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Millennials, News, and Social Media

Is News Engagement a Thing of the Past? Revised and Updated 2nd Edition

Paula M. Poindexter

Five years after the first edition of Millennials, News, and Social Media: Is News Engagement a Thing of the Past? was published, a focus on the Millennial generation’s relationship with news is more important than ever. This revised and updated book reports the results of a new survey that reveals changes in news consumption habits and attitudes while painting a detailed portrait of Millennials in a news media landscape now dominated by social media and mobile devices.

Generational, racial, ethnic, and gender differences in news engagement and social media use are examined and so is the historic presidential election that the oldest and youngest Millennials experienced. How Millennials voted, the issues that mattered, and the relationship between their political identity and news is also explored. The spread of fake news, attacks on the press, and the need for news literacy are also discussed.

Since the publication of the book’s first edition, Snapchat and digital subscriptions have emerged and social media sites have become popular platforms for news. How Millennials have responded to these changes in the media landscape is also examined.

Finally, recommendations for further improvement of news coverage of Millennials are proposed. Plus, the book underscores how all segments of society, including news organizations, journalism schools, and tech companies, can work toward a more informed and news literate society, a requirement for viable democracies.

This revised and updated book will appeal to students, scholars, journalists, and everyone who cares about informed and civically engaged citizens and a strong democracy.

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Interventions

Communication Research and Practice

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Edited by Adrienne Shaw and D. Travers Scott

This volume brings together a range of papers that fruitfully engage with the theme of the 2017 Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, held in San Diego, California: Interventions. Here "intervention" points to a range of communication practices that engage with a political event, social phenomena, industrial or socio-cultural practice, in order to alter and disrupt events and the norms and practices that contribute to their occurrence.  Interventions prohibit events from proceeding in a "normal" course. Interventions approach or critique practices and phenomenon resulting from tensions or absences occurring in: events, structures, (institutional governmental, media industry), discourses, and socio-cultural and subcultural events. Intervention presents the opportunity to explore boundaries, assumptions and strategies that appear to be different or irreconcilable, viewing them instead as possibilities for productive engagements. Communication interventions—in both research and practice—insert insights from diverse voices, marginal positions, emerging organizational practices and digital technologies, to broaden and enrich dialogue. Interventions bring complex reframings to events and phenomenon. Interventions seek to alter a course and effect changed practices in a range of spheres: governmental and social institutions, cultural and nongovernmental groups; industry and organizational life, new media and digital spaces, socio-cultural environments, subcultural groups, health environments, affective and behavioral life, and in everyday life.

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Mediated Girlhoods

New Explorations of Girls' Media Culture, Volume 2

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Edited by Morgan Genevieve Blue and Mary Celeste Kearney

Mediated Girlhoods, Volume 2 is an anthology devoted to scholarship on girls’ media culture. Taking a cultural studies approach, it includes studies of girls’ media representations, girls’ media consumption, and girls’ media production. In an attempt to push research on girls’ media culture in new directions, it responds to criticisms of previous research in this field by including studies of girls who are not white, middle-class, heterosexual, cisgender, or Western. Approaching girlhood, media, and methodology broadly, Mediated Girlhoods includes studies of such previously unexplored topics as girls’ mimetic communication via Tumblr, the girlyboy in independent Filipino cinema, Qatari girls’ film production, trans girlhood in advertising, Canadian girls’ feminist activism, and the new girl subject imagined in Disney’s Cinderella (2015).

Mediated Girlhoods, Volume 2 is appropriate for undergraduate- and graduate-level courses, particularly graduate seminars exploring girlhood, media, and culture; youth media; youth cultures; and gender and media; and undergraduate courses housed within the following departments: media studies, communication studies, cultural studies, women’s and gender studies, sociology, literature, history, education, and psychology.

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Communicology for the Human Sciences

Lanigan and the Philosophy of Communication

Andrew R. Smith, Isaac E. Catt and Igor E. Klyukanov

Winner of the National Communication Association 2018 Philosophy of Communication Division Top Edited Book Award

This edited volume develops the philosophy of communication inspired by the scholarship of Richard L. Lanigan, with emphasis on communicology as a human science. Lanigan’s syntheses of the philosophies of speech, language and discourse stemming from the works of Edmund Husserl, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, Charles Sanders Peirce, Roman Jakobson, Umberto Eco, Pierre Bourdieu, Jurgen Reusch and Gregory Bateson, and many others offers a compelling framework for systematic analysis of human communication in all domains of lived experience. His work defines the theory and method of the human sciences in general and the discipline of communicology in particular. The focus in this collection is on the theoretical and methodological foundations for semiotic phenomenology whereby communication is recognized as constitutive of all human conscious experience and social relationships, involving gestural, nonverbal, discursive, performative, artistic, poetic and mass mediated forms.

The volume is divided into five thematic sections: Founding(s), which marks out primary influences on communicology conceived as a human science; Tropologic(s), which reveals how abduction, adduction and semiosis are essential for understanding human conduct in multiple forms of expression; Trans/formations, which addresses problems of change in self-other relations advancing an ethical life; Voicing Bodies/Embodied Voices, which elaborates the reversible relations between body and voice, and voice and world; and Horizons of Communicability, which takes up operative intentionalities that typically escape human conscious experience. All chapters are original to this volume, written by leading international scholars in the philosophy of communication who cross several disciplinary boundaries in the human sciences.

