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Edited by David Manning

This new book series will show that a critical understanding of religious pluralism in the past is of vital significance to debates about identity, diversity, and co-existence in the present. Studies will focus on using a historical perspective to address one of three key themes in the period between 1500 and 2000 CE: intra-religious pluralism; inter-religious pluralism; or, religion, secularism, and the nation state. Within this frame of reference, constructive contrasts between a wide range of foci, approaches, and viewpoints will be keenly encouraged. The series will champion established lines of research in political, social, cultural, and gendered histories of religious pluralism – e.g. studies on liberty, persecution, and toleration – whilst also encouraging novel ways of transcending a scholarly discourse which is dominated by ideologies and methodologies derived from the social sciences – e.g. by studies on the theological and literary dimensions of conflict, cohesion, and community. The series will embrace scholarship on subjects from any part of the world. European and extra-European perspectives that complement traditional Anglo-American thinking are particularly welcome.

As the ‘global turn’ continues to energize new types of enquiry, the series will also seek to advance studies of indigenous and displaced religious groups. With this scope there is a reflexive acknowledgement that the rationale for and defining concepts of the series are grounded in a ‘western’ intellectual tradition; however, this should serve as a challenge to prospective authors to pioneer new dialogues between ‘western’ and ‘non-western’ approaches and foci, or even surpass the dichotomy altogether. An emphasis will be given to promoting the best research of early career scholars from around the world, whilst also giving more established academics the opportunity to develop their multimedia policy-orientated work – e.g. podcasts, blogs, talks, press briefings, reports for thinktanks, governments, and public agencies etc. – into a book that would engage peers and students alike.

In association with Cambridge Institute on Religion and International Studies

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Edited by Mark Mietzner

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Edited by Gisela Heffes and Lisa Blackmore

Latin American Environmental Humanities is a peer-reviewed book series that will focus on rigorous works by the most innovative scholars working on Latin America. It will publish scholarly contributions to the growing field of environmental humanities with the aim of establishing critical conversations about nature and culture within the framework of the latest environmental debates and their historical antecedents and contexts. The series will include a wide range of disciplines, such as literary studies, history, film, visual arts, and philosophy, that probe key issues in the global discussions of ecocriticism, environmental history, posthumanism, waste studies, indigenous ecologies and epistemologies, animal studies, landscape studies, natural disaster studies, and blue humanities. We are particularly interested in theoretically and inter- and trans-disciplinary works.
Ultimately, the goal of Latin American Environmental Humanities is to bring together new perspectives and advance scholarship with manuscripts that will focus on specifically cutting-edge Latin American issues that lie at the intersections of aesthetics, cultural, visual and literary studies, history, philosophy and environmental studies.
We invite submissions of both monographs and edited collections that will contribute to the growing discussions in Latin American cultural studies as well as innovate by bringing new perspectives on underrepresented sources, or sources that could be revisited under a new ecological light. By "Latin America'', we include both Brazil and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. Written in English, the titles in this series will include both single- and multi-authored works. The series will consider high quality translations into English, but will not provide translation funding.

We welcome proposals for manuscripts. Those interested in contributing to the series should send a detailed project outline to the series editors, Gisela Heffes (gisela.heffes@rice.edu) and Lisa Blackmore (Lisa.blackmore@essex.ac.uk).

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Edited by Misia Sophia Doms and Jesko Reiling

These "Studies" explore the periodical in its many forms, dating back to the beginning of printing. In addition to magazines and newspapers, we investigate broadsheets, folk calendars, almanacs, and other forms of the periodical. In this international and interdisciplinary series, local, regional, national and trans-European communication spaces and forms are also examined. The series considers historical developments (of a specific genre or an ensemble of several periodicals, etc.) and offers synchronous investigations into the media and communications of a given period.

The "Studies" aim to contribute to the understanding of the emergence, establishment and diversification of the European print media reception and literary and media formats and techniques.

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The City as Place

Emotions, Experiences, and Meanings

Edited by Rebecca Madgin and Nicolas Kenny

The purpose of this series is to examine the city as a lived place. Specifically, we are interested in the ways in which the city is invested with meaning through everyday lived experiences. The series is particularly interested in submissions that focus on the perceptual and felt dimensions of urban places through exploring the experiential, emotional, sensory, and affective dimensions that contribute to how people behave in, feel about, and move around in cities. Books in this series will interrogate the relationship between people and place through a focus on the diverse ways in which subjective and intimate feelings are fundamental constituents of the urban experience. We encourage authors to examine the city as a lived place from a range of different perspectives, and to be inclusive of individual and collective voices in the city to better understand the historical development and contemporary evolution of diverse urban settings.

Some of the questions we seek to explore through the series include, but are not restricted to:

  • How is the city experienced, by whom, and how does this change over time?
  • Who shapes the experience of the city and for what reasons?
  • How do individual and shared joy, fear, pride, nostalgia, disgust, or other emotions, shape the meanings attributed to urban spaces?
  • How does the lived experience of, and emotional connections to, urban places inform the way particular spaces within cities are preserved and memorialized, or alternatively demolished and redeveloped?
  • In what ways is our understanding of the lived experience of the city sharpened through the lens of comparative, transnational, and global approaches?

The series seeks to examine the real and the imaginary, the representational and the non-representational, the historical and the contemporary, the remembered and the recreated in all historical periods including research on the twenty-first century city. The series is open to work covering all geographic areas, and we encourage authors, where possible and relevant, to situate their studies in comparative, transnational, or global perspectives. Books may be published in English or in French.

Series editors: Dr Rebecca Madgin, Urban Studies, University of Glasgow and Dr Nicolas Kenny, History, Simon Fraser University.