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Professor (endowed profes- sor) and chair of the Educational Theory and Leadership Department at UGA. She is Nana Mansa II of Mpeasem, Ghana, West Africa. Her research interests include critical teacher education, spirituality in education, and African American feminist studies. Beyond a plethora of published articles and book chapters, two of her books, On Spiri- tual Strivings: Transforming an African American Woman’s Academic Life (SUNY Press, 2006) and Learning to (Re)member the Things We’ve Learned endarkened feminist epistemology 57 to Forget: Endarkened

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Prudence Carter, our first African American women Dean of the GSE. We do not always agree, but I think we do see a shift from being defensive to being a part of the offense at a critical moment in the School’s development. Our immediate challenges have become sustainability and resource generation in the new climate of higher education. I am proud of the success and impact on the field my graduate students have had as professors, researchers, urban teachers, superintendents of city and state school systems, presidents of academic organizations like the National

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Europeans. The “right” an- swer for the Europeans was that the massive death toll was a sign from G-d that this land was rightfully for them (Loewen, 1995). It confirmed their idea Daniel Ethan Chapman xvi that they had a claim to the land. European interests were connected to G-d’s will justifying their self-serving interpretation. At a different time, on the coast of Georgia in 1854, there was a large outbreak of yellow fever among the Euro- pean American population, but not on the African American slave population. Given the similarity between the two

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educative efforts (CTE) in community colleges. According to Rivera-Batiz (1995): Both the public and the private sector sponsor a variety of postsecondary vocational programs. Ethnic and racial minorities tend to have much higher rates of participation in public sector programs. According to the NALS data, of working people, close to 86 | minding the obligation gap in communit y colleges and beyond 5 percent of African American men and 6.6 percent of African American women had participated in a public sector postsecondary training program, compared to only 1

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– 177). Rotterdam: Sense. Schubert, W. H., Schubert, A. L. L., Thomas, T. P., & Carroll, W. M. (2002). Curriculum books: The first hundred years (2nd ed.). New York: Peter Lang. Schultz, B. (2008). Spectacular things happen along the way: Lessons from an urban classroom. New York: Teachers College Press. Scott, J. W. (1999). Gender and the politics of history (Rev. ed.). New York: Columbia University Press. Scott-Simmons, W. (2008). Self, others, and jump rope communities: Oral history of the triumphs of African American women. In M. F. He & J. A. Phillion (Eds

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, & Cunningham, 1991). The macrolevel variables include societal discrimination and stereotypes. As I will illustrate in this article, the research of Claude Steele (1998, 2004) on stereotype threat began in an effort to understand some underlying mechanisms that account for differences in achievement outcomes; and I emphasize here some, certainly not all. But this initial attention to African Americans from an asset-based and ecological orientation has also yielded fundamental propositions about the ways in which macrolevel negative perceptions can negatively influence

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- logue marking the entry of jazz, by cultural historians, musicologists, and ethnomusicologists, has been noted by Monson [1996: 2–10]. Within this developing perspective, attempts at definitions, origins, evolution, styles and interpretations of meanings ‘subject the music to particular readings and agendas’ [Clark, 2001: 3]. For example in musicological terms, jazz is a blend of traditions [African; European and later, Afro-American], and as Ake [2002: 2] noted, ‘perhaps the most culturally promiscuous music of 182 Appendix B the twentieth century’. Here, the

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. The energy of hip- hop includes everything from the African American call and response of a ”ha yo” ”al ight” at any given gathering to the framing of comedy to the creation of clothing lines, it’s a look, a feel like cotton; its distinctive. You know when you see it. Hip- hop is a collective, it’s a life that continuously evolves. Those of the Golden hip- hop era lay claim to pure authentic hip- hop, and mil- lennials claim to have transformed the genre with instant access. All of the claims have some merit in regard to what we know and accept as hip- hop

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humanity” (27)? At the height of the Theory Wars, Christian’s intervention was a timely reminder that a plurality of epistemolog- ical positions was open and available when considering African American (re)pro- duction of knowledge. Indeed, this crucial observation serves as a prescient warning against an absolutist reading of Gayatri Spivak’s oft repeated claim, “The subaltern cannot appear without the thought of the elite.” It is in this spirit that I believe we can (re)turn to the construct of local knowledge as, in the words of Joan Scott, “an epistemicides 277

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, physics, biology, etc. • Have students conduct research reports on well-known African Americans, Latino/as, Native Americans, etc. • Have students conduct oral histories with a female relative • Institute a rites of passage program at your school for young men and women Venus Evans-Winters and Christie Ivie206 Sexuality education as part of sex education could be very controversial. However, consistent with the goals of analyzing and discussing oppression through feminist pedagogy, it would be an important step forward in reaching out to gay, lesbian, bisexual