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shortage or a flood (Fielding & Moss, 2012; Peek & Stough, 2010). In the face of such predictions; research has recognised that public education is fun- damental to the development of human, social and economic capital in an in- creasingly globalised world (Kamens & McNeely, 2010). Social and educational writers similarly suggest that education holds potential for resurrecting demo- cratic notions of citizenship, social justice, equality and humanisation (Freire, 1976, 2004; Freire & Araújo Freire, 1994; Hill, 2012; McLaren, 2015). In recognition of the Dr

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able to use this capital to as a way to perform motherhood in particular ways. An African American or Latino mother/student teacher would likely have different experiences and would bring different cultural capital and language practices to this same classroom (Cho, 2018; Collins, 2016). Scaling practices may be tactical as people import or laminate one space- time onto another, recontextualizing discourses and ideologies into different timescales and spaces to construct new or alternative identities (Collins & Blot, 2003; Collins, Slembrouck, & Baynham, 2009

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-conceptions of the world and our communities. In our daily medi- ated experiences, we usually do not learn the historical circumstances of the lives of underrepresented people, such as African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, or the poor, so, it is difficult to gauge the context of their actions. Media also provide many of the epistemological and rhetorical instruments for us to think about ourselves and others and to ponder the impact of world problems on our communities. Social justice education from the point of view of communication thus focuses on

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investigate, the African American and Latino students on the team brought up conceptions of race in the school. They talked at length about the ways in which students’ perceptions impacted peer relationships and overall campus climate. Several students shared personal experiences of being the target of peers’ racial jabs. Their self-esteem and sense of safety were jarred by the hurtful comments. The team was curious if their individual experiences were representative of a larger problem among students on campus. They wanted to survey all students in the high school

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education. It was used as an integral part of UNESCO’s Education for All strategy, which took on board the different forms of education, including those of a nonformal type emerging from Latin America and Africa. UNESCO had a decidedly “Third World” orientation at the time. The UNESCO concept of lifelong education was promoted by a variegated group of writers (ranging from Liberal to Marxist) and “had a left-wing, humanistic, democratic core, and concerned itself with individual growth and social development” (Wain, 2004b, p. 86). Wain (1987) referred to two waves

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emancipatory’ for two reasons: political economy and subjectivity. While the former is related to the fact that “the total assets of the top six knowledge corporations were 1132,41 billion US dollars in 2007 and are larger than the total African GDP” (Fuchs, 2008a, p. 284), the second has to do with how labor is subsumed within cyberspace thanks to the discourse around collaboration, fun and participation. In other words, what the participation of immaterial labor within cyberspace means has not been endorsed by critical theorists, who have underlined this potential but at

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respectable widows who were too old to work . The rest either concentrated into squalid housing districts surrounding the factories or moved overseas (voluntarily or as convicts) . Migration was involved in both cases, whether within a single country or across oceans . The process of dispossession from the land, flight to the cities, and migration began long before the term globalization was coined, and it continues to this day across Asia, Africa, and Latin America, creating a Planet of Slums (Davis, 2006) . This is the process whereby social class and economic

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surviving but also healthy flourishing organisms. FA: For sure. After my presentation at the Spirit of Humanity Forum I had lots of great conversations with people who are doing courageous work all over the world on behalf of social/ecological justice. For example, a woman from Pakistan has organized women to stand against the oppression of women there; a person from Africa is helping people who have suffered through genocidal trauma. A team from India is using theatre to transform people from being victims to being change agents, etc. They all said they were

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wanted every child to receive the best education . Although Adler did not explain Dewey’s or Hutchins’s ideas of what comprises the best education, he defined it as one in which students learned about things that were es- sential to a human’s life . While some students had opportunities to learn about the life of the mind, other students underwent various types of vocational training . For Adler, training for an occupation was not an appropriate education for free men and women .5 Adler was correct in claiming that public opinion among Americans in 1982 favored en

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learners’ academic conception of English, I look at individual [examination] papers. My oral was weaker, but my listening was ok. I don’t think much about writing, but I know that I am not a particularly strong writer (Elyse, 1st interview, S7). While discussing English as an academic subject, the younger participants dissected their conceptions according to modes of assessment in school. Their conceptions of English were modelled upon the curriculum structure at schools. The younger participants focused on the English learning activities at school, which were