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David Manning

Forthcoming.
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Edited by David Manning

This new book series will show that a critical understanding of religious pluralism in the past is of vital significance to debates about identity, diversity, and co-existence in the present. Studies will focus on using a historical perspective to address one of three key themes in the period between 1500 and 2000 CE: intra-religious pluralism; inter-religious pluralism; or, religion, secularism, and the nation state. Within this frame of reference, constructive contrasts between a wide range of foci, approaches, and viewpoints will be keenly encouraged. The series will champion established lines of research in political, social, cultural, and gendered histories of religious pluralism – e.g. studies on liberty, persecution, and toleration – whilst also encouraging novel ways of transcending a scholarly discourse which is dominated by ideologies and methodologies derived from the social sciences – e.g. by studies on the theological and literary dimensions of conflict, cohesion, and community. The series will embrace scholarship on subjects from any part of the world. European and extra-European perspectives that complement traditional Anglo-American thinking are particularly welcome.

As the ‘global turn’ continues to energize new types of enquiry, the series will also seek to advance studies of indigenous and displaced religious groups. With this scope there is a reflexive acknowledgement that the rationale for and defining concepts of the series are grounded in a ‘western’ intellectual tradition; however, this should serve as a challenge to prospective authors to pioneer new dialogues between ‘western’ and ‘non-western’ approaches and foci, or even surpass the dichotomy altogether. An emphasis will be given to promoting the best research of early career scholars from around the world, whilst also giving more established academics the opportunity to develop their multimedia policy-orientated work – e.g. podcasts, blogs, talks, press briefings, reports for thinktanks, governments, and public agencies etc. – into a book that would engage peers and students alike.

In association with Cambridge Institute on Religion and International Studies

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Enseignements à distance

Des arts savants, le génie d’un métier, l’instruction en valeurs : anthropologies d’une organisation éducative

Olivier Marty

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Edited by Gisela Heffes and Lisa Blackmore

Latin American Environmental Humanities is a peer-reviewed book series that will focus on rigorous works by the most innovative scholars working on Latin America. It will publish scholarly contributions to the growing field of environmental humanities with the aim of establishing critical conversations about nature and culture within the framework of the latest environmental debates and their historical antecedents and contexts. The series will include a wide range of disciplines, such as literary studies, history, film, visual arts, and philosophy, that probe key issues in the global discussions of ecocriticism, environmental history, posthumanism, waste studies, indigenous ecologies and epistemologies, animal studies, landscape studies, natural disaster studies, and blue humanities. We are particularly interested in theoretically and inter- and trans-disciplinary works.
Ultimately, the goal of Latin American Environmental Humanities is to bring together new perspectives and advance scholarship with manuscripts that will focus on specifically cutting-edge Latin American issues that lie at the intersections of aesthetics, cultural, visual and literary studies, history, philosophy and environmental studies.
We invite submissions of both monographs and edited collections that will contribute to the growing discussions in Latin American cultural studies as well as innovate by bringing new perspectives on underrepresented sources, or sources that could be revisited under a new ecological light. By "Latin America'', we include both Brazil and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. Written in English, the titles in this series will include both single- and multi-authored works. The series will consider high quality translations into English, but will not provide translation funding.

We welcome proposals for manuscripts. Those interested in contributing to the series should send a detailed project outline to the series editors, Gisela Heffes (gisela.heffes@rice.edu) and Lisa Blackmore (Lisa.blackmore@essex.ac.uk).

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Gisela Heffes and Lisa Blackmore

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Aline Duvoisin

L’ampleur et l’exceptionnalité qui ont caractérisé le baby-boom ont concouru à en construire une représentation dénuée de nuances. L'ouvrage interroge alors l'hétérogénéité qui a caractérisé ce phénomène dans le contexte suisse. Dans une perspective de parcours de vie et en recourant à des méthodes mixtes, l'interrelation des trajectoires familiales et professionnelles des cohortes féminines est examinée au regard du système de valeurs promulgué dans la société suisse de l'époque pour montrer comment un phénomène d’ampleur a pu être le produit d’une diversité de parcours de vie. Si l'ouvrage se concentre sur la Suisse, le développement de l’approche méthodologique mixte qu'il propose offre un cadre d’analyse renouvelé, dont les apports pour la compréhension du baby-boom peuvent être transférer à divers contextes nationaux et à l'étude d'autres phénomènes démographiques.

