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Irresponsible Citizenship

The Cultural Roots of the Crisis of Authority in Times of Pandemic

Jean-François Caron

The Covid-19 pandemic has revealed the serious crisis of political authorities that liberal societies are currently experiencing. Indeed, a significant number of individuals living in these societies did not hesitate to defy the sanitary rules enacted by their government which has made it difficult for them to stop the virus from spreading. What can explain such a situation? This is what this book is discussing. Whether it is the growing popularity of conspiracy theories, the distrust towards governments or cultural and religious beliefs that take precedence over the respect of governments’ directives, all these factors that have led so many individuals to act in an irresponsible way during the pandemic find their roots in the liberal tradition as it originated in the 18th century and in its more recent development which has had the effect of decentralizing the individual from his collective responsibilities in favor of an almost unlimited enjoyment of his individual freedom. This health crisis has revealed the urgency for liberal societies to establish a better balance between collective interest and individual freedom through responsible citizenship capable of protecting its citizens against the adoption of draconian measures when they will be struck again by upcoming pandemics that appear to be unfortunately inevitable.

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Jotería Communication Studies

Narrating Theories of Resistance

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Robert Gutierrez-Perez

This book articulates Jotería Communication Studies as a subdiscipline and as a praxis for resisting multiple forms of oppression by focusing on how everyday performances of identity and culture challenge master narratives of power and control. Although this book is for scholars, artists, and practitioners from communication studies, gender and sexuality studies, performance studies, cultural studies, or even, Latinx and Chicanx studies in education, sociology, history, literature, media, arts, and humanities, this book speaks to and with those nonheteronormative mestizas/os who perform their sexuality and gender in queer practices and communicative forms—Jotería. As a methodological intervention into the study of marginalized and subaltern communities, this book provides research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (GBTQ) Chicano and Latino communities from specific geographic regions of the U.S. Southwest. Utilizing multiple methods, this book provides a cultural map or political snapshot of a particular time and place from a particular point of view or location and generates knowledge that highlights reflexivity, cultural/queer nuances, and decolonial acts of resistance. Specifically, this book locates “theories in the flesh” in the borderlands narratives of Jotería, such as cuentos, pláticas, chismé, testimonio, mitos, and consejos. These theories of power and resistance create knowledge about how Jotería make sense of their own difference, how people interpret their assumed or perceived difference, and ultimately, how difference is managed as an emancipatory tool toward the goal of queer of color world making.
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Kipling the Trickster

Knowingness, Practical Jokes and the Use of Superior Knowledge in Kipling's Short Stories

John Coates

This book is an exploration of the way in which the characters in Rudyard Kipling’s short stories use superior knowledge, which often involves deception and the playing of practical jokes. There was early critical hostility to the stance adopted by Kipling’s characters, that of a superior knowledge acquired by friendship with a small male circle. This book engages with a long-standing critical tradition which treats the jokes as acts of vicarious revenge or symptoms of supposed defects in Kipling’s personality, instead setting his use of the practical joke in the wider social context of his time.

In this book Kipling’s writing is examined for what it reveals about a complex, self-conscious but powerful range of values rather than what it is supposed to disguise or conceal. Although he endorsed British colonial rule, Kipling was frank about the slackness, endemic rule-breaking and second-rate nature of British rule in India. He also criticised some of the widespread cultural, religious and moral phenomena of his time, which he thought harmful. Many of his short stories contain an implied but serious criticism of Victorian beliefs, from attitudes to death-beds, and schoolboys to Positivism.

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The Streets Echoed with Chants

The Urban Experience of Post-War West Berlin

Laura Bowie

Forthcoming
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Barry Kanpol and Danielle Lake

Forthcoming.
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Edited by Danielle Lake and Barry Kanpol

How might we interrogate and reimagine the impact of civic, democratic engagement across higher education? This series invites narratives and new studies that critically and creatively explore the possibilities and limitations of civic, democratic engagement within higher education.

The editors seek to gather inclusive, imaginary, transdisciplinary scholarship exploring the impact of next generation civic, democratic engagement from a diverse range of voices. Among others, we hope these voices will include international and indigenous perspectives, members from a diverse array of communities, researchers from across disciplines, teacher-scholars, practitioners and activists, undergraduate and graduate students, politicians, businesses,  and different forms of administration.

The editors invite proposals that critically examine historical, cultural, and structural dimensions of impact while exploring innovative strategies for disrupting and recreating more inclusive, liberatory, and plural forms of civic democratic engagement.

