Browse by title

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 1,304 items for :

  • Media and Communication x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Edited by Cathy Fourez and Michèle Guillemont

Este libro presenta periodismos de los extremos latinoamericanos: de América del Norte (México) y América del Sur (Argentina). Los autores son escritores y/o periodistas en plena actividad, reconocidos en su país por su exigencia profesional y su talento, por su respeto al pluralismo de las ideas y algunos, por el riesgo que toman al investigar y al escribir. Dicho volumen consta de algunas crónicas metatextuales que tratan de definir el periodismo escrito hoy, en sus aspectos estéticos y éticos, y que reflexionan sobre la historia del género practicado en Argentina y México a través de experiencias personales. Algunos artículos, por otro lado, apuntan hacia el propio proceso de creación de una narración periodística. Revelan memorias singulares que cuestionan desde lo íntimo la verdad histórica, escriben contra la "cobertura" de hechos sanguinarios relacionados con el crimen organizado, indagan la violencia institucional que tortura y mata, develan el trauma mental y corporal heredado de los regímenes represivos, denuncian un sistema patriarcal, evidencian la relojería de la desigualdad de género, disecan el diálogo conflictivo entre la modernización a ultranza de la sociedad y el radicalismo de ciertas costumbres ancestrales. Otros rescatan relatos de esperanza mediante la potencia cultural de pensadores, creadores y soñadores. Porque en los nuevos periodismos latinoamericanos todo no es sólo violencia. Arraigados en la crónica que descubre mundos, revisten un cariz aventurero por la manera de mirarlos, experimentarlos, reportarlos. Inventan el espacio para, libremente, interpretar, divulgar y discutir aconteceres culturales que van desde las Humanidades a la Ciencia pasando por todas las artes.

Restricted access

Series:

Patricia Medcalf

1959 to 1999 was a pivotal time in the Republic of Ireland’s short history. This book’s journey commences in 1959 when the country had just taken its first steps on the road to internationalization. It concludes 40 years later in 1999, by which time Ireland had metamorphosed into one of the most globalized countries in the world. Inevitably, many of the country’s cultural and societal norms were challenged. The author charts many of the changes that occurred over the course of those years by piecing together a large number of the ads held in the Guinness Archive. Just as Irishness, cultural specificity and the provenance of Guinness formed an integral part of these ads, so too did the growing prevalence of international cultural tropes. The book seeks to interrogate the following: the influence of the Guinness brand’s provenance on advertising campaigns aimed at consumers living in Ireland; the evolution of cultural signs used in Guinness’s advertising campaigns aimed at consumers in Ireland between 1959 and 1999; the extent to which Ireland’s social and economic history might be recounted through the lens of Guinness’s ads; the extent to which Guinness’s advertising might have influenced Irish culture and society.

Restricted access

Fake News

Real Issues in Modern Communication

Series:

Edited by Russell Chun and Susan J. Drucker

In this dizzying post-truth, post-fact, fake news era, the onslaught and speed of potentially untrue, incorrect, or fabricated information (some crafted and weaponized, some carelessly shared) can cause a loss of our intellectual bearings. If we fail to have a common truthful basis for discussions of opinion and policy, the integrity of our democracy is at risk.

This up-to-date anthology is designed to provide a survey of technological, ethical, and legal issues raised by falsehoods, particularly social media misinformation. The volume explores visual and data dissemination, business practices, international perspectives, and case studies. With misinformation and misleading information being propagated using a variety of media such as memes, data, charts, photos, tweets, posts, and articles, an understanding of the theory, mechanisms, and changing communication landscape is essential to move in the right direction with academic, industry, and government initiatives to inoculate ourselves from the dangers of fake news. The book takes an international and multidisciplinary approach with contributions from media studies, journalism, computer science, the law, and communication, making it distinct among books on fake news.

This book is essential for graduate or undergraduate students in courses dealing with fake news and communication studies. Relevant courses include media studies, journalism, public relations, media ethics, media law, social media, First Amendment law, philosophy, and political science.

Restricted access

City Places, Country Spaces

Rhetorical Explorations of the Urban/Rural Divide

Series:

Edited by Wendy Atkins-Sayre and Ashli Quesinberry Stokes

Regional differences matter. Even in an increasingly globalized world, rhetorical attention to regionalism yields very different understandings of geographic areas and the people who inhabit them. Regional identities often become most apparent in the differences (real and perceived) between urban and rural areas. Politicians recognize the perceived differences and develop messages based on that knowledge. Media highlight and exacerbate the differences to drive ratings. Cultural markers (from memorials to restaurants and memoirs and beyond) point to the differences and even help to construct those divisions. The places identified as urban and rural even visually demarcate the differences at times. This volume explores how rhetoric surrounding the urban and rural binary helps shape our understanding of those regions and the people who reside there. Chapters from award-winning rhetorical scholars explain the implications of viewing the regions as distinct and divided, exploring how they influence our understanding of ourselves and others, politics and race, culture, space and place, and more. Attention to urban and rural spaces is necessary because those spaces both act rhetorically and are also created through rhetoric. In a time when thoughtful attention to regional division has become more critical than ever, this book is required reading to help think through and successfully engage the urban/rural divide.

