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incorporation of diverse religious ideologies. Specifically, Hill cleverly makes use of other intertextual allusions along with an array of Black linguistic varieties, devices and systems to engage in the historic Black art of storytelling through the contemporary medium of a rap battle (verbal dueling) while indexing the underlying moral and spiritual prism. To achieve this, Hill traverses the continuum of Black oral traditions from what has been referred to as African American Language (AAL) to Jamaican Creole or “Patwa,” variably and strategically employing well

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power with few restrictions, a trend that perhaps influenced emerging leaders once they were in power themselves. The persistence of deeply entrenched practices that emphasise the power imbalance between women and men seems to highlight that there are still deep power divisions in many African tribal cultures, divisions that seem relatively unaffected by colonialism. The high prevalence of child marriages—for example, 46% of girls below the age of 18 years are married in SSA compared with 21% in Latin America and the Caribbean (The Elders, 2012)—and initiation

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every person worthy of note within the field. Nevertheless, we wanted these to be representative. Our selection process was: First, we included African American composers, singers, musicians choosing from all historical periods, and from among both men and women. Second, we included as many as possible of the “firsts” in African American Music. Likewise, we made sure to profile African American composers, singers, musicians who are particularly well known inside academia and in our communities. Finally, each entry provides a brief description of the person’s most

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Mary, she tracks down the honey makers. Fugitives from the law and Owens’s father, the two find shelter in a pink house that is home to three beekeeping African American sisters. These three women host a spiritual group of African American (mostly) women who regularly gather at the home around an ancient ship’s female figurehead, whom the group refers to as “Mary” and “Our Lady of Chains” (p. 90), and worship in an amalgamation of Catholicism and African slave spiritual tradition. A film version of the book, starring Queen Latifah and Alicia Keys, was released in

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song are (1) an acknowledgement of suppressing systems on poor youth and (2) an insertion of eschatological graspings. Eboni Marshall Turman is an Assistant Professor of Theology and African American Religion at Yale Divinity School. Her work converges on the intersections of womanist and feminist liberation theologies and ethics, Black radical ← 264 | 265 → traditions, Black women and theological liberalisms, Black womanist aesthetics and dogmatics in the African American Christian tradition (“Yale Divinity School”). She is also ordained in the National Baptist

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control: African Canadian women teachers’ lives and practice. Albany: State University of New York Press. Higginbotham, E. (1996). Getting all students to listen: Analyzing and coping with student resistance. American Behavioral Scientist, 40 (2), 203–211. hooks, b. (1990). Yearning: Race, gender, and cultural politics . Boston: South End. hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York: Routledge. Jackson, J. L. (2005). Beyond the quest for paradigmatic coherence: Double-consciousness, Afrocentricity, and multicontextualism

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women do not succeed. I must succeed. As an African woman living in the United States, the world is a place where intelligence, beauty, and culture have already been defined by someone else and I have to either conform or rebel. African, Christian, woman, student, educator, critical scholar. Can these roles blend together like metals to produce a stronger alloy? These are the first words I wrote during my first course on the first day of my doctoral program. These words have emerged time and time again in my journey as a graduate student, science teacher, and even to

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of Africa: Gnosis, philosophy, and the order of knowledge. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Mulura, F. (2009, September). Paulo Freire’s development education methodology . Retrieved from http://www.crvp.org/book/Series02/II-10/CH18.HTM Naipaul, V. S. (2002). The writer and the world. London, England: Picador. Nyamuke, A. I. (2011, July). Keynote address presented at the International Transforming Education conference, Darwin, Australia. Okri, B. (1999). Mental flight. London, England: Phoenix House. Said, E. W. (1993). Culture and imperialism

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Coast Press. ← 555 | 556 → Clinchy, B. M. (2002). Revisiting women’s ways of knowing. In B. K. Hofer & P. R. Pintrich (Eds.), Personal epistemology: The psychology of beliefs about knowledge and knowing (pp. 63–88). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Coiro, J., Knobel, M., Lankshear, C., & Leu, D. (Eds.). (2008). The handbook of research on new literacies . Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Cole, J. B., & Guy-Sheftall, B. (2003). Gender talk: The struggle for omen’s equality in African American communities . New York: Random House. Collins, J. (1995). Literacy and

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educational psychology reader | 611 → CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR Urban Dropouts Why Persist? Greg S. Goodman & Adriel A. Hilton As we are all too keenly aware, the national educational statistics tell a very troubling and foreboding story about life for students within America’s urban classrooms (Banks & Banks, 1989; National Center for Education Statistics, 2006). African American students embody 17 percent of the total U.S. student population, but African American teachers represent only 6 percent of all teachers in the U.S. ( Leaving Schools , 2004). For Hmong and