Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,182 items for :

  • Media and Communication x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Moving Sounds

A Cultural History of the Car Radio

Edited by Phylis Johnson and Ian Punnett

Moving Sounds: A Cultural History of the Car Radio explores the unique animating symbiosis that develops whenever previously unrelated technologies become intertwined and form a mutually invigorating relationship. When “car” and “radio” became permanently inculcated, it changed how both cars and radio were designed and experienced. Moving Sounds is the first book-length study exploring the relationship between the car and the radio. While much scholarship has been devoted to the general history of radio, radio’s unique relationship with the open road has been largely overlooked. The nascent interconnectivity between the early car and radio developers, and what they did to help each other, is another aspect of cultural history that is explored in Moving Sounds.

Restricted access

Make America Meme Again

The Rhetoric of the Alt-Right

Series:

Heather Suzanne Woods and Leslie A. Hahner

As demonstrated by the 2016 Presidential Election, memes have become the suasory tactic par excellence for the promotional and recruitment efforts of the Alt-right. Memes are not simply humorous shorthands, or pithy assertions, but play a significant role in the machinations of politics and in how the public comes to understand and respond to their government and compatriots. Using the tools of rhetorical criticism, Woods and Hahner detail how memetic persuasion operates, with a particular focus on the 2016 election of Donald J. Trump. Make America Meme Again: The Rhetoric of the Alt-right reveals the rhetorical principles used to design Alt-right memes, outlining the myriad ways memes lure mainstream audiences to a number of extremist claims. In particular, Make America Meme Again argues that Alt-right memes impact the culture of digital boards and a broader public culture by stultifying discourse and thereby shaping how publics congeal. Woods and Hahner demonstrate that memes are a mechanism that proliferate white nationalism and exclusionary politics by spreading algorithmically through network cultures in ways that are often difficult to discern. Alt-right memes thus present a significant threat to democratic praxis, one that can begin to be combatted through a rigorous rhetorical analysis of their power and influence. Make America Meme Again illuminates the function of networked persuasion for scholars and practitioners of rhetoric, media, and communication; political theorists; digital humanists; and anyone who has ever seen, crafted, or proliferated a meme.

Restricted access

Defining Literacy Standards

Essays on Assessment, Inclusion, Pedagogy and Civic Engagement

Series:

Edited by Ronald A. Sudol and Alice S. Horning

As individual institutions of education at all levels respond to the call for greater accountability and assessment, those who teach literacy face the challenging task of choosing what to measure and how to measure it. Both defining literacy clearly and tying that definition to strategies for assessment are two of many challenges faced by educators, theorists, and members of the public who assume responsibility for assessing literacy as well as developing and improving literacy programs. In a pluralistic and democratic society sensitive to multicultural variation, we need to find our way between the competing needs for inclusiveness and for clear and useful standards. Multiple definitions of literacy raise the issue of whether there can be a standard or set of standards and if so, what they are in an environment of multiple literacies. Indeed, the downside of the defeat of older monolithic notions of literacy is the undermining or at least the questioning of well-established methods of literacy assessment. To some extent, the older methods of assessment have been revised in the light of more expansive definitions of literacy. But will this kind of revision be enough? How are the criteria for judgment to be known and applied? Thus, this volume addresses the problems of assessing literacy development in the context of multiple and inclusive definitions. Each section consists of chapters that deal with the issue of definitions per se, with standards in postsecondary settings, with the K-12 situation, and with alternative, non-school environments where literacy is critical to human functioning in a democratic society.

Restricted access

Intra-Regional Popular Cultural Flows

Towards an East Asian Identity?

Edited by Xin Chen and Nicholas Tarling

This edited volume brings together scholars from eight countries to explore interactions of popular cultural flows, state politics, audiences’ receptions, and public debates in Singapore, Malaysia, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam and China, and across the region as a whole. These investigations provide fresh conceptual and empirical insights into the study of the dynamic and complex interface of cultural adaptation, political identification and regional identity formation in the popular cultural consumption process in East Asia. The impact of cross-border popular cultural flows on East Asians’ competing national selves and the potential of translating pleasure from popular cultural consumption into regional integration urges are thus issues carrying political significance and consequence for East Asia, and possibly with serious repercussions on the world.

Restricted access

Edited by Ceylan Yegen and Nurettin Güz

The digital era we are in is presenting a series of innovations every day. Today, technology is becoming a decisive factor in everyday life as well as in professional life. Every day, new media, which develop at a fast pace, influence many areas from everyday relations to professions and transform media. For example, the traditional media today has to adapt to new communication technologies and new media-based platforms. However, new forms of journalism and their tendencies are the ones that have a negative effect on the traditional media. Therefore, it is important to understand the situation of the traditional media in the new media age. This book will serve as a guide to understanding the new media – which stand as a great power against the traditional media today – as well as the structure of its environments and its potentialities.

