternities emerged to serve and lift up minoritized communities. Culturally-based sororities and fraternities (CBSFs) include Asian American, Black, Latinx/a/o, LGBTQ, Multicultural, and Historically Native American sororities and fraternities. Unfortunately, conversations on sorority and fraternity life (SFL) have prioritized historically white organizations, perpetuating the same legacies of oppression that led to the formation of culturally-based groups to begin with. This book is a form of resistance to these power dynamics and brings to light the histories, legacies, and strengths of CBSFs as well as ways to re-envision equitable support for these organizations. This book will be instrumental to SFL practitioners, (inter)national sorority and fraternity leadership, and for all SFL members in their efforts to increase their awareness of CBSFs. Additionally, campuses are increasingly embracing opportunities to understand minoritized students’ experiences on campus and to center equitable practice. This book could be used during professional development workshops for deans, faculty, and student affairs professionals to consider how well they are supporting minoritized students and, more specifically, those who are in culturally-based sororities and fraternities. This text can also serve as an important resource for college courses focused on college students, student affairs, and social justice in higher education.
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Gentrifiktionen

Zur Gentrifizierung in deutschsprachigen Berlin-Romanen nach 2000

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Hanna Henryson

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Kenneth J. Yin

Dungan Folktales and Legends is a unique anthology that acquaints English-speaking readers with the rich and captivating folk stories of the Dungans, Chinese-speaking Muslims who fled Northwest China for Russian Central Asia after failure of the Dungan Revolt (1862–1877) against the Qing dynasty. The most comprehensive collection of Dungan folk narratives, available now in English for the first time, this volume features translations of oral narratives collected in the former Soviet Central Asian republics of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan in the twentieth century, and first published in Dunganskie narodnye skazki i predaniia (1977), which was edited by the internationally renowned Russian sinologist Boris L. Riftin and compiled by his prominent Dungan colleagues Makhmud A. Khasanov and Ilʹias I. Iusupov. The Dungan folk narrative tradition is a vibrant and fascinating tapestry of Chinese, Islamic, and various Central Asian cultural elements.

The present volume is comprised of a chapter introducing the Dungan tale and three chapters containing 78 folk stories organized in the following categories: wonder tales and animal tales; novelistic tales, folk anecdotes, and adventure stories; and legends, historical tales, and narratives. Also included are appendixes, a glossary, an index, the original notes to the texts, and translator’s notes aimed at an English-reading audience. This volume will be of interest to general readers, as well as students and scholars of folklore, ethnography, anthropology, comparative literature, Chinese studies, and Central Asian studies.

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Reflections on Syntax

Lectures in General Linguistics, Syntax, and Child Language Acquisition

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Joseph Galasso

The lectures in this book are immensely Chomskyan in spirit, recursive-syntactic in nature, and tethered to a framework which takes as the null hypothesis the notion that language is an innate, pre-determined biological system—a system which by definition is multi-complex, human-specific, and analogous to a philosophy highly commensurate of Descartes’ great proverbial adage which announces the calling for a ‘ghost-in-the-machine’. The book begins with a gradual assessment of the kinds of complex constructs students of syntax need to work-up. Leading to the classic ‘Four-Sentences’—each of which bears as a kind of post-mark its own decade of Chomskyan analysis—we trace the origins of generative grammar from the fields of child language acquisition (of the 1960s), to psycholinguistics (of the 1970s), to where we stand today within the Minimalist Program. Various spin-off proposals have been spawned by envisioned analyses which treat syntactic movement as the quintessential human processing—a processing which would give rise to human language. Such spin-offs include ‘Proto-language’ and a new treatment of the so-called morpho-syntactic ‘Dual Mechanism Model’.

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Invisible Effects

Rethinking Writing through Emergence

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Chris Mays

Invisible Effects directly engages systems and complexity theory to reveal how the effects of writing and writing instruction work in deferred, disguised, and unexpected ways. The book explains how writing and language that exist in "writing systems" can indirectly (though powerfully) affect people and environments in sometimes distant contexts. In so doing, the book takes on a question central to rhetoric and writing throughout its long history but perhaps even more pressing today: how do we recognize and measure the effects of writing when those effects are so tangled up with our complex material and discursive environments? The surprisingly powerful effects explored here suggest new ways of thinking about and teaching writing and the applications, lessons, and examples in the text precisely model what this thinking and teaching might look like.

This book is primed to serve as an important addition to reading lists of scholars and graduate students in Writing Studies and Rhetoric and should appear on many syllabi in courses on writing and writing instruction and on rhetoric, both introductory and advanced. As well, the book’s advocacy for the unrecognized potential impact of writing instruction makes it appealing for writing program directors and any potential university faculty, administrators, and non-academics interested in the importance and the efficacy of writing instruction. This book is also a useful resource for scholars and graduate students specializing in Writing Across the Curriculum, as the text provides a useful way to shift the conversation and communicate about writing across disciplines.

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Steven Randolph Cureton

Black women are long overdue for proper recognition as primary love interests and researchers who are so inclined must do a better job of uncovering examples of black men who proclaim black women as more than a default companion. A primary objective of this book is to examine love letters, civil rights pursuits, and interpersonal relations amongst prominent liberation icons. Additionally, exploring colorism, black power, nihilism, race manners, race matters, black feminism, secular verification of spirituality and racial casting will hopefully provide insight concerning whether black-on-black love is a survival type of love. This is attractive for any undergraduate and graduate level courses seeking to understand the nature of the black experience in America. Moreover, this book is intended to reach audiences interested in the real thin line between love and hate amongst black men and black women.
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Revolutions and the Making of the Modern World

From Peter the Great to Karl Marx

James Cracraft

Edited by William Benton Whisenhunt

Professor James Cracraft is an established specialist on early modern Russian history, particularly the era of Peter the Great (1682-1725), tsar and first Russian emperor. This volume gathers some of the many key articles and reviews published by him over the last forty years and more in a wide variety of scholarly venues, some of which are not readily accessible. They constitute in sum important contributions not only to Russian history broadly understood, but also to the study of history itself. The collection will include a preface by the editor and an introduction by the author, where he will sum up his decades of historical work and point to new avenues of needed research, all the while emphasizing that "history" properly understood does not exist somewhere on its own but is the creation, however imperfect, of professional historians (as "chemistry", say, is properly understood as the work, however imperfect, of professional chemists).