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Jorge Serrano

African antiquity has been discerned both nullifyingly and constructively. Uses of African Antiquity in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries reveals how reading the past can be extended to understand sensitivities involving origins and how it imparts collective posture. The ancient historical imagery epitomized by writers and artists alike includes the distant past as well as an immediate past. Comparatively, representation of time long gone records transhistorical presence and civilizational participation and agentic validity. African antiquity can be construed as diasporic through time and space and in regards to nomenclature it extends understanding of peopleness, e.g. Libya, Ethiopia, Africa, Afrika, African Egypt, Kemet, Alkebu-lan, Nubia, Ta-Seti, Ta-Nehisi, Ta-Merry, Kush, Axum, Meroë, Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Zulu, and so many more are recognized in a time-spatial continuum linked to African, Colored, Negro, and Black, as various terms inform origins identity. Unfortunately, typologies disciplinarily stem from anthropological construction, yet here African antiquity as sign heralds clines and clusters; splintering Africana from humanitas ultimately contends against subjugation. African antiquity absorbs character and notions of diachronologically dispersed peoples reflect origins indulgence. African antiquity as a stretched concept and/or historicism triply adds understanding, grouping, and alterity. This primarily is a review of thinkers who defend against people erasure in the past with its socially and nihilistic affective ways.

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Krzysztof Filip Rudolf

The book focuses on the phenomenon of archaization in literary translation. It analyzes the concept of archaism, pointing to its strongly evaluative aspect and highlighting the difficulties connected with supplying its clear and acceptable definition. Archaism and archaization are strongly rooted in nostalgia, understood as the human yearning for stability and harmony. Far from being an idle embellishment or an empty postmodernist game, archaization emerges as a vehicle for powerful emotions embedded in dominant discourses fostered by educated European elites. Archaism, like nostalgia, eclectically and arbitrarily recreates the past, in accordance with dominant political and cultural agendas. Both phenomena idealize the past, forcibly purifying it from all unwanted elements.

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Aspects of Medieval English Language and Literature

Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference of the Society of Historical English Language and Linguistics

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Edited by Michiko Ogura and Hans Sauer

This volume is a collection of papers read at the International Medieval Congress at Leeds in 2017, in two sessions organized by the Institute of English Studies at the University of London and four sessions organized by the Society of Historical English Language and Linguistics. Contributions consist of poetry, prose, interlinear glosses, syntax, semantics, lexicology, and medievalism. The contributors employ a wealth of different approaches. The general theme of the IMC 2017 was ‘otherness’, and some papers fit this theme very well. Even when two researchers deal with a similar topic and arrive at different conclusions, the editors do not try to harmonize them but present them as they are for further discussion.

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Border Stories

Narratives of Peace, Conflict and Communication in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Edited by Beate Greisel, Tanja Konrad, Senta Sanders and Heike Schwarz

Narratives of human existence that cross borders on manifold levels and reflect current vulnerability to the environment and humankind are essential preconditions to ensure an open-minded and humanistic society. This collection covers environmental, ethical, political, postcolonial, psychological, and sociological issues of borders and border-crossing. Combining creative writing with academic essays, this book seeks to incorporate the productive results of the eponymous Summer School which was organized for GAPS and held at the University of Augsburg in September 2015.

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Enrique Sánchez-Costa

From 1890 to 1945, Europe was shaken by political, social, and cultural revolutions brought about by the crisis of modernity. Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud stoked the yearnings of a convulsed era, devastated by the First World War. It was a time when all kinds of alternative and radical models of modernity were erected in pursuit of a new world: from the exasperation of communist and fascist totalitarianism to the frenzy of the artistic avant-gardes and biopolitics.

Hungry for transcendence and tormented by hope, this passionate age also gave rise in Europe to a Catholic revival in literature. Writers such as G. K. Chesterton, Evelyn Waugh, and Graham Greene in England; Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, and Georges Bernanos in France; and Ramiro de Maeztu and José Bergamín in Spain found that Catholicism was the key to coping with the enigmas and paradoxes of modern man. At the same time, by injecting the political and artistic principles of modernity into the Christian tradition, they transformed a reactionary Catholicism into the paradigm of ultramodernity.

This book explores the intellectual history of a European cultural phenomenon that has thus far been left out of most works of criticism, despite its magnitude. Moreover, it does so through vibrant prose that makes this work of research read like a novel.