Restricted access

Place, Power, Media

Mediated Responses to Globalization

Edited by Divya McMillin, Joost de Bruin and Jo Smith

Place, Power, Media: Mediated Responses to Globalization is a compelling, interdisciplinary exploration of how media practices and communication rituals are connected to larger economic, social, and political processes in a globalizing world. Through a rich variety of media texts, authors examine how daily, mundane, and interpersonal processes help shape ‘our’ place in the world, a placement that is integrally connected to social relations at the global level. Denoting a sense of geography as well as demarcating diverse social positionings, place is understood as the result of historical and contemporary discourses occurring on a range of scales and within different cultural, aesthetic, and political contexts. The authors argue that the construction, restoration, configuration, and representation of place is an important project at multiple levels; what meanings are derived from it, what meanings are infused, who the key players are, what power struggles are inherent—these issues offer rich areas of study for global media scholars interested in the place-making powers of media.

Restricted access

Debating Migration as a Public Problem

National Publics and Transnational Fields

Series:

Edited by Camelia Beciu, Mălina Ciocea, Irina Diana Mădroane and Alexandru I. Cârlan

This volume identifies empirical sites and methodological frames for approaching the construction of migration as a public problem. Starting from the premise that transnationalism becomes structural in setting the public agenda, the authors explore topics and arguments on migration in media and political discourses, as well as the ways migrants and non-migrants recontextualize these discourses in the process of making sense of migration, as a matter of citizenship and policy action.

Restricted access

Human-Machine Communication

Rethinking Communication, Technology, and Ourselves

Series:

Edited by Andrea L. Guzman

From virtual assistants to social robots, people are increasingly interacting with intelligent and highly communicative technologies throughout their daily lives. This shift from communicating with people to communicating with people and machines challenges how scholars have theorized and studied communication. Human-Machine Communication: Rethinking Communication, Technology, and Ourselves addresses this transition in how people communicate and who, or what, they communicate with and the implications of this evolution for communication research. Geared toward scholars interested in people’s interactions with technology, this book serves as an introduction to human-machine communication (HMC) as a specific area of study within communication (encompassing human-computer interaction, human-robot interaction, and human-agent interaction) and to the research possibilities of HMC. This collection includes papers presented as part of a scholarly conference on HMC, along with invited works from noted researchers. Topics include defining HMC, theoretical approaches to HMC, applications of HMC, and the larger implications of HMC for self and society. The research presented here focuses on people’s interactions with multiple technologies (artificial intelligence, algorithms, and robots) used within different contexts (home, workplace, education, journalism, and healthcare) from a variety of epistemological and methodological approaches (empirical, rhetorical, and critical/cultural). Overall, Human-Machine Communication provides readers with an understanding of HMC in a way that supports and promotes further scholarly inquiry in a growing area of communication research.

Restricted access

Poaching Politics

Online Communication During the 2016 US Presidential Election

Series:

Paul Booth, Amber Davisson, Aaron Hess and Ashley Hinck

The 2016 US election was ugly, divisive, maddening, and influential. In this provocative new book, Paul Booth, Amber Davisson, Aaron Hess, and Ashley Hinck explore the effect that everyday people had on the political process. From viewing candidates as celebrities, to finding fan communities within the political spectrum, to joining others online in spreading (mis)information, the true influence in 2016 was the online participant.

Poaching Politics brings together research and scholars from media studies, political communication, and rhetoric to provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the role of participatory cultures in shaping the 2016 US presidential election. Poaching Politics heralds a new way of creating and understanding shifts in the nature of political communication in the digital age.

Restricted access

Muslim Women and White Femininity

Reenactment and Resistance

Haneen Shafeeq Ghabra

Muslim Women and White Femininity: Reenactment and Resistance is a much-needed book in a time when Muslim women are speaking out but also embodying White femininity. This book focuses on how Whiteness travels through Muslim women’s bodies, who in turn reenact or resist White womanhood, by examining three relevant archetypes: the Oppressed, the Advocate, and the Humanitarian Leader. The author aims to demonstrate the necessity of archetypal criticism as a method that can teach the reader or student how to deconstruct dominant discourses in the media. This book aims to address intercultural, gender, intersectional and critical communication courses but is also suited for those in the general public who wish to understand the deceptive nature of the media. Thus, at a time where Muslim women are being used as media objects by Western media, this book is crucial in analyzing how readers can begin to uncover dominant ideologies that are carried through and by Muslim women.