Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 250 items for :

  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
  • All content x
  • Chapters/Articles x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Series:

Part 1 Theories of Critical Black studies Part 1 offers perspectives on critical Black studies that ground the Black experience, offers fresh ideas and concepts to the study of the Black experience, and offers strategical or social change theories. Thus, theoretical perspectives are offered that serve not only african american studies but also the broader areas of ethnic, Women and Gender, and Cultural studies. drawing from postcolonial frameworks, in chapter 1, “remarks on Frantz Fanon’s Thought: deconstructing ‘White Mythologies,’ domenica Maviglia offers

Restricted access

at Rio Nuevo in St. Mary, Jamaica, a site that sits in the neighborhood where my family resides. As the Spanish fled, they freed the slaves so that the British would not have them. These slaves escaped into the mountains along with the remaining Native Americans, setting in motion the forging of Maroon societies. A Terrible Trade: The Development of the Slave Trade and Slavery On the continent of Africa, Africans were collected by small coastal tribes carrying out raids against the people. They captured men, women, and chil- dren and then sold them into

Restricted access

Series:

african americans of ways to properly conduct themselves during a police encounter so as not to get killed. They perpetuate society’s impropriety of placing the onus for staying alive on the potential victim, as opposed to holding a corrupt and racist system, maintained by corrupt and racist officers, accountable for their abhorrent actions. This is equivalent to telling women how to conduct themselves so as not to get raped, as opposed to holding rapists accountable for their heinous violence against women. C h a p t e r 1 9 When the Church Sins The Violence of

Restricted access

fiction; US gender studies are pioneered by the theses of Angels Carabí Ribera on Toni Mor- rison (Barcelona, 1987), Esther Álvarez López on Afro-American women’s fiction (Oviedo, 1989) and Carlos Martín Gaebles (Seville, 1989) on gay fiction. Isabel Carrera Suarez’s comparative study of short story women writers (Oviedo, 1988) is the first to adopt a transnational approach to women’s literature, combining postcolonial and gender theory. Mercedes Bengoechea Bartolomé’s work on Adrienne Rich (Madrid, 1991) opens the productive 1990s with a study of language and

Restricted access

Series:

additional “gendered” framework for my scholarship in CRT. The relationship between race and gender (and other identify markers) has been historically contentious. Anna Julia Cooper, a contemporary of W. E. B. Du Bois was one of the most vocal African American women to address the “woman problem” as it related to the “Negro problem” (Lemert & Bahn, 1998). Political philosopher Joy James (1996) noted that although Du Bois is often described as a champion of women’s rights, his actions often belied his “theoretical” gender politics. While James described Du Bois as a

Restricted access

Series:

College Press. Anzaldúa, G. (1984). “Speaking in tongues: A letter to third world women writers.” In C. Moraga & G. Anzaldúa (Eds.), This bridge called my back: Writings by radical women of color (pp. 167–168). New York: Kitchen Ta- ble/Women of Color Press. Anzaldúa, G. (1987). “Movimientos de rebeldía y las culturas que tra- icionan.” In Borderlands/la frontera: The new mestiza. San Francisco: Aunt Lute. Anzaldúa, G. (1996/2001). Prietita and the ghost woman/Prietita y la llorona. San Francisco: Children’s Book Press. Anzaldúa, G. (1997). Friends from the

Restricted access

Series:

, finally, JOT collections from African American writers in other parts of the city. To support their interactions and re- sponse to the texts, I asked the students to choose favorite selections among the various readings and make dialectical journal entries in which they would focus initially on the authors’ messages and then identify why the selections were im- portant to them as readers. In their journals, students divided each page into two columns. In the left column they made entries that focused on what they believed to be the author’s intended meaning. In the

Restricted access

Jewish heritage, Native American studies, African American heritage, Hispanic heritage, and international women’s history. I intentionally seek to engage their interest by elevating contemporary music such as reggae from Jamaica, rap in the United States, and reggaetón in Latin America, as part of the curriculum, guiding them to investigate how these forms of music may be interpreted as articulating the social history of disenfranchised people. Most of the students are familiar with Bob Marley’s music and we listen to the lyrics of “One Love” and discuss how

Restricted access

Series:

–31. Dei, G. (1994). Afrocentricity: A cornerstone of pedagogy. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 25(1), 3–28. Dixson, A. (2003). “Let’s do this!” Black women teacher’s politics and pedagogy. Urban Edu- cation, 38(2), 217–235. Elson, R. (1964). Guardians of tradition: American schoolbooks of the nineteenth century. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Eppse, M.R. (1938). The Negro, too, in American history. Chicago: National Education Publish- ing Company. Ernest, J. (2004). Liberation historiography: African American writers and the challenge of history, 1794

Restricted access

Series:

Cultural Studies, 26(4), 313–337. Fine, M. (1994). Dis-stance and other stances: Negotiations of power inside feminist research. Power and Method. London: Routledge. Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum. Greeno, J. (1997). On claims that answer the wrong questions. Educational Researcher, 26(1), 5–17. Harbour, P. (2012). Community educators: A resource for educating and developing our youth. Dayton, OH: Kettering Foundation Press. Hilliard, A.G. (1978). Free your mind, return to the source: The African origin of civilization. San Francisco