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otherwise do not speak. On Memory During my first sabbatical in 2009, I decided to spend several months in Pittsburgh. I was doing a project on Jewish cookbooks in America, consid- ering recipes and cookbooks as a form of life writing and researching how Jewish women in particular used this ready-made form to navigate faith and place. Living in Pittsburgh made it easier for me to get to libraries with strong cookbook holdings—in Boston, in Ann Arbor, in Lansing. I also wanted to interview my mother, who had converted to Judaism at 24 before marrying my father and

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members. One of the parents who participated in our study, Jiti, who had a Punjabi Sikh background, indicated that the film had captured the facets of his own upbringing and family life, commenting that the script writer must have had first- hand experience.1 Although the film is billed as a comedy, it points to the problematic nature of mixed-faith families, such as the clash of parental attitudes and expectations regarding religion and culture, which is often an underlying theme in the wider literature. The film is set in Salford, a town in Northern England, in

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- ordinates can be very helpful. Assuming a student does not know the English term for the German word Unterkunft (‘accommodation’), he may draw on the sub-ordinate term house. If he does not know the English term dresses, he could simplify by using clothes or women’s clothes. Synonyms or antonyms can be replaced easily (for example, clever vs. bright or beautiful vs. ugly). Another sort of simplification is the use of compounds. A dog kennel can be described as a dog house and a counter defined as a shop table. 3 See Haß (2006: 180) for more information. 244

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talk about obesity skepticism rather than critical obesity studies. Some of the high profile North American obesity skeptics have tended to make the charges of incompetence, dishonesty and opportunism against mainstream obesity researchers. For example, writers like Paul Campos (2004) and J. Eric Oliver (2006) have argued that the ‘obesity epidemic’ is essentially a myth or, in fact, a grand hoax. They question the intelligence of obesity researchers and point to the money and prestige that is at stake in the study of obesity and the search for pharmaceutical

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. kincheloe see a curriculum that erases the ways, for example, the power of racism shapes the daily life of all peoples, institutions, and power relations in the United States. Many White students living lives isolated from the negative effects of racism and operating without a larger racial consciousness are not aware of this curricular neglect of the power of race. In such a context they see noth- ing unusual about an education that rarely deals with issues of race. African American and Latino students, however, often see a very different reality. Their historical

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. 53). In the late 19th century, immigrants from around the world were pouring into the United States. They fled persecution and poverty, seeking a new life with opportunities for education and work. They came by the millions from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, often with little more than the clothes they wore. The 1890 census showed that of Chicago’s 1.1 million people, 855,000 were either foreign born or their U.S.-born children. If anything, foreign-born residents were undercounted, so perhaps fewer than 10% of the people in Chicago at that time

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Kitchen, Martha Rosler questions the traditional roles commonly assigned to women in North America well into the 1970s, prior to the full emergence of the feminist movement. Using common kitchen gadgets, Rosler performs a series of actions that are at times funny, odd, and even violent; these actions challenge the widely held notion that “a woman’s place is in the kitchen.” The video uses the letters of the alphabet—from A to Z—as a device to structure the artist’s actions: Rosler presents kitchen gadgets in a sequence that corresponds to each letter of the

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the African American community in Harlem, New York. Regardless, each child rep- resents a distinct, collective genetic and cultural inheritance that has endured for hundreds of years. Third, each child embodies their own individual psychological development in that time and space. A student might start the first day of school as a voracious reader while another struggles to sound out words. Another child might be able to write an extended story while her peer has only just learned to draw consonants to label the pictures he has illustrated. The cultural

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empowerment through research. American Journal of Community Psychology 18 (1), pp. 41-54. Fonseca, A., Macdonald, A., Dandy, E. and Valenti, P. (2011), The state of sustainability reporting at Canadian universities. International Journal for Sustainability in Higher Education 12 (1), pp. 22-40. Gaventa, J. and Cornwall, A. (2006), Challenging the Boundaries of the Possible: Participation, Knowledge and Power. IDS Bulletin 37 (6), pp. 122-128. Ginsborg, P. (2005), The Politics of Everyday Life. Making Choices, changing Lives. Yale University Press, New York. 360

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factory farm vs. family farm are not successfully upheld if the temporal reference point of the film is destabilized. On a different level, the fairy-tale structure is reiterated through an off-screen voice. The omniscient narrator is performed by Roscoe Lee Browne, an African American (voice) actor. Given the knowledge of Browne’s ethnicity, the statements he utters might be read as implying a plurality of ethnic being (e.g. “our valley,” the use of an inclusive first person plural) but they are displaced by the absence of any people of color in the scenes