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Shaping International Public Opinion

A Model for Nation Branding and Public Diplomacy

Jami A. Fullerton and Alice Kendrick

Bridging two «camps» in the field of international public opinion – nation branding and public diplomacy – this book presents a first-of-its-kind cohesive framework with which readers can better research, teach, practice, and understand the field. At its core is the introduction of the Model of Country Concept, which illustrates the array of factors, including hard- and soft-power initiatives, that shape how global citizens form their opinions about other countries.

Each chapter applies the Model of Country Concept across a wide geographic, methodological, and disciplinary range of qualitative and quantitative research studies. They include traditional and social media content, international educational exchange programs, tourism, government-sponsored programs, and entertainment. By way of definitions, prior research findings, professional best practices, and published theories and models, the book offers a framework for future positioning of both practice around and research about nation branding and public diplomacy.

Written for practitioners, researchers, teachers, and students of public diplomacy, international relations, media/journalism, and strategic communication, among others, the book offers a comprehensive yet approachable solution for framing a conversation about the heterodox nature of nation branding and public diplomacy, and advances the field through original research.

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Political Animals

News of the Natural World

Alec Charles

Newspapers have long been enthralled by accounts of cute, cuddly, strange, dangerous and endangered beasts, and by extraordinary and sometimes apocryphal narratives of natural phenomena. This study explores the incidence of several such stories in the British press: from reports of the "ethnic" conflicts between different species of squirrel to the tragedy of Cecil the slaughtered Zimbabwean lion. It takes in, along the way, the celebrity of Knut the polar bear, the Tamworth Two and the Exmoor Emperor. It surveys the media representation of the natural landscape from the crocodile-infested reaches of the River Thames out as far as the bleak wastes of the former planet Pluto. In doing so, and in conversation with reporters and players in these tales, it investigates the political subtexts and social meanings of such stories, and seeks thereby to reveal the real value of such soft, sentimental and sometimes silly news.
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Mehmet Ali Icbay, Hasan Arslan and Francesco Sidoti

This book is a collection of papers written by researchers, lawyers, administrators, analysts and graduate students working and doing research in the field of law, communication and arts. The topics include women rights in Turkey, witness statement as evidence in Turkish law, legal regulations about organ or tissue trafficking, the new social movements in Turkey, humorous discourse on social media or the traditional country fairs in Turkey.

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James W. Carey and Communication Research

Reputation at the University’s Margins

Jefferson D. Pooley

Winner of the 2017 James W. Carey Media Research Award

James W. Carey, by the time of his death in 2006, was a towering figure in communication research in the U.S. In this book, Pooley provides a critical introduction to Carey’s work, tracing the evolution of his media theorizing from his graduate school years through to the publication in 1989, of his landmark Communication as Culture. The book is an attempt to understand the unusual if also undeniable significance that Carey holds for so many communication scholars, as well as making his work accessible to advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students.

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Kamila Ciepiela

The central focus of the book is the identification of the ways people engage in communicative encounters to (re)constitute personal and social identities. Its aim is to identify some principal themes that have emerged from the ample research on identity in a variety of contexts. A common thread of the articles is the role of language in the construction and performance of identities. It embraces an exploration of the sociocultural environments in which human communication takes place, the interplay between these environments, and the construction and display of identities through our communicative performances. Research located in a range of literary, sociological, psychological and linguistic perspectives is used to illustrate the potential of communication in establishing a sense of identity.

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What Do We Really Know About Herta Herzog?

Exploring the Life and Work of a Pioneer of Communication Research

Elisabeth Klaus and Josef Seethaler

The book for the first time explores in-depth the life and work of Herta Herzog (1910–2010), an Austrian-American social psychologist. Herzog spent most of her working life in the United States, where she moved to in the 1930s, following her first husband Paul Lazarsfeld into migration and working with him at the famous Office of Radio Research in Princeton and Columbia. The chapters by scholars from the U.S., Israel, Germany and Austria show the amazing scope of Herzog’s work as both, one of the founders of empirical communication research and the "grand dame" of market and motivation research. Herzog crossed many borders, moving from Europe to the U.S. and back again, stepping over disciplinary lines as well as restrictions by gender.

