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Edited by Alison Wilde

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Editorial Board: Eleoma Bodammer (Edinburgh), Catalin Brylla (Bournemouth), Colin Cameron (Northumbria), Sally Chivers (Trent, Canada), Eduard Cuelenaere (Ghent), Beth Haller (Towson, USA), Catherine Long, Nicole Marcotić (Windsor), Maria Tsakiri (Cyprus), Dolly Sen, Sonali Shah (Birmingham), Alison Sheldon (Leeds), Murray Simpson (Dundee), Angela M. Smith (Utah), Heike Steinhoff (Ruhr-University Bochum), Laura Waite (Liverpool Hope).

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Alison Wilde

Forthcoming
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Symphonie der Worte

Musikalisierung von Fiktion in ausgewählten Werken Irène Némirovskys

Eva Franziska Pemmerl

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Experience in the Early Thought of George Tyrrell

Human, Religious, Christian, Catholic

Lawrence J. Donohoo

This study undertakes a comprehensive inquiry into the concept of experience in the thought of George Tyrrell from his earliest writings to 1900. No aspect of experience is passed over in its human, religious, Christian, and Catholic inflections. Tyrrell pursued a vast array of subjects and addressed them in often novel ways, even in his formative years, and at every stage of his thought he encountered the question of experience wherever he roamed. A study of experience in Tyrrell’s early works thus effectively offers a sweeping survey of the full gamut of his early thought. In the beginning we see that he came to recognize only gradually the significance of this category for all his inquiries. While scholars have traced experience in Tyrrell’s mature thought and researched its role in such targeted fields as ecclesiology and fundamental theology, the early writings by contrast have been largely passed over. This suggests a need for an unrestricted search at the origin of Tyrrell’s thought that tracks his discovery, formation, and evolution of this concept. We discover that its flexible and enigmatic character shapes and unifies the various questions that Tyrrell addressed over the years, thus marking his mature theology with a distinct character that was passed on to others in the universe of experience.

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Navigating the Toggled Term

A Guide for K-12 Classroom and School Leaders

Series:

Matthew Rhoads

Online learning, blended learning, socially distanced classrooms, educational technology, safety protocols, instructional models, organizational logistics, and educator burnout are all realities presented by the toggled term. Navigating the Toggled Term: A Guide for K-12 Classroom and School Leaders sets the stage not only for the present but also well into the future to help K-12 classroom and school leaders navigate online learning, blended learning, integrating educational technology tools with effective research-based instructional strategies, and moving between various educational settings at the instructional and organizational level. This book provides experienced and novice classroom teachers and school leaders with best practice instructional and organizational frameworks integrated with mainstream educational technology tools to navigate the challenges of teaching students of all ages in an ever-changing world. Beyond the major instructional and organizational frameworks, this book touches on differentiating instruction for all learners, communicating to students and families within digital environments, and provides strategies for educator self-care. Last, this book includes teacher and school leader voice in the form of twelve narrative case studies of practicing educators that align with each chapter’s theme to show the strategies and frameworks in motion for readers.
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Mentoring and Communication

Theories and Practices

Edited by Diana Trebing and Ahmet Atay

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Edited by David J. Connor and Beth A. Ferri

This book purposefully connects practice to research, and vice versa, through the use of deeply personal stories in the form of autoethnographic memoirs. In this collection, twenty contributors share selected tales of teaching students with dis/abilities in K-12 settings across the USA, including tentative triumphs, frustrating failures, and a deep desire to understand the dynamics of teaching and learning. The authors also share an early awareness of significant dissonance between academic knowledge taught to them in teacher education programs and their own experiential knowledge in schools. Coming to question established practices within the field of special education in relation to the children they taught, each author grew increasingly critical of deficit-models of disability that emphasized commonplace practices of physical and social exclusion, dysfunction and disorders, repetitive remediation and punitive punishments. The authors describe how their interactions with children and youth, parents, and administrators, in the context of their classrooms and schools, influenced a shift away from the limiting discourse of special education and toward become critical special educators and/or engage with disability studies as a way to reclaim, reframe, and reimagine disability as a natural part of human diversity. Furthermore, the authors document how these early experiences in the everydayness of schooling helped ground them as teachers and later, teacher educators, who galvanized their research trajectories around studying issues of access and equality throughout educational structures and systems, while developing new theoretical models within Disability Studies in Education, aimed to impact practices and policies.
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Edited by Maria B. Hopkins and Rachel Bailey Jones

Centers for teaching and learning all face the same dilemma: In a context where faculty are not required to partake in our services, how do we provide transformative learning experiences to which faculty willingly give their limited time? The answer, Maria B. Hopkins and Rachel Bailey Jones propose, is to move away from a workshop model of faculty development and toward a model that supports the kinds of connections among faculty that lead to self-sustaining growth and development. This edited book provides a breadth of innovative alternatives to fixed-schedule faculty development workshops that faculty are rarely attending due to the increasing complexity of their professional lives. The audience for this book is higher education administrators, faculty, and staff responsible for faculty development related to teaching and learning. Each chapter provides a detailed description of a faculty development initiative in practice at our respective institutions that provide opportunities for creativity, adaptability, and collaboration among faculty. Public, private, and community colleges, small and large, research-focused and teaching-focused institutions are represented. The editors have taken on this project because this is the resource they wish they had when they began their work as directors of the teaching lab at their institution.
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Helena Dettmer

In his 1995 Teubner edition, J. B. Hall separates Tristia 1.5, 1.9, 3.4, 4.4, 5.2, and 5.7 into two poems. One reviewer of Hall’s edition is highly critical of the editor for not justifying the separation of these poems despite the fact the divisions have manuscript support. Because of the sorry state of the textual transmission of Ovid's five books of Tristia, it is sometimes difficult to determine the beginning and end of an individual poem if that poem resumes thematically and verbally where the previous poem concludes. The aim of this study is to show that definitive evidence can be offered to justify division of these six elegies into two poems. Structure combined with theme serves as an analytical tool that defines the beginning and end of the twelve literary pieces under consideration and highlights their artistry. Resolution of the issue of unity enhances our interpretation of the independent poems and our understanding of the complex interplay among poems within each poetry-book. The careful and often brilliant craftsmanship of the poems and of the books in which they appear reaffirms that Ovid’s repeated deprecation of the quality of his literary work composed during his period of exile in the Black Sea region is simply a pose to attract sympathy and support from his Roman audience.
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The Language of Feminine Duty

Articulating Gender, Culture, and Covert Policy in Modern Japan

Rika Saito

This book examines "women’s speech" as a policy of constructs expressed in official and unofficial discourse from the 1880s to the 1920s in Japan. It analyzes specific language policies that were incorporated through governmental gender policy to perpetuate "women’s speech," asymmetrical gendered speech styles and concepts in the Japanese language. It also seeks to develop cross-cultural approaches to language and gender theories initiated in the United States and Europe by proposing new concepts of language policy. This work contributes to ongoing interdisciplinary scholarship on gender, language, and policy by reconsidering the relationship between the Japanese "national language" and "women’s speech."