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Studies in European Archaeology

by Joshua White (Author)
Edited Collection XX, 240 Pages

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Summary

This series will primarily focus on the publication of excavations which have occurred in Britain over the last twenty years, particularly those that have been developer-funded which are of equal weight and significance as research excavations.
This series is a broad-church archaeological series, primarily focussing on excavation reports of regionally or nationally significant sites (sometimes compiled with other sites sharing a common thread), but also a home for edited collections of academic papers, and individual academic thesis. It would not be limited to particular periods, as this is not a reality with many archaeological contexts (even of an academic nature), with many excavations revealing significant phases of prehistoric, Roman and post-medieval archaeology (for example) on the same site.
Often the publication of ‘commercial’ excavations is often inhibited for one reason or another, but this has primarily arisen through a lack of contact between commercial archaeologist and academic publishers. However, it is also worth noting that currently local journals such as Norfolk Archaeology and regional publishers like East Anglian Archaeology are inundated and not accepting new papers/sites as they are already stretched to their limits. Journals such as Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society are now rejecting papers en mass, as they are increasingly becoming exclusively interested in ‘unique’ sites (which are few and far between, and often not the most productive for the development of archaeological knowledge).
This series is unique, attractive in its flexibility and diversity, but also appealing in its mission and focus to bring to light nationally and internationally important excavations.

Details

Pages
XX, 240
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781789977257
Language
English
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Wien, 2020

Biographical notes

Joshua White (Author)

The series builds on the success of "Studies in the British Mesolithic and Neolithic" by offering an outlet for British archaeological studies, but primarily focussing on the publication of nationally important developer-funded excavations, while not excluding other more academic approaches. Such a series does not currently exist "out there", and it is hoped that eventually such a series would have significance attached to it in its bridging of the academic and commercial worlds.

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Title: Studies in European Archaeology