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Breast Cancer Inside Out

Bodies, Biographies, & Beliefs

Edited by Kimberly R. Myers

Forthcoming
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Edited by Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Forthcoming
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Edited by Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

Forthcoming
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Dafydd Sills-Jones, Jouko Aaltonen and Pietari Kaapa

Forthcoming
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Fake News

Real Issues in Modern Communication

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Edited by Russell Chun and Susan J. Drucker

In this dizzying post-truth, post-fact, fake news era, the onslaught and speed of potentially untrue, incorrect or fabricated information (some crafted and weaponized, some carelessly shared), can cause a loss of our intellectual bearings. If we fail to have a common truthful basis for discussions of opinion and policy, the integrity of our democracy is at risk.

This up-to-date anthology is designed to provide a survey of technological, ethical, and legal issues raised by falsehoods, particularly social media misinformation. The volume explores visual and data dissemination, business practices, international perspectives and case studies. With misinformation and misleading information being propagated using a variety of media such as memes, data, charts, photos, tweets, posts, and articles, an understanding of the theory, mechanisms, and changing communication landscape is essential to move in the right direction with academic, industry, and government initiatives to inoculate ourselves from the dangers of fake news. The book takes an international and multidisciplinary approach with contributions from media studies, journalism, computer science, the law, and communication, making it distinct among books on fake news.

This book is essential for graduate or undergraduate students in courses dealing with fake news and communication studies. Relevant courses include media studies, journalism, public relations, media ethics, media law, social media, First Amendment law, philosophy, and political science.

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David Manning

Forthcoming.
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Edited by Jerome Teelucksingh and Shane Pantin

This book thematically analyses and surveys areas of Caribbean history and society. The work is divided into three parts: part one addresses migration and identity; part two explores policy and development; and part three explores music and literature. The volume places a fresh perspective on these topics. The essays depart from the usual broader themes of politics, economics and society and provide a deeper insight into forces that left a decisive legacy on aspects of the Caribbean region. Such contributions come at a time when some of the Caribbean territories are marking over 50 years as independent nation states and attempting to create, understand and forge ways of dealing with critical national and regional issues. The volume brings together a broad group of scholars writing on Caribbean issues including postgraduate students, lecturers, and researchers. Each chapter is thematically divided into the aforementioned areas. This book addresses areas much deeper than the linear historical and social science models, and it offers Caribbean academics and researchers a foundation for further research.

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Edited by Sakir Cinkir

EJER Congress is one of the most innovative and interdisciplinary conferences in the field of education. It brings together a wide range of researchers in the field of education from all over the world. The chapters in this book cover varied topics concerning the new educational paradigms, research methods, new directions, and policies including teacher training, professional development, drama, creativity, special education needs, educational management and leadership, academic achievement, pedagogy, teaching language, and quality of life in the field of educational research as well as other related interdisciplinary areas.

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Leroy Ghislain

Cet ouvrage vise à cerner les spécificités contemporaines de l’école maternelle, en mettant au jour les attentes particulières qui y règnent vis-à-vis des enfants. L’auteur réactive ainsi le questionnement des premiers sociologues de l’école maternelle (Dannepond, Plaisance, Chamboredon et Prévot), pour l’appliquer à la période contemporaine. Après la recherche de productivité (années 50), puis d’expressivité (années 60-70), qu’est-ce que l’école maternelle cherche aujourd’hui à faire de l’enfant ?

Mobilisant entretiens, observations, étude des programmes et des rapports d’inspection, l’auteur montre que, dans les dernières décennies, on attend de plus en plus que l’enfant soit un élève autonome et performant. Ceci s’explique notamment par l’évolution des politiques publiques et leur recherche nouvelle de rentabilité, qui ont transformé les objectifs et pratiques ordinaires de l’école maternelle. Du côté de l’enfant, ces attentes d’autonomie et de performance se déclinent en exigences disciplinaires, cognitives, émotionnelles et même hygiéniques qui s’avèrent en partie spécifiques à la période contemporaine. Elles semblent paradoxalement aboutir à renforcer les inégalités sociales, car les enfants issus des catégories moyennes et supérieures y apparaissent bien plus préparés. Ceci ressort notamment de l’étude des pratiques d’inspiration montessorienne, qui se sont diffusées très récemment.

L’école maternelle contemporaine viserait-elle à initier l’enfant à un certain ethos contemporain, performer, qui hante notre imaginaire social ?

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Paulina Łęska

The study presented in this book aimed to test the argument structure of ditransitive verbs in Polish with the use of quantifier scope interpretation. Since these verbs typically allow for relatively free object order, it is not clear whether any of the object orders is basic or if they constitute separate underlying structures. The study reports the results of five experiments testing acceptability of scope interpretation of Polish quantified objects in two object orders, using variables such as coordination, to reveal which scope changing mechanism is responsible for ambiguity. The results showed that only the DO-IO order allowed for scope ambiguity, however, to a different degree depending on the semantic class of the verb. This indicates that the merge position of objects is contingent upon that factor.