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Breast Cancer Inside Out

Bodies, Biographies, & Beliefs

Edited by Kimberly R. Myers

Forthcoming
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Medical Humanities

Criticism and Creativity

Edited by Maria Vaccarella and Kimberly R. Myers

This series showcases innovative research, creativity and pedagogy in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Books in the series explore the complexities of human bodies, minds, illness and wellbeing through analytical frameworks derived from humanistic disciplines and clinical practice. The series is intended to provide an informative exchange across disciplines, contributing to debates on health-related issues from a broad range of perspectives. In addition to research monographs and edited collections, the series includes creative works as well as pedagogical texts, thus encouraging personal and theoretical reflections on the condition of the human mind/body. The series embraces the intersection of healthcare and the humanities, in its practical, theoretical, creative and educational expressions.

The series serves as a venue for publishing a range of materials: research monographs and edited collections on critical approaches to medical issues in culture; creative works that engage with medical humanities themes, accompanied by critical and educational materials; and critical, engaged or radical pedagogies on focused topics and/or for learners in the medical humanities. The series also invites research that opens up critical conversations on being human at the intersection of other forms of new humanistic knowledge, such as environmental or digital humanities. We are especially interested in collaborations between academics in the humanities and healthcare professionals.

All book proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed prior to publication. We publish in both print and electronic format. Open Access publication is particularly welcome.

Editorial Board: Havi Carel (University of Bristol), Gretchen Case (University of Utah School of Medicine), Siobhan Conaty (La Salle University), Cheryl Dellasega (Penn State College of Medicine), Daniel George (Penn State College of Medicine), Michael Green (Penn State College of Medicine), Jennifer Henneman (Denver Art Museum), Brian Hurwitz (King’s College London), Brian Johnsrud (Khan Academy), Tess Jones (University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus), Lois Leveen (Novelist and independent scholar), Ulrika Maude (University of Bristol), Gavin Miller (University of Glasgow), Jules Odendahl-James (Duke University), Molly Osborne (Oregon Health and Science University), Barry Saunders (University of North Carolina School of Medicine), Johanna Shapiro (University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine), Marina Tsaplina (The Betes Organization), Craigan Usher (Oregon Health and Science University), Neil Vickers (King’s College London), Martin Willis (Cardiff University), Charlotte Wu (Boston University School of Medicine)

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Edited by Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Forthcoming
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Edited by Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

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Edited by Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

Forthcoming
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Edited by Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

This series seeks to publish critical and nuanced scholarship in the field of Black European Studies. Moving beyond and building on the Black Atlantic approach, books in this series will underscore the existence, diversity and evolution of Black Europe. They will provide historical, intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives on how Black diasporic peoples have reconfigured the boundaries of Black identity making, claim making and politics; created counterdiscourses and counterpublics on race, colonialism, postcolonialism and racism; and forged transnational connections and solidarities across Europe and the globe. The series will also illustrate the ways that Black European diasporic peoples have employed intellectual, socio-political, artistic/cultural, affective, digital and pedagogical work to aid their communities and causes, challenge their exclusion and cultivate ties with their allies, thus gaining recognition in their societies and beyond.

Representing the field’s dynamic growth methodologically, geographically and culturally, the series will also collectively interrogate notions of Blackness, Black diasporic culture and Europeanness while also challenging the boundaries of Europe. Books in the series will critically examine how race and ethnicity intersect with the themes of gender, nationality, class, religion, politics, kinship, sexuality, affect and the transnational, offering comparative and international perspectives. One of the main goals of the series is to introduce and produce rigorous academic research that connects not only with individuals in academia but also with a broader public.

Areas of interest:

  • Social movements
  • Racial discourses and politics
  • Empire, slavery and colonialism
  • Decolonialization and postcolonialism
  • Gender, sexuality and intersectionality
  • Black activism (in all its forms)
  • Racial and political violence and surveillance
  • Racial constructions
  • Diasporic practices
  • Race and racialization in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary eras
  • Identity, representation and cultural productions (music, art, literature, etc.)
  • Memory
  • Migration and immigration
  • Citizenship
  • State building and diplomacy
  • Nations and nationalisms

