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Verleger als Leser und als Vermittler von Lesekultur

Britische Verlegerkarrieren zwischen 1800 und 1926 unter besonderer Berücksichtigung lesebiographischer Ansätze

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Sandra Simon

Verlegerpersönlichkeiten, die das Profil ihrer Verlage entscheidend gestalteten und auf die Lesekultur ihrer Zeit einwirkten, prägten das Verlagswesen im neunzehnten Jahrhundert. Gegenstand der vorliegenden Publikation sind die vier britischen Verleger William (1800-1883) und Robert Chambers (1802-1871), C. Kegan Paul (1828-1902) sowie J. M. Dent (1849-1926). Im Rückgriff auf biographische Ansätze der Leserforschung und Verlagsgeschichte arbeitet die Autorin die konkreten Umstände der Lesesozialisation der Verleger, ihren Bezug zum Lesen und zum Buch sowie die Auswirkungen auf das Selbstverständnis der Verleger und ihren Einfluss auf die Lesekultur ihrer Zeit heraus.

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Tomasz Sawczuk

The book is the first monograph which examines the correspondences between the oeuvre of Jack Kerouac and the thought of Jacques Lacan, the two apparently incompatible worlds which prove to be complementary when taking a closer look. The study demonstrates a number of points. Firstly, with Jacques Lacan as a silent partner, it helps to better understand why psychoanalysis won Kerouac’s enmity in the mid-1950s. It also delves into Lacan’s reflections on spontaneous free-association to prove their convergence with Beats’ literary tactics. In its final part, by employing Lacanian theory, the book offers an extensive insight into Kerouac’s oeuvre to excavate the problematic status of the father figure, a crucial matter not yet given a rigorous critical attention.

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Edited by Arlene McAlister

A Critical Edition of Ruths Recompence by Richard Bernard presents Richard Bernard’s commentary on the book of Ruth, originally published in 1628, to the modern reader. Arlene McAlister’s introduction sets the work in its contemporary context and most significantly elucidates the issue of women’s conduct that arises from the biblical story and challenges Bernard and the preceding early modern Ruth commentators. The introduction details how the commentators have great difficulty in expounding Ruth’s approach to her kinsman Boaz on the threshing floor alone at night and request to him to marry her according to the levirate law. They find that this conduct is contrary to the voluminous women’s conduct literature of their own society. The introduction also addresses such issues as Bernard’s anti-Catholicism and surveys the interpretation of the book of Ruth prior to and in the early modern period. Ruths Recompence is further set in context by the annotations in this book. The annotations also illustrate how Bernard differs from or develops the discussions of preceding commentators.

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‘Experienc’d Age knows what for Youth is fit’?

Generational and Familial Conflict in British and Irish Drama and Theatre

Edited by Katarzyna Bronk-Bacon

Over the centuries, drama has been an influential and imaginative medium for presenting, analysing and offering ways of resolving real or fictional battles. This volume provides readers with a timely study of inter-generational conflicts and crises as seen through the eyes of male and female British and Irish playwrights from the medieval period to the twenty-first century. The contributions suggest that at the heart of inter-generational discord lies various crises between (the) age(d) and youth or, more generally, the idea of what is «old» and «new». The interaction and co-existence of age and youth in their embodied, symbolic or conceptual forms is the topic of this volume. The collection is built around the words «age(d)»/«young», which denote both the biological age of the characters and the more conceptual potential of these terms. Ultimately, the contributors to this collection of essays analyse not only the idea of inter-generationality within selected dramatic works but also inter-generational conflicts seen in clashes of cultures, artistic visions, concepts and aesthetic idea(l)s.

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In Cynara’s Shadow

Collected Essays on Ernest Dowson

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Edited by Alice Condé and Jessica Gossling

In the 120 years since the publication of his final poetry collection, Decorations: In Verse and Prose (1899), Ernest Dowson has become something of a Decadent legend, much anthologized and referenced in almost every study of English Decadent literature, but still is considered a minor figure of the fin de siècle. He is, in fact, an important intermediary between late nineteenth-century Decadence and literary Modernism. This first collection of critical essays devoted solely to Dowson draws him out of the shadows and acknowledges his talent and legacy. The essays in this volume by established and emergent Dowson scholars offer new perspectives on some of the most noteworthy aspects of Dowson’s oeuvre, including Catholicism and Paganism, desire and sexuality, space and place, his relationships with Decadent contemporaries including Paul Verlaine and Aubrey Beardsley, and his poetic resonance in twentieth-century literature and music.