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Christian Ludwig

This the first extensive study of the graphic narratives of Alison Bechdel, one of the most renowned and influential cartoonists and graphic novelists of our time. Over the last few decades, a wealth of publications on the growing medium of graphic fiction has become available. The contribution of this volume to this body of work is to explore Bechdel’s oeuvre from her earlier cartoons to her contemporary full-length graphic memoirs, particularly chronicling her formative years. Employing a number of case studies from Bechdel’s work, this publication shows how Bechdel plays with the medium-specific characteristics of graphic narratives in order to trace back the complex relationship with her parents and the development of her own gender identities.

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El Oeste recuperado

La literatura del pasado y la construcción de personajes en «El Señor de los Anillos»

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Martin Simonson

Tolkien no habría estado de acuerdo con el empleo del término "Occidente" para hablar del espacio legendario y cultural que tenía en mente cuando reconstruyó y re-mitificó el pasado literario en su obra cumbre. El término proviene de la Antigüedad Clásica y no abarca en su origen los territorios del vasto Norte, cuyas tradiciones literarias Tolkien también incorporó en su visión mitificada del Oeste. El Oeste de Tolkien sintetiza leyendas y expresiones literarias del oeste, norte y sur de Europa, y por ello los personajes de El Señor de los Anillos a menudo hunden sus raíces en una multitud de géneros literarios.

El presente estudio recorre la evolución de los personajes principales de la obra de Tolkien y explica, entre otras cosas, cómo el diálogo entre diferentes géneros literarios puede dar cuenta de las aparentes incoherencias en el personaje de Aragorn, los diferentes papeles genéricos que desempeña Gandalf a lo largo de la historia, o cómo unos prosaicos hobbits, surgidos de la Inglaterra rural del siglo XIX, son capaces de relacionarse con los antiguos mundos épicos de Rohan y Gondor.

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Muslim Indian Women Writing in English

Class Privilege, Gender Disadvantage, Minority Status

Elizabeth Jackson

In Muslim Indian Women Writing in English: Class Privilege, Gender Disadvantage, Minority Status, Dr. Elizabeth Jackson conducts a study of the literary fiction of the four best-known Muslim Indian women writing in English during the postcolonial period: Attia Hosain (1913–1998), Zeenuth Futehally (1904–1992), Shama Futehally (no relation, 1952–2004), and Samina Ali (b. 1969). As elite Muslim women in India, the literary vision of these authors is influenced by their paradoxical position of class privilege, gender disadvantage, and minority status. Accordingly, there are recurring thematic concerns central to the fiction of all four writers, each of which forms a chapter in the book: "Religion and Communal Identity," "Marriage and Sexuality," "Gender and Social Class," and "Responding to Patriarchy." The first chapter, "Form and Narrative Strategy," provides an initial framework by examining the literary techniques of each writer.

Much has been written about literature in English by Indian women, about Muslim literature in general, about the Muslim minority in India, and about Muslim women all over the world. However, until now there has been no major academic study of literature in English by Muslim Indian women. Aimed at researchers, students, and general readers, this book aims to fill that gap in the critical scholarship.

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Non-Violent Resistance

Irreverence in Irish Culture

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Edited by Agnès Maillot, Jennifer Bruen and Jean-Philippe Imbert

Humour, by its very nature controversial, plays an important role in social interaction. With its power to question assumptions, it can be used a weapon of subversion, and its meaning and interpretation are embedded within the culture that generates them in complex ways. The scrutiny of Irish culture through the lens of humour is highly revealing, contributing to an alternative, and sometimes irreverent, reading of events. As John Updike wrote of Raymond Queneau’s witty re-imagining of the Easter Rising, humour can effectively expose «casual ambivalence».

This volume investigates the many ways in which writers, playwrights, politicians, historians, filmmakers, artists and activists have used irreverence and humour to look at aspects of Irish culture and explore the contradictions and shortcomings of the society in which they live.

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Processes of Spatialization in the Americas

Configurations and Narratives

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Edited by Gabriele Pisarz-Ramirez and Hannes Warnecke-Berger

Where do the Americas begin, and where do they end? What is the relationship between the spatial constructions of «area» and «continent»? How were the Americas imagined by different actors in different historical periods, and how were these imaginations – as continent, nation, region – guided by changing agendas and priorities? This interdisciplinary volume addresses competing and conflicting configurations and narratives of spatialization in the context of globalization processes from the 19th century to the present.