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Advisory Board: Hakim Adi (Chichester), Robbie Aitken (Sheffield Hallam), Catherine Baker (Hull), Eddie Bruce-Jones (Birkbeck), Alessandra Di Maio (Palermo), Akwugo Emejulu (Warwick), Philomena Essed (Antioch), Crystal Fleming (Stony Brook), David Theo Goldberg (UC Irvine), Silke Hackenesch (Cologne), Elahe Haschemi Yekani (Humboldt), Nicholas Jones (Bucknell), Silyane Larcher (CNRS), Olivette Otele (Bath Spa), Sue Peabody (Washington State), Kennetta Perry (De Montfort), Cassander L. Smith (Alabama), S. A. Smythe (UCLA)

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Edited by Dafydd Sills-Jones and Pietari Kääpä

This series provides a space for exploring the development of documentary film cultures in the contemporary context. The series takes an ecological approach to the study of documentary funding, production, distribution and consumption by emphasizing the interconnections between these practices and those of other media systems. It thus encourages new ways of understanding documentary films or practices as part of other, wider systems of cultural production.

Volumes may focus on specific sociopolitical environments, such as that of a nation or region. Alternatively, they may explore specific themes or production practices, such as new wave documentaries, environmentalism or indigenous film communities. Studies of shared technological platforms, including films that make use of embodied technologies or using emergent distribution platforms, are also welcome.

The series reflects not only the maturing of literature on documentary film and media production studies over the last two decades but also the growing interest amongst nonacademic and professional audiences in documentary texts as they occupy an increasingly hybrid cultural space: part journalism, part art cinema, part activism, part entertainment, part digital culture.

 

Editorial Board: Jouko Aaltonen (Aalto University), John Corner (Liverpool University, UK), Yingchi Chu (Murdoch University, Australia), Jonathan Dovey (University of the West of England, Bristol), Susanna Helke (Aalto University, Finland), Anette Hill (Lund University, Sweden), Bert Hogenkamp (Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision), Ilona Hongisto (Macquarie University, Australia), K. P. Jayasankar (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, India), Susan Kerrigan (Newcastle University, Australia), Richard Kilborn (University of Stirling), Erik Knudsen (University of Central Lancashire, UK), David MacDougall (Australian National University), Anjali Monteiro (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai), Pablo Piedras (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina), Agnieszka Piotrowska (University of Bedfordshire, UK), Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork, Ireland), Belinda Smaill (Monash University, Australia), Inge Sorensen (University of Glasgow, UK), Bjørn Sørenssen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway), Malin Walhberg (Stockholm University, Sweden), Deane Williams (Monash University, Australia), Yingjin Zhang (UC San Diego, USA)

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Dafydd Sills-Jones, Jouko Aaltonen and Pietari Kaapa

Forthcoming
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Series:

David Manning

Forthcoming.
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Edited by David Manning

This new book series will show that a critical understanding of religious pluralism in the past is of vital significance to debates about identity, diversity, and co-existence in the present. Studies will focus on using a historical perspective to address one of three key themes in the period between 1500 and 2000 CE: intra-religious pluralism; inter-religious pluralism; or, religion, secularism, and the nation state. Within this frame of reference, constructive contrasts between a wide range of foci, approaches, and viewpoints will be keenly encouraged. The series will champion established lines of research in political, social, cultural, and gendered histories of religious pluralism – e.g. studies on liberty, persecution, and toleration – whilst also encouraging novel ways of transcending a scholarly discourse which is dominated by ideologies and methodologies derived from the social sciences – e.g. by studies on the theological and literary dimensions of conflict, cohesion, and community. The series will embrace scholarship on subjects from any part of the world. European and extra-European perspectives that complement traditional Anglo-American thinking are particularly welcome.

As the ‘global turn’ continues to energize new types of enquiry, the series will also seek to advance studies of indigenous and displaced religious groups. With this scope there is a reflexive acknowledgement that the rationale for and defining concepts of the series are grounded in a ‘western’ intellectual tradition; however, this should serve as a challenge to prospective authors to pioneer new dialogues between ‘western’ and ‘non-western’ approaches and foci, or even surpass the dichotomy altogether. An emphasis will be given to promoting the best research of early career scholars from around the world, whilst also giving more established academics the opportunity to develop their multimedia policy-orientated work – e.g. podcasts, blogs, talks, press briefings, reports for thinktanks, governments, and public agencies etc. – into a book that would engage peers and students alike.

In association with Cambridge Institute on Religion and International Studies