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Digital Contagions

A Media Archaeology of Computer Viruses, Second Edition

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Jussi Parikka

Now in its second edition, Digital Contagions is the first book to offer a comprehensive and critical analysis of the culture and history of the computer virus.
At a time when our networks arguably feel more insecure than ever, the book provides an overview of how our fears about networks are part of a more complex story of the development of digital culture. It writes a media archaeology of computer and network accidents that are endemic to the computational media ecology. Viruses, worms, and other software objects are not seen merely from the perspective of anti-virus research or practical security concerns, but as cultural and historical expressions that traverse a non-linear field from fiction to technical media, from net art to politics of software.
Mapping the anomalies of network culture from the angles of security concerns, the biopolitics of computer systems, and the aspirations for artificial life in software, this second edition also pays attention to the emergence of recent issues of cybersecurity and new forms of digital insecurity. A new preface by Sean Cubitt is also provided.
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Paula M. Poindexter

The rapid adoption of mobile devices has created a new type of consumer, one who chooses smartphones and tablets over laptops and desktops, TV and radio, print newspapers, magazines, books, and landline phones. This new mobile consumer has not just forced businesses, institutions, governments, and organizations to innovate with mobile solutions; this new mobile consumer has upended the news media landscape, challenging news organizations and journalists to produce news for consumers who have little resemblance to yesterday’s newspaper readers, TV news viewers, and online news consumers.

Based on two national surveys, News for a Mobile-First Consumer introduces a mobile consumer taxonomy comprised of three types of mobile consumers: mobile-first, mobile specialists, and mobile laggards. The demographics of these mobile consumers as well as their relationship to news and social media are explored in depth. Social media as a competitor to and platform for mobile news are also examined, and special attention is devoted to news apps from the perspective of consumers.

News for a Mobile-First Consumer also provides insight about millennials, racial and ethnic minorities, and women, who are at the forefront of the mobile revolution but less engaged with news. To improve mobile journalism and increase news engagement, «Essentials of Mobile Journalism» are proposed.

As the first book to explore news and consumers in the mobile sphere, this book is required reading for scholars and professionals as well as undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in journalism, communication, strategic communications, advertising, media and society, marketing, and technology courses.

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Sympathy for the Cyberbully

How the Crusade to Censor Hostile and Offensive Online Speech Abuses Freedom of Expression

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Arthur S. Hayes

In the first systematic account of judicial rulings striking down cyberbullying laws in the United States and Canada, Sympathy for the Cyberbully offers an unapologetic defense of online acid-tongued disparagers and youthful and adult sexters. In the first decade of the 21st century, legitimate concerns about the harmful effects of cyberbullying degenerated into a moral panic. The most troubling aspect of the panic has been a spate of censorship—the enactment of laws which breach long-standing constitutional principles, by authorizing police to arrest and juries to convict, and schools to suspend, individuals for engaging in online expression that would be constitutionally protected had it been communicated offline. These hastily drawn statutes victimize harsh critics of elected officials, scholars, school officials and faculty, distributors of constitutionally protected pornography, adolescents "talking smack," and teens who engage in the consensual exchange of nude images, even in states where teens of a certain age enjoy the right to engage in sexual relations. The victims’ stories are told here.

Sympathy for the Cyberbully is suitable for undergraduate, graduate and law school courses in media law, First Amendment law and free expression.

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Crowdfunding, industries culturelles et démarche participative

De nouveaux financements pour la création

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Laurent Creton and Kira Kitsopanidou

La notion de participation, associée aux usages du web 2.0, est devenue une composante essentielle de l’économie numérique. Par-delà les fantasmes cultivés par les discours médiatiques sur l’économie participative et la rhétorique techno-démocratique, cet ouvrage vise à déterminer si la nouveauté des termes « crowdfunding », « finance participative », « économie contributive », « crowdsourcing », « consommation collaborative », etc., rend compte de changements majeurs et d’innovations significatives en matière de pratiques sociales, de modèles organisationnels et de logiques financières et industrielles à l’œuvre au sein des industries de la culture.
Le crowdfunding contribue-t-il au financement et à l’exposition de biens culturels plutôt en marge des logiques industrielles et du circuit commercial traditionnel, ou est-il principalement au service de l’économie de best-sellers participant d’emblée à la réduction de l’incertitude qui caractérise tous les biens d’expérience et permettant la captation très en amont d’une audience potentielle pour les projets les plus fédérateurs ?
L’ouvrage met en perspective les logiques transformatives du crowdfunding et de l’économie participative selon une approche interdisciplinaire (économie, sociologie, sciences de l’information et de la communication, droit, histoire) en se fondant sur l’étude de cas précis et sur les témoignages de professionnels issus de différents secteurs culturels et créatifs.