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Edited by Fionna Barber, Heidi Hansson and Sara Dybris McQuaid

Ireland and the North is an edited collection of chapters engaging with the relationship between Ireland and the Nordic countries. As a spatial and geographical point of reference for the formation of political and cultural identities in Ireland, the idea of «the North» encourages the identification of overlooked connections between Ireland and the Nordic countries, which, like Ireland, are also small nation states on the periphery of Europe. Importantly, the book employs a double conceptualisation of «the North» to include Northern Ireland. Moving beyond the nation state as a key framework for analysis of human activity, this collection engages with the transnational and transcultural in a mapping of connectivity and exchange. Relationships explored are imaginary and material exchanges, civic and personal linkages, literary adaptation and appropriation, transfers of cultural artefacts, political institutions and ideas. Chapters are drawn from a wide-ranging field of study that includes art history, literary history and theory, archaeology, antiquarianism, and media studies in addition to political analysis. With three sections on Material Culture, Political Culture and Print Culture, the book moves beyond the predominant literary paradigm in Irish Studies to make a significant contribution to expanding and developing the field.

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Edited by Elisa Bizzotto

Mario Praz: Voice Centre Stage is the first collection of essays in English on Italian writer Mario Praz (1896-1982), a central figure of twentieth-century culture and international literary relations. Praz’s formidable oeuvre spanned six decades and covered such topics as comparative literature, interior design, history of art and culture, collecting, interart and intermedial studies, translation, journalism, travelling and autobiography. His colossal erudition encompassed an enthusiasm for the eccentric, the interstitial, the erotic and the macabre.

This book, based on pluri- and interdisciplinary critical approaches by a variety of specialists, sheds ample light on an author who still awaits full appreciation as a unique cross-cultural ‘voice inside the scene’ of literature and art.

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Curricular Innovations

LGBTQ Literatures and the New English Studies

Edited by William P. Banks and John Pruitt

Where others have explored the teaching of LGBTQ literature courses, Curricular Innovations: LGBTQ Literatures and the New English Studies explores the impact that queer writers and their works are having across the broader undergraduate curriculum of English departments, as well as beyond those department spaces. While courses that focus on queer texts provide more space for students to think about the complexities of queer lives, this book breaks out of the specialized LGBTQ classroom to consider how we might also restructure and reframe a diverse set of undergraduate courses by paying attention to the contributions that LGBTQ writers make. Beyond simply including a text or two to represent "difference," contributors to this volume take a more structural approach in order to demonstrate ways of theming or designing courses around language, desire, and sexuality. They also demonstrate what happens when queer texts are given freedom to shape other classroom spaces, discussions, and reading/writing practices. This collection offers a practical intervention into conversations about the purposes and places of LGBTQ literatures by making good on the challenges that queer theories have posed to higher education over the last forty years.

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Edited by Patrycja Austin and Elżbieta Rokosz-Piejko

The essays collected in this book touch upon—from a variety of perspectives—the question of how the understanding of what is human has changed in the twenty-first century. The authors, exploring the intersection between postcolonial theory, posthumanism and environmental studies, provide a wider reflection concerned with the changing perception of the human in the contemporary world and examine its literary representations. The literary works selected for analysis include those of Margaret Atwood, J. M. Coetzee, Lisa Jarnot, Amitav Gosh, Alain Mabanckou, Barbara Kingsolver, Philip K. Dick and William Shakespeare.

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'And Yet I Remember'

Ageing and Old(er) Age in English Drama between 1660 and the 1750s

Katarzyna Bronk-Bacon

«And Yet I Remember» explores representations of ageing and old age in English drama from 1660 to the 1750s. Within these approximately ninety years, England witnessed significant developments in medicine and the advent of sentimental philosophy, which began to transform attitudes toward old age and ageing. This study discusses the enduring cultural and literary stereotyping of old(er) people in culture and drama of this period. The chapters are organised around the stereotypes that kept reappearing in cultural, medical and religious narratives on old age, namely the desiring old man (senex amans) and woman (the «lusty old widow») and the nostalgic and wise elder. Exploring many diverse storylines between 1660 and the 1750s that treat old age and present old(er) characters, the analyses in this study further show how the choice of genre, personal experiences and attitudes of the playwright, and political and cultural revolutions affected the representation of older people.