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action” for white people: The G. I. Bill of Rights, as “The 1944 Serviceman’s Readjustment Act” was known, is arguably the most massive affirmative action program in American history. … I call it affirmative action because it was aimed at and disproportionately helped male, Euro-origin GIs … [Benefits] were decidedly not extended to African Amer- icans or to women of any race. Theoretically they were available to all veterans; in practice women and black veterans did not get anywhere near their share. (Brodkin, p. 38, 42) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day

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). Retaining each other: Narratives of two African American women in the academy. Urban Review, 37(3), 221–242. Grant, C. M., & Ghee, S. (2015). Mentoring 101: Advancing African-American women faculty and doctoral student success in predominantly White institutions. International Journal of Qualita- tive Studies in Education, 28(7), 759–785. Gregory, S. T. (2001). Black faculty women in the academy: History, status and future. The Journal of Negro Education, 70(3), 124–138. hooks, b. (1981). Ain’t I a woman?: Black women and Feminism. Boston, MA: South End Press. Hull

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between churches, the role of pastors, how churches have changed, their importance in African-American communities, disputes and disagreements within churches, and so on. They talked about how church communities and reli- gious beliefs had helped them in everyday living and during crises. From a simple two-sentence piece of writing I had nearly dismissed as “get- ting over” grew a discussion about how people create institutions to deal with the difficulties they face and how articles of belief influence every day life. The discus- sion had its effect. The author had

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of a South African community. Spe- cifically, the study investigates how critical consciousness can be used to prevent intimate partner violence and HIV infection. Similar to the research by Brodsky et al. (2012), the study centres predominantly around female participants, due to the patriarchal nature of sexual oppression experienced by females in South Af- rica. Hatcher et al. (2011) justify this focus, noting that “gender inequalities and women’s social and economic dependency can increase risk by reducing bargain- ing power around decisions like sexual

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plantation porches. We see representations of the Yoruba culture, a reminder of the inexplicable link between Africa and American slavery (Reid, 2016). While these powerful visuals remind us that slavery is very much still part of American culture and collective memory, it is juxtaposed with images showing the strength, power, beauty, and resilience of modern-day Black women. Lemonade masterfully connects the past with the present using imagery that unapologetically celebrates and affirms the cultural, experiential, and historical knowledge of Black women. It is

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Afew opening remarks about my background and how I have come to engage this topic; I seethe personal subject[ive] location as critical in terms of what brings me to the topic. The con- textualization of writer/self as a methodological and discursive feature of any textual discussion is significant. It helps the reader to understand the perspective from which one is conducting the analy- sis. And by perspective, I do not mean just ideology or analytical framework, but a personal account- ing of why I write about what I do. I am a social anthropologist by academic

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Cornel to name a few—added new courses to their curricula and created African American Studies programs (Mohanty, 2003). In 1969, the University of California at Berkeley instituted a department of ethnic studies, divided into Afro- American, Chicano, Asian-American, and Native American studies di- visions (Mohanty, 2003). The development of women’s studies pro- grams was also part of this history and transformation of academia. D Migrations Through Academia 65 Feminist scholars, Frances A. Maher and Mary K. Thompson Tetreault (2007, p. 2) remind us that

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race as a concept, or, as Smedley and Smedley (2012) argued, as a worldview. Writer and cultural critic Ta-Nehisi Coates (Demary, 2015) underscored the way anti-blackness represents a paradigm that links blackness and death together in ways that make them synonymous. No good life outcomes are associated with blackness. Although the documenting of this instantiation throughout American culture is beyond the scope of this chapter, I will focus on how it functions in schooling. School Segregation Although we are more than 60 years past the landmark Brown v. Board

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devaluation of black women. Racist and sex- ist stereotypes, she maintains, continue to play a significant role in constructing the identity and behavior of African American women in the United States. With these understandings embed- ded in her consciousness, hooks as a young woman began to examine the racial dynamics of the women’s movement. Arguing that no common bond among all women existed, hooks took the women’s movement of the 1970s to task for ignoring the role of racism in the oppression of women. Because the white and often upper- middle- class

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Reading 95 Multiple Literacies in a Digital Society 95 The Technological Fix 107 Business, Efficiency, and the Flat World 115 Chapter Five: The Future of Reading 127 A Unified Field of Vision 127 New Literacies and Literatures 137 Readers or Writers? 153 Index 157 INTRODUCTION THE END OF READING BIG CHANGES have been taking place in reading in recent years. While American society has become more visual and digital, the gen- eral state of literacy in America is in crisis, with educators and public officials worried about