The editors welcome and encourage a wide-range of formats including, but not limited to, narrative studies, ethnographies, mixed method studies, case studies, socio-cultural and/or historical analyses,  theoretical treatises from multiple theoretical lens as well as reports and toolkits that support efforts to examine the  impact of civic democratic engagement. 


For inquiries on submitting a proposal should contact the Series Editors 
Barry Kanpol (Kanpolb@gvsu.edu) & Danielle Lake (lakeda@gvsu.edu) 
with a brief overview of their project, and explanation of how it fits the series, and a current CV. 

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Asian/American Scholars of Education

21st Century Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Experiences, Second Edition

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Edited by Nicholas D. Hartlep, Daisy Ball and Kevin E. Wells

This second edition of Asian/American Scholars of Education: 21st Century Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Experiences shares an updated number of Asian/American luminaries in the field of education. This updated collection of essays and national data analyses acknowledges the struggle that Asian/American Education scholars have faced when it comes to being regarded as legitimate scholars deserving of endowed or distinguished status in the field of education. The chapter contributors in this second edition include postdoctoral mentees, former students, and colleagues of the newly added Asian/American endowed and distinguished professors featured in the book: Hua-Hua Chang, Nicholas Hartlep, Guofang Li, Justin Perry, and Kui Xie. Asian/American Scholars of Education makes an important impact by continuing to ask: Why are there so few Asian/American endowed and distinguished faculty members in education?

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Albert O. Hirschman

Edited by Luca Meldolesi

Well-known as a pioneer of economic development, Albert O. Hirschman has been the flag-bearer of possibilism and reform-mongering in political science. How Reforms Should Be Passed is an anthology of texts chosen personally by Hirschman on the latter production line—as he was to call it informally—that is rooted in his long and quasi-exclusive concern for development and Latin America. Key essays on the formation and the evolution of Hirschman’s point of view on the subject are collected: from "Ideologies of Economic Development in Latin America" to Journeys (and later "A Return Journey") on policy-making; from "Obstacles to the Perception of Change" to "The Search for Paradigms as a Hindrance to Understanding." They show an extraordinary turn of the mind in the making that will be very useful for the United States and the developed world as well—as the final texts of the book on democracy and Europe (Italy, Germany and France) bear out. This book represents a unique opportunity for becoming familiar with many original and perceptive lenses provided by Hirschman to look at the world we live in, and especially to favor social change—focusing (first of all) on the cultural and political side of the matter.

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Alina Petra Marinescu

The book presents the reader with an applied analysis of how the concepts of information and manipulation were illustrated in the Romanian press when the Securitate files were revealed, based on the case of Mona Muscă, a controversial topic that was widely debated by most dailies at the time. One of the most important roles played by the press is agenda setting – the role of setting priorities on the individual’s agenda. Journalists draw up an imaginary list of topics of primary interest for public debate and forming different currents of. The analyzed press segment revealed the predilection for a speech condemning Mona Muscă. The message received by the target audience was not a balanced, objective one, but one that contradicts the deontology of the journalistic profession.

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Origen and Hellenism

The Interplay between Greek and Christian Ideas in Late Antiquity

Panayiotis Tzamalikos

Since 1986, Professor Panayiotis Tzamalikos has argued that Origen was an anti-Platonist in many respects, and all of the clauses in Origen’s official anathematisation in AD 553 were based on nefarious adulteration by unschooled and fanatical drumbeaters. The author’s pertinent books heretofore have uprooted all of those charges and demonstrated that they had nothing to do with Origen’s real thought.

Therefore, Tzamalikos’ work constitutes a peripeteia in the Aristotelian sense of the term, referring to tragedian plays of classical Athens, which points to the moment when the hero learns that everything he knew was wrong.

This book (like the author’s previous ones) brings to light and critically discusses Origen’s Greek philosophical background, which he puts to full use upon composing his Christian works. Consequently, the author insists on the need for engaging in the onerous task of ascertaining Origen’s endowments and feat: whereas he was a Greek ‘apostate’ who forsook his ancestral religion and converted to Christianity when he was well on in years, nevertheless, he implicitly made ample use of his patrimonial lore upon composing his ground-breaking work which paved the way to Nicaea.

The author’s thesis is that, in the quest for discovering the real Origen, scrutinised perusal of this illuminating background is inexorable. For in the history of philosophy, Origen ipso facto is an uncategorised author, whose thought constitutes an unexampled chapter of its own, revealing a perfect match between Christian exegesis and Greek philosophy, which imparted the later episcopal ‘orthodoxy’ the gravamen of its anti-Arian doctrine.