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Dafydd Sills-Jones, Jouko Aaltonen and Pietari Kaapa

Forthcoming
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Giving with an Agenda

How New Philanthropy Advocates for the Corporate Reform of Education

Marina Avelar

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Ian Cawood

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Simon Bennett

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Edited by Gregory Castle, Alex Davis and Lee Jenkins

The Global Literary Modernisms series provides a platform for literary scholarship on modernism across genres and geographies. The concept of the global today carries with it new ideas about time and historical development, as well as new theories about national literary traditions and new models of social belonging that extend beyond national borders. Without sacrificing our interest in national traditions, we invite studies that link those traditions to more extensive global and transnational contexts. The series also invites studies that reconsider the temporalities and formal and aesthetic praxes of modernism—not only its historical development, but the peculiar rhythms and pacing of its narratives, its dramatic literatures, its poetry, its song. While respecting the contemporary elasticity of the term, this series understands modernism not simply as a synonym for the ‘modern’ but as a movement that responds to the modern wherever it finds it.

We invite English-language submissions on all aspects of literary modernism. Proposals are invited for monographs and edited volumes that engage transnational and postcolonial, canonical and marginal modernisms, and the legacies of modernism. We welcome single- and multiple-author studies from a variety of approaches and frameworks, literary-historical and/or theoretical.

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Pixie

Recherche de sens

Edited by Nicole Decostre

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Rethinking Black German Studies

Approaches, Interventions and Histories

Edited by Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

Black German Studies is an interdisciplinary field that has experienced significant growth over the past three decades, integrating subjects such as gender studies, diaspora studies, history, and media and performance studies. The field’s contextual roots as well as historical backdrop, nevertheless, span centuries. This volume assesses where the field is now by exploring the nuances of how the past – colonial, Weimar, National Socialist, post-1945, and post-Wende – informs the present and future of Black German Studies; how present generations of Black Germans look to those of the past for direction and empowerment; how discourses shift due to the diversification of power structures and the questioning of identity-based categories; and how Black Germans affirm their agency and cultural identity through cultural productions that engender both counter-discourses and counter-narratives.

Examining Black German Studies as a critical, hermeneutic field of inquiry, the contributions are organized around three thematically conceptualized sections: German and Austrian literature and history; pedagogy and theory; and art and performance. Presenting critical works in the fields of performance studies, communication and rhetoric, and musicology, the volume complicates traditional historical narratives, interrogates interdisciplinary methods, and introduces theoretical approaches that help to advance the field.

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Troubling Method

Narrative Research as Being

Petra Munro Hendry, Roland Mitchell and Paul Eaton

Troubling Method: Narrative Research as Being seeks to extract narrative inquiry from method. The shift to a post-humanist, post-qualitative moment is not just another stage in modernism that seeks to "improve" knowledge production, but is a shift to understanding research as an ontology, a way of being in the world, rather than a mode of production. Fundamental assumptions of research: method, data, analysis, and findings are deconstructed and reconfigured as a mode of relational intra-action.

Troubling Method is constructed as a dialogue between the three authors, focusing on their work as qualitative, narrative researchers. The authors revisit six previously published works in which they grapple with the contradictions and ironies of engaging in pragmatist, critical, feminist qualitative research. After a lengthy introduction which problematizes "method", the book is divided into three sections, each with two chapters that are bracketed by an introduction to the issues discussed in the chapters and then a "dialogue interlude" in which the authors deliberate what makes possible the questions they are raising about method and narrative research. The three sections attend to the central premises of "narrative research as being": 1) relationships 2) listening and 3) unknowing.

Troubling Method is ideal for introductory or advanced courses in qualitative research, narrative inquiry, educational research, and those aimed at employing critical theories in qualitative and narrative inquiry.

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Edited by Dorothy Price, Madhu Krishnan and Rhian Atkin

Transnational Cultures promotes enquiry into the cultural products of transnationalism with a particular focus on the visual arts, literature, music, performance, cinema and new media. With the growth of diasporic communities, migratory crossings and virtual exchange, cultural production beyond, across and traversing borders has become an increasing focus of scholarship within historical, contemporary and comparative contexts. Concepts of nationhood are increasingly understood as a limiting and limited way of understanding culture, as artists, writers, filmmakers and intellectuals produce multilingual or translingual texts, collaborate and communicate across national borders, and redefine and reject the national in favour of the global and/or the postnational.

This series encourages new work that investigates how a transnational lens might transform existing understandings of art and culture produced in any period or location. What broader flows of knowledge, capital and power mark the cultural crossings that appear and reappear in pre-modern, modern and contemporary social formations? How do the cultural products of transnationalism trouble existing narratives of the nation-state? How do transnational cultures interact with and become absorbed by local, indigenous and national narratives? Topics may include the production and consumption of culture across borders; mutual exchange of ideas, objects and practices as a result of exile, migration and displacement; the role of social media, blogging, reality television and digital gaming in transnational dialogue. The series strives to offer a renewed understanding of the networks of cultural exchange, transmission and translation that have helped to produce and disseminate aesthetic ideas across different continents and centuries.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections are welcome. All proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed. The main language of publication is English.


Editorial Advisory Board: Shakuntala Banaji (London School of Economics), Helena Buescu (Lisboa), Deborah Cherry (TrAIN, London), Harry Garuba (Cape Town), Richard Hibbitt (Leeds), Maria Koundoura (Emerson), Vijay Kumar Tadakamalla (Osmania, India), Bénédicte Ledent (Liège), Su Lin Lewis (Bristol), Oiyan Liu (Hong Kong), Churnjeet Mahn (Surrey), Jacqueline Maingard (Bristol), Ulrika Maude (Bristol), Stephen Morton (Southampton), Christopher Ouma (Cape Town), James Procter (Newcastle), Mark Sabine (Nottingham), Lisa Shaw (Liverpool), Siobhán Shilton (Bristol), Catherine Speck (Adelaide), Toshio Watanabe (TrAIN, London), Adam Watt (Exeter)