Restricted access

Corporate Communication

Transformation of Strategy and Practice

Michael B. Goodman and Peter B. Hirsch

The forces of uncertainty, globalization, the networked enterprise, Web 2.0, privacy, "big data," and shifting demographics have dramatically transformed corporate communication strategy and practice. Now more than ever, it is more complex, strategic, and essential to the organization’s survival. Corporate Communication: Transformation of Strategy and Practice examines, analyzes, and illustrates the practice of corporate communication as it changes in response to increasing global changes. It builds on the authors’ 2010 Corporate Communication: Strategic Adaptation for Global Practice, as well as their 2015 Corporate Communication: Critical Business Asset for Strategic Global Change.

This book analyzes and illuminates the major communication needs in rapidly evolving organizations: the contemporary communication environment; the importance and impact of intangibles—corporate sustainability, identity, culture, valuation, crisis prevention; the transformation of the media environment; the transformation of the concept of decision-making; the importance of demographics and multigenerational audiences; and technical, geopolitical, economic, and socio-cultural uncertainty. These are significant forces that can potentially augment or diminish an organization’s value.

Restricted access

The Doctor Still Knows Best

How Medical Culture Is Still Marked by Paternalism

Series:

Janet Farrell Leontiou

The Doctor Still Knows Best explores an answer to the question: how can medical culture still be marked by paternalism despite the focused attempts by the medical community to put doctor and patient on more equal footing? The recent push within medicine has been on shared decision-making, truth-telling by the doctor, and creating a medical culture that is patient-centered. The author has discovered that, in practice, medicine tells a very different story.

Since entering the medical world twenty years ago seeking treatment for infertility through IVF, subsequently seeking treatments for her disabled son through the present day, Janet Farrell Leontiou has continually encountered a medical culture where she is not treated as an equal. As a professor of communication, the author has developed an ear for language and is able to deconstruct the ways in which communication choices create a patriarchal medical culture. Dr. Farrell Leontiou also understands how no communication can create a culture without her participation. She, therefore, invites the reader to recognize how we can endorse and recreate a culture that does not serve our interests. Through an examination of her own experience, the book offers insight on how medical paternalism has survived for as long as it has and argues that it never serves the best interest of the patient.

The book provides the reader, medical student and/or health communication student with a fresh way of thinking about how communicative choices create culture.

Restricted access

Series:

Edited by Zbigniew Oniszczuk, Dagmara Głuszek-Szafraniec and Mirosława Wielopolska-Szymura

This book is the fruit of scientific research conducted using quantitative and qualitative methods regarding the mutual relations between the media elites and the political elites in Poland. The authors of this work focus on several virtuous aspects of this issue: on the characteristic model of opinion-forming journalism, also on the differences presented by female and male journalists in the assessment of the relations between politicians and journalists, as well as on the differences between local and national level of mass media in terms of external and internal autonomy of journalists, next on the importance of opinion-forming media in the process of creating a sense of political subjectivity in their recipients, and finally on the phenomenon of politicization of cultural issues in opinion-forming weeklies in Poland.

Restricted access

Health News and Responsibility

How Frames Create Blame

Series:

Lesa Hatley Major and Stacie Meihaus Jankowski

Who the public blames for health problems determines who the public believes is responsible for solving those health problems. Health policies targeting the broader public are the most effective way to improve health. The research approach described in this book will increase public support for critical health policies. The authors systematically organized and analyzed 25 years of thematic and episodic framing research in health news to create an approach to reframe responsibility in health news in order to gain public support for health policies. They apply their method to two of the top health issues in world—obesity and mental health—and conclude by discussing future research and plans for working with other health scholars, health practitioners, and journalists.

Restricted access

Hip Hop Harem

Women, Rap and Representation in the Middle East

Angela S. Williams

Although hip hop culture has widely been acknowledged as a global cultural movement, little attention has been given to women’s participation in hip hop culture in various parts of the world or how this participation interacts with and impacts the lives of other women. Hip Hop Harem is the first book solely dedicated to female rap artists in the Middle East and North Africa region. Throughout the book, Angela S. Williams explores the work of seven prominent rappers from the region. Through the lens of hip hop feminism, she seeks to express how the artists’ work affects female audience members who relate to themes of self-determination and liberation within their own lives. The popular imagery of the harem is flipped, turned on its head in likely hip hop fashion, as the artists speak back to voices of male dominance and a power structure that has sought to define them and the region.
Restricted access

Series:

Steve Hallock

As the first volume of this two-part study established, major newspapers across the United States used framing and gatekeeping to shape the narratives of the tumultuous civil rights movement. Beginning with the landmark 1954 U.S. Supreme Court Brown v. Board of Education decision and the subsequent battle over desegregating a Little Rock high school, and continuing through the 1960 lunch-counter sit-ins, the next year’s freedom rides, and the 1963 Birmingham demonstrations, these newspapers helped set the agenda in their reportage of the movement. This second volume opens with the deadly September 1963 terrorist bombing of an African-American church in Birmingham, which crushed the euphoria that civil-rights crusaders had experienced after the 1963 March on Washington. What followed—including the mob violence and police brutality at Selma, the migration of race riots northward and westward, the rise of the Black Panther Party, and the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.—confirms the findings of the first volume. Major newspapers, in their coverage, painted starkly differing versions of the same incidents and events. The book contrasts a Northern and Western press more sympathetic to the civil rights crusade with Southern newspapers that depicted a South victimized by violent outside agitators bent on tearing down Southern culture and norms. Amid the current volatile climate of our politics, this study underscores the power of language in constructing our immediate and distant reality.