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racial identity. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 2 (1), 18–39. Shipp, P. L. (1983). Counseling Blacks: A group approach. The Personnel and Guidance Journal, 62 (2), 108–111. Shorter-Gooden, K. (2009). Therapy with African American men and women. In H. A. Neville, B. M. Tynes, & S. O. Utsey (Eds.), Handbook of African American psychology (pp. 445–458). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Spencer, M. B. (1995). Old issues and new theorizing about African American youth: A phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory. In R. L. Taylor (Ed.), Black

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enmeshed in literary studies and academia. First, Alexander recommends a shift in the reading material typically assigned. Working with prior research on this subject (Schaub, 2003; Alexander, 2011), Alexander examines incorporating texts by women, writers of color, non-Christian, non-Western(ized), and LGBTQIA+ writers into every literature course in conjunction with canonical pieces. Second, Alexander advises that beginning in the first- and second-year courses, literary theories that challenge hegemonic masculinity, such as gender studies, queer theory, postcolonial

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school receive free or reduced lunch. Nearly the same percentage (98%) of the students attending this school is African American. A slightly smaller percentage (90%) of the teachers is African American. Both administrators are African American women. I spend much of my volunteering time as a teacher’s assistant in a 3rd grade classroom. Because this is a benchmark year for assessment and promotion or retention, much of what occurs in this classroom is centered on preparation for the state’s standardized test. Students spend hours sitting at their desks engaged in tasks

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formation of the working class in the nineteenth century—to conflate terms like freeman or independent mechanic with white. ←96 |  97→ White Settlers and Red Indians The term• white arose as a designation for European explorers, traders and settlers who came into contact with Africans and the indigenous people of the Americas. As such, it appeared even before permanent British settlement in North America. Its early usages in America served as much to distinguish European settlers from Native Americans as to distinguish Africans from Europeans. 5 Thus, the

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). The shame of the nation. New York: Crown Publishers. Ladson-Billings, G. (1994). The dreamkeepers: Successful teachers of African American children. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. ← 198 | 199 → Lave, J. (1996). “Teaching, as learning in practice.” Mind, Culture, and Activity, 3 (3), 149–164. Lave, J., & E. Wenger. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Lazin, L. (Writer). (2003). Tupac: Resurrection. Atlanta, GA: Amaru Entertainment. Lee, C. (2004). “Literacy in the academic disciplines and

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(Adams [Ed.], 1996) which was a collection of pieces from recent immigrants who had settled in the Uptown community on the north side of Chicago; and, finally, JOT collections from African American writers in other parts of the city. To support their interactions and response to the texts, I asked the students to choose favorite selections among the various readings and make dialectical journal entries in which they would focus initially on the authors’ messages and then identify why the selections were important to them as readers. In their journals, students

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others in the group down, too. While I do think this unspoken “effect” has its basis in some bit of truth in our collective past—and for many Whites today with little or no exposure to African Americans—I think the effect has lessened its grip on White consciousness. In a similar sense, Black people have changed, too. Many Blacks held over-arching and stereotypical views of White people as “the man” (including White ←46 |  48→ women) and the creators of all things bad that happen to African Americans. This led many African Americans to be suspicious around White co

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Performance Olga Idriss Davis, Associate Professor, Arizona State University The dissertation-turned-book-inspired ethnography of Robin Boylorn is a gift of Story. It is a compelling examination of the lives of poor, rural African American women at the precipice of life and challenge. Their personae are clear, embellished only by their lived experience of love, loss, regret, and resilience. The performative voice is impressive and is waiting to be realized; revealing the complicated ← 165 | 166 → meanderings of lives lived by Black women in a community of other mothers

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. London. Combe, C. 2009. The Women Question in Vocational Education. In The Uganda Higher Education Review. Vol 6. No. 1, 30–34. Comaroff, J. & John, L. (2012): Theory from the South: Or, How Euro-America is Evolving toward Africa. London. Daly, R. & Mjelde, L. 2000. Learning at the Point of Production: New Challenges in the Social Divisions of Knowledge. In Boud, D. et al. (eds.) Working Knowledge: Productive Learning at Work. Sydney. Egau, J. O. 2002. Meeting the Challenges of Technical/Vocational Education. The Ugandan Experience. Workforce Education Forum 29 (1), 1

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Publications, Inc., 1998. Bauerlein, Mark. The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (Or Don’t Trust Anyone Under Thirty). New York, England, Canada, Ireland, India, New Zealand, South Africa: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin: a Member of the Penguin Group, 2008. ———. “Graduates’ Professionalism Gap.” Bloomberg News , 17 May 2013. ———. “What’s the Point of a Professor?” New York Times , May 10, 2015. Bellow, Saul. More Die of Heartbreak. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc. 1987. ———. It