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Leith Morton

This book analyzes the literature that emerged from World War II. It also examines the literature that resulted from the two major earthquakes that have struck Japan over the course of over the last hundred years. The small number of volumes previously published examining the literature of war and earthquakes in Japan have almost always focused exclusively on fiction while this volume focuses mainly on poetry. This volume breaks new ground in its attempt to draw together and analyze the literature produced by these tragedies as a single phenomenon. It provides a new template for the literature of trauma produced by such events as the earthquake that accompanied the tsunami and nuclear meltdown in northeast Japan in 2011.

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Bodies That Work

African American Women’s Corporeal Activism in Progressive America

Tami Miyatsu

Bodies That Work describes the redefinition of the invisible, fragmented, and commodified African American female body. In Progressive America, black women began to use their bodies in new ways and ventured into professions in which they had typically not been represented. They were bodies that worked—that labored, functioned, and achieved in collective empowerment and that overcame racial, ethnic, and class divides and grappled with the ideas and values of political, financial, and intellectual leadership, thereby dispelling the ingrained stereotypes of womanhood associated with slavery. Based on archival materials and historical documents, Bodies That Work examines four women who reinterpreted and reorganized the historically divided black female body and positioned it within the body politic: Sarah Breedlove Walker, or Madam C.J. Walker (1867–1919), an entrepreneur; Emma Azalia Hackley (1867–1922), an opera singer; Meta Warrick Fuller (1877–1968), a sculptor; and Josephine Baker (1906–1975), an international performer. Each reshaped a different part of the female body: the hair (Walker), the womb and hands (Fuller), the vocal cords (Hackley), and the torso (Baker), all of which had been denigrated during slavery and which continued to be devalued by white patriarchy in their time. Alleviating racial and gender prejudices through their work, these women provided alternative images of black womanhood. The book’s focus on individual body parts inspires new insights within race and gender studies by visualizing the processes by which women lost/gained autonomy, aspiration, and leadership and demonstrating how the black female body was made (in)visible in the body politic.

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Carlos Blanco

The Integration of Knowledge explores a theory of human knowledge through a model of rationality combined with some fundamental logical, mathematical, physical and neuroscientific considerations. Its ultimate goal is to present a philosophical system of integrated knowledge, in which the different domains of human understanding are unified by common conceptual structures, such that traditional metaphysical and epistemological questions may be addressed in light of these categories. Philosophy thus becomes a "synthesizer" of human knowledge, through the imaginative construction of categories and questions that may reproduce and even expand the conceptual chain followed by nature and thought, in an effort to organize the results of the different branches of knowledge by inserting them in a broader framework.

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What's Race Got To Do With It?

How Current School Reform Policy Maintains Racial and Economic Inequality. Second Edition

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Edited by Edwin Mayorga, Ujju Aggarwal and Bree Picower

At the time that the first edition of What’s Race Got to Do with It was published (2015), many on the left were struggling to both fight back neoliberal education reforms—such as charter schools, school closings, high-stakes testing—understand how these reforms were defined, and how they circulated through the entanglements of race and class. In the years since, we have seen the accelerated growth of social movements push back against this logic. The steady and grounded work of those fighting back neoliberal education reform has increased the visibility and critique of privatization, market-based reforms, and segregation; demonstrating the interlocking connections between racism and capitalism. We have also seen the election of Donald Trump to the office of U.S. President and the appointment of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education, signaling an intensified attack on public education (alongside other public infrastructures) and a return to "racism as we knew it." As neoliberal multicultural reforms that defined the Obama administration are rolled back, this new edition of What’s Race considers how we might sharpen our analysis concerning what we are working to defend and what we are working to transform. Each chapter author tracks the changes and continuities of recent years, revealing the ways in which market-driven education reforms work with and through race, and sharing grassroots stories of resistance to these reforms. We hope that this book will continue to provide readers with a guide to action that emboldens our struggles for justice.