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Conversing with Cancer

How to Ask Questions, Find and Share Information, and Make the Best Decisions

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Lisa Sparks and Anna Leahy

With more than 40% of people eventually facing a cancer diagnosis, Conversing with Cancer is a much-needed addition to understanding and improving cancer care through strong communication among providers, patients, and caregivers. Each person whose life is affected by a cancer diagnosis—patient, healthcare provider, caregiver—has information and needs information in order to make the best decisions possible under the circumstances. After studying and writing about the topics of communication and cancer for many years separately, authors Lisa Sparks and Anna Leahy combine their expertise in this new tour de force. Here, they apply principles from the field of health communication to the cancer care experience, drawing from a wide range of scholarship to offer a comprehensive view of cancer care communication and extend existing work into new insights. Engaging chapters cover all phases of the journey through cancer, from prevention to recovery or end-of-life; analyze the roles of the variety of cultural and social identities and relationships; and explore written, verbal, non-verbal, and electronic communication. In addition, this book draws from the real-life stories of cancer patients themselves to enrich the book’s unique discussions and to better understand how theory can be put into practice. Conversing with Cancer is ideal for use in health communication classes, medical and nursing programs, and formal caregiver training. In addition, it is useful for cancer patient and caregiver supports groups and for individual providers, patients, and caregivers.

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Digicrimination – Those are the Good Times

A New Type of Discrimination That Came with Digitization

H. Okan Tansu

Our society is highly effected by the digital revolution. This book describes with examples and new concepts the discrimination created by the Digital World at different layers of the society. The author analyzes the new technological ecosystem with components like the Digital Ghetto and describes the measures which need to be taken in the future. He evaluates this new digital world focusing on several aspects of social relations and lifestyles. The book also analyzes the mistakes made while entering the Information Age. Furthermore, the author answers the question if human society is ready for the amenities of services like Social Media, e-learning, energy and self-driving cars or if they actually make our lives more difficult and complicated.

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Edited by Philippe Bouquillion and François Moreau

The assessment of the challenges of digital platforms for cultural industries raises many different issues. How platforms choices in content pricing affect the overall value of cultural markets, especially in the case where content just aim at favoring devices’ sales? How are revenues shared between platforms and content right holders? Do creators and artists all benefit from the growth of digital platforms? How usual business models of cultural industries have to adapt to the digital paradigm? Should we observe rather a reinforcement of the star system or the emergence of a long tail? What is the impact on market concentration? Could we expect an increase or a decrease in cultural diversity? What is the role played by recommender systems, playlists and algorithms in influencing consumers’ choices? How to implement efficient public policies given the transnational dimension of digital platforms? The various papers gathered in this book contribute further to these different topics with a focus on empirical issues. The first part gathers the contributions dealing with the analysis of the impact that digital platforms have on the incumbent or legacy players of the original value chain of content industries: content providers, live entertainment producers, consumers, etc. The second part opens the black box of the ecosystem of digital platforms by studying competition among them and among the business models they adopt, as well as the conditions for the emergence of new players.

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Drones

Media Discourse and the Public Imagination

Kevin Howley

Drones: Media Discourse and the Public Imagination starts with a basic premise: technology shapes and is shaped by the stories we tell about it. Stories about drones—at once anxious and hopeful, fearful and awe-inspired—are emblematic of the profound ambivalence that frequently accompanies the introduction of new technologies. Through critical analysis of a variety of cultural forms—from newspaper headlines, nightly newscasts, and documentary films, to advertising, entertainment media, and graphic arts—this book demonstrates the prevalence of drones in global battlefields and domestic airspace, public discourse, and the popular imagination. Written in a lively, engaging, and accessible style, Kevin Howley argues that media discourse plays a decisive role in shaping these new technologies, understanding their application in various spheres of human activity, and integrating them into everyday life. In doing so, Howley highlights the relationship between discursive and material practice in the social construction of technology.

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From Tahrir Square to Ferguson

Social Networks as Facilitators of Social Movements

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Edited by Juliet Dee

The last several years have seen mass uprisings and dynamic social movements across the globe, from the onset of the Arab Spring in 2011, to the Black Lives Matter movement following Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014. There is no doubt that social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter accelerated and facilitated these uprisings, providing a way for people to organize and express themselves despite government repression.

From Tahrir Square to Ferguson: Social Networks as Facilitators of Social Movements attempts to answer the question of whether these movements could have succeeded before the advent of the Internet age. From political protest to regime change, social movements have become increasingly digital. Taking on the current political climate from an international perspective, From Tahrir Square to Ferguson: Social Networks as Facilitators of Social Movements attempts to address the issues of a growing social media audience facing a wide variety of social and political issues.

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Gatewatching and News Curation

Journalism, Social Media, and the Public Sphere

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Axel Bruns

Gatewatching and News Curation: Journalism, Social Media, and the Public Sphere documents an emerging news media environment that is characterised by an increasingly networked and social structure. In this environment, professional journalists and non-professional news users alike are increasingly cast in the role of gatewatcher and news curator, and sometimes accept these roles with considerable enthusiasm. A growing part of their everyday activities takes place within the spaces operated by the major social media providers, where platform features outside of their control affect how they can post, find, access, share, curate, and otherwise engage with news, rumours, analysis, comments, opinion, and related forms of information.

If in the current social media environment the majority of users are engaged in sharing news; if the networked structure of these platforms means that users observe and learn from each other’s sharing practices; if these practices result in the potential for widespread serendipitous news discovery; and if such news discovery is now overtaking search engines as the major driver of traffic to news sites—then gatewatching and news curation are no longer practiced only by citizen journalists, and it becomes important to fully understand the typical motivations, practices, and consequences of habitual news sharing through social media platforms.

Professional journalism and news media have yet to fully come to terms with these changes. The first wave of citizen media was normalised into professional journalistic practices—but this book argues that what we are observing in the present context instead is the normalisation of professional journalism into social media.