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Narry F. Santos

 The social values of honor and shame, which have attracted much research from cultural anthropology and New Testament studies for the past five decades, is the main focus of the book. This book proposes the need to combine major contributions of narrative, rhetorical, and cultural anthropological approaches to trace the development of the twofold honor-shame concept throughout the Marcan narrative—with special attention to family relations. Though adequate social-scientific and socio-rhetorical studies in Mark’s Gospel (even in relation to honor and shame) have been conducted, there are still few scholarly monographs that trace the honor-shame motifs from the start to the end of the narrative through the use of helpful insights from literary methods and heuristic models (e.g., challenge-riposte; patron–client relation). Thus, this book seeks to undertake this kind of research. If argues further that Mark intends to reverse the content of the honor-shame value system of his audience by means of narrative reversal and family relativization. Such dramatic redefinition basically turns this value system upside-down, especially in relation to the natural family and the new fictive family of Jesus. Finally, the book unpacks how Mark persuades his readers to reverse their value system—what they consider as shameful must now be valued as honorable, and what they view as honorable must now be seen as dishonorable. NT scholars, seminary professors, and graduate students will benefit from reading this book, which offers a fresh integrated honor–shame approach in studying Mark’s Gospel from start to finish.

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Edited by Cyril Levitt and Sabine Sander

This posthumously published work by Lawrence Krader surveys the study of myths from ancient times (classical Greece and Rome, Egypt, Babylonian, Akkadian, Sumerian, Chinese) from the Biblican traditions, from the indigenous peoples of the Americas and Australia, and from Northeastern and Central Asia.The book covers the various approaches to the study of myth from ancient times through Europe in the Middle Ages, in the Renaissance and Enlightenment, in the Romantic movement in the late eighteenth and early to mid-nineteenth century, among the evolutionists of the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century, and the structuralists, and hermeneutic approaches as well as linguistics. The book covers the treatment of myth from the inside that is from the experience of those committed to the myth and from the outside or those ethnologists, philosophers, and other students of myth who are outsiders. This treatment takes up the theme of esoteric and exoteric myths as it rejects some of the assumptions and approaches to the study of myth in the past while singling out others for approval and inclusion in the general theory of myth. Interestingly, it includes a discussion of myth in science and in infinitesimal mathematics. And, it considers the relationship between myth and ideology in the twentieth century in relation to politics and power. It both incorporates and broadens Krader’s theory of nature as a manifold consisting of different orders which he developed in his magnum opus Noetics: The Science of Thinking and Knowing.

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Deuteronomy–Joshua

A Hypertextual Commentary

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Bartosz Adamczewski

This monograph demonstrates that the book of Deuteronomy is a result of highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the book of Ezekiel. Likewise, it shows that the books of Joshua–Judges, taken together, are a result of one, highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the book of Deuteronomy. In both cases, the detailed reworking consists of almost 700 strictly sequentially organized thematic, and at times also linguistic correspondences. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on the earlier works explains numerous surprising features of Deuteronomy and Joshua–Judges. This critical analysis of Deuteronomy and Joshua–Judges sheds entirely new light on the question of the origin of the Pentateuch and the whole Israelite Heptateuch Genesis–Judges.

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Droit à la rémunération juste et à la protection sociale du clergé diocésain

Étude historico-canonique du can. 281, §§ 1-2. Dans la perspective de la prise en charge de l’Église particulière par elle-même en République Démocratique du Congo

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Crispin Kabeya Kipana

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Religion, Interreligious Learning and Education

Edited and revised by L. Philip Barnes, King’s College London

Karlo Meyer

How pupils can learn from different religions and the principles that guide pedagogy in this area are important issues that are common to religious education as practised in different places and locations. Such issues raise questions about the proper understanding of religion, of perspectivity and of how to identify and distinguish the aims and goals of religious education. The focus of this book is on inter-religious learning, i.e. learning beyond the boundaries of one religion, which is now an almost universally accepted practice in Western Europe.

"The book clarifies the foundations of inter-religious learning; it illuminates the relevant discussions and is oriented ... towards practice – and with meeting the complex requirements of interfaith learning. Karlo Meyer has written an important reference work in this field."

Prof. Dr. Thorsten Knauth, University of Duisburg-Essen

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Exodus–Numbers

A Hypertextual Commentary

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Bartosz Adamczewski

This monograph demonstrates that the books of Exodus–Numbers, taken together, are the result of one, highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the book of Deuteronomy. This detailed reworking consists of around 1,200 strictly sequentially organized matter, and at times also linguistic correspondences between Exodus–Numbers and Deuteronomy. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on Deuteronomy explains numerous surprising features of Exodus–Numbers. The critical analysis of Exodus–Numbers as a coherently composed hypertextual work disproves hypotheses of the existence in these writings of Priestly and non-Priestly materials or multiple literary layers.

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Patterns of Movement in the Hebrew Psalter

A Holistic Thematic Approach with an Exemplar, Psalms 69–87

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Yung Hun Choi

The author re-examines the movements in the Hebrew Psalter as a whole, "from laments to praises" and "from psalms of individual to those of community," indicated by Westermann (1977) and Gottwald (1985). In general, these movements are widely observable, however, there are some contradictory data upon closer inspection. Namely, some laments are assembled at the end and in fact many psalms of community appear in the middle. This motivated the author to launch a holistic structural study. In this book, the author demonstrates that the movements are not specified in a linear design but a progressive parallel pattern, crossing over the fivefold doxological division. The movements foreshadowed between Psalms 1 and 2 unfold in the specific psalms-groups and in the tripartite division. Each psalms-group exhibits the movements "from distress (lament) through deepest sorrow to joy (praise)," "from individual (through Israel) to nations," "from present/past to future," "from (the city of) Israel through Sheol/death to Zion," "from Mosaic covenant to Davidic one" and "from the flawed human (Davidic) kingship through Messianic to YHWH’s kingship." The "answer and certainty" of Psalms 1–2 reappear at the end of each group. A psalms-group, Pss 69–87, was selected as an exemplar to demonstrate the regularity of the movements.

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Jarosław Duraj

This project envisages a study of Eric Voegelin (1901-1985) and of the role played by metaxy in his vision of political philosophy. Metaxy already defined by Plato as the "in-between" matrix of the human condition is for Voegelin a powerful notion that symbolizes the intermediate state in which man experiences diverse and opposing tensions such as the ones between immanence and transcendence or mortality and immortality. The metaxy constitutes the realm of the divine-human mutual participation (methexis), and its locus resides in human consciousness (nous), there where the divine reality manifests itself as the origin of being. Being the field of intermediation between opposing forces, man has to keep the balance of consciousness in order to differentiate the noetic and pneumatic dimensions and so attune his life to the divine ground of being. This project claims that for Voegelin metaxy shapes the possibility of the philosophical, historical, political and religious orientation in life. Indeed, Voegelin’s approach deserves recognition as an option adequate for addressing the intellectual challenges engendered by modern and postmodern philosophies.

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Genesis

A Hypertextual Commentary

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Bartosz Adamczewski

This monograph demonstrates that the book of Genesis is a result of highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the book of Deuteronomy. This detailed reworking consists of around 1,000 strictly sequentially organized matter, and at times also linguistic correspondences between Genesis and Deuteronomy. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on Deuteronomy explains numerous surprising features of Genesis. The critical analysis of Genesis as a coherently composed hypertextual work disproves hypotheses of the existence in these writings of Priestly and non-Priestly materials or multiple literary layers.

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Cyril Aigbadon Odia