Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Theology and Philosophy x
  • Upcoming Publications x
Clear All
Restricted access

Quand Jacques et Paul se paraphrasent

Étude d'intertextualité entre 1 Corinthiens, Jacques et Romains

Series:

Jean-Baptiste Stern

Ce livre est une étude comparative, essentiellement lexicologique, de trois épîtres du Nouveau Testament : I Corinthiens, Jacques et Romains. La première partie rouvre le débat autour de Jacques, considéré, surtout depuis la Réforme luthérienne, comme peu conforme, sous certains aspects, à la doctrine paulinienne. L’examen des sources et de l’intertextualité permet sur ce point d’avancer de nouvelles hypothèses. La deuxième partie, qui met en parallèle Jacques et I Corinthiens, montre que le premier texte suppose une connaissance du second. Dans la troisième partie en revanche, où l’on confronte Jacques et Romains, il semblerait que ce soit l’apôtre Paul qui, pour un écrit jugé majeur, ait effectué des emprunts et subi des influences. Cette passionnante dynamique textuelle, fondée sur des interférences et similitudes, se comprend mieux si l’on tient compte des pratiques d’écriture du temps, et en particulier de la technique de la paraphrasis, propre à la rhétorique antique.

Restricted access

Enlivening Faith

Music, Spirituality and Christian Theology

Series:

Edited by June Boyce-Tillman, Stephen Roberts and Jane Erricker

The relationship between Christian theology and music has been complex since the early days

of the Church. In the twentieth century the secularization of Western culture has led to further

complexity. The search for the soul, following Nietzsche’s declaration of the Death of God has

led to an increasing body of literature in many fields on spirituality. This book is an attempt

to open up a conversation between these related discourses, with contributions reflecting a

range of perspectives within them. It is not the final word on the relationship but expresses a

conviction about their relationship. Collecting together such a variety of approaches allows new

understandings to emerge from their juxtaposition and collation. This book will contribute to

the ongoing debate between theology, spirituality, culture and the arts. It includes contexts with

structured relationships between music and the Church alongside situations where spirituality

and music are explored with sometimes distant echoes of Divinity and ancient theologies

reinterpreted for the contemporary world.

Restricted access

Theodore Sabo

Origins of Eastern Christian Mysticism asserts that the thinkers between Basil of Caesarea and Symeon the New Theologian were important mainly for their role in the formation of Hesychasm, a fourteenth-century mystical movement in the Eastern church. The book surveys previous research on Proto-Hesychasm and sets forth eight Hesychastic trends in its practitioners: monasticism, dark and light mysticism, and an emphasis on the heart, theōsis, the humanity of Christ, penthos, and unceasing prayer.

Theodore Sabo integrates detailed and carefully researched accounts of the lives and thought of the foundational figures of Hesychasm into a compelling narrative of the movement’s origins. The Cappadocian fathers established monasticism as the predominant milieu of Proto-Hesychasm and emphasized both theōsis and dark mysticism. Dark mysticism would come into conflict with the light mysticism of their contemporary Pseudo-Macarius, but both currents would be passed on to the Hesychasts. Macarius was a seminal figure within Proto-Hesychasm, responsible for its stress on light mysticism and heart mysticism. Hesychasm itself, the author contends, emerged from two main Proto-Hesychast fonts, the philosophical (represented by such figures as Pseudo-Dionysius and Maximus the Confessor) and the ascetic (the realm of figures like John Climacus and Isaac of Nineveh). The former school transmitted to Hesychasm a virtually unacknowledged Platonism; the latter contributed to Hesychasm’s preoccupation with theōsis, penthos, and unceasing prayer, albeit from a solely monastic perspective. Finally, Symeon the New Theologian emerged as the redoubtable successor to these schools, unifying their distinct traditions in his philosophical approach.

While previous scholarship has documented the connections between Proto-Hesychasm and Hesychasm, Origins of Eastern Christian Mysticism is unique in its treatment of the Proto-Hesychasts as a distinguishable group, and as direct instigators of Hesychasm. This provocative study should be of interest to students and scholars of the late antique history of the Eastern Orthodox Church, as well as to contemporary theologians steeped in the Eastern mystical tradition.

Restricted access

Series:

Seung-In Song

The central aim of Water as an Image of the Spirit in the Johannine Literature is to propose two sets of indicators that can be used to assess the symbolic reference of water imagery in the Johannine literature. The first set, comprised of five indicators, can be used to decide whether a given instance of water imagery in the Johannine literature represents the Spirit. The other set, comprised of six indicators, can be used to determine whether a given instance of water imagery has a symbolic meaning instead of or in addition to its literal meaning. The validity of these indicators is demonstrated by applying them to six disputed water passages (1 John 5:6–8; Rev. 22:1–2; John 3:5, 4:10–14, 6:35, and 19:34). The author draws on narrative and exegetical methodologies to stage new claims that will incite further debate and discussion regarding the role of water imagery—and symbolic devices more broadly—in the Johannine texts.