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also noted by writers on the American scene (cf. Chapter 5). If incidents relating to ethnicity did arise within the school system, they could, however, be hurtful and continue to rankle as with the person in my survey who said that in primary, junior secondary and senior secondary schools, people had openly criticized her religion and culture. Some forms of prejudice concerned other young pupils and their youthful rejection of anything that did not fit with what was the normal mould for them rather than teaching personnel. One respondent suggested that any

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women thus occurs in a field already marked with the designs and biases written into it by coloni- alism… Consequently, awareness of this legacy […] needs itself to be the starting point of any such investigation. (Ahmed, 1993, p. 45). As Mr and Mrs Bush’s pseudo-feminist designs on Afghanistan prove, such an undertaking – in a world where much of the Western Left is totally ignorant as to how to express its solidarity with the Middle East in its struggle against American and Israeli domination – is more pressing today than ever before. In the West, the thorough

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English language; . . . but also their etymologies from the ancient and modern languages: and accents directing to their proper pronunciation. London: T. Osborne & J. Shipton; J. Hodges; R. Baldwin; W. Johnston, and J. Ward. Sealey-Ruiz, Y. (2007). Wrapping the curriculum around their lives: Using a culturally relevant curriculum with African American adult women. Adult Education Quarterly, 58(1), 44–60. Shannon, C. E., & Weaver, W. (1949). A mathematical model of communication. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press. Shannon, T. R. (1996). An introduction to

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political philosophy of cosmopolitanism (pp. 1–9). New York: Cambridge University Press. Buber, M. (2002). Between man and man. New York: Routledge. Butler, J. (1990). Gender trouble: Feminism and the subversion of identity. New York: Routledge. references 377 Cahill, S. (2004). Introduction. In S. Cahill (Ed.), Women write: A mosaic of women’s voices in fiction, poetry, memoir, and essay (pp. xiii–xv). New York: New American Library. Caine, R. S. E. (2008). Encouraging compassion in education: A non-anthropocentric perspec- tive. In J. Gray-Donald & D. Selby (Eds

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, has been involved in a similar task in relation to the role of the Communist Party in educating generations of militants. Taking a Gramscian perspective, Paula Allman (2001) addresses the centrality of alliance building under proletarian hegemony – involving different social movements and popular forces – as a key issue in critical and progressive educational work. An example of the impor- tance of this was the alliance between anti-racist struggle and class politics in action against apartheid in the old South Africa in which, incidentally, radical academics

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history of being perceived as foreigners and the practice of reading ethnic Americans as proxies for international texts perpetuates this understanding of minorities as foreigners. Chinese-American author Amy Tan agrees; representing a distinctly American point of view, Tan’s texts belong in an American canon, she maintains. If I had to give myself any sort of label, I would have to say that I am an American writer. I am Chinese by racial heritage. I am Chinese-American by family and social upbringing. But I believe that what I write is American fiction by

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of the oppressed.” United States: Noam Chomsky Videos. Retrieved from https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=-SOw55BU7yg#t=610 Cipriano, R. E. (2011). Facilitating a collegial department in higher education [Kindle]. Retrieved from Amazon.com. Collective, C. (1995). Breaking anonymity: The chilly climate for women faculty. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. Collings, S., Conner, L., McPherson, K., Midson, B., & Wilson, C. (2010). Learning to be leaders in higher education: What helps or hinders women’s advancement as lead- ers in universities

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. Operating in this multilog- ical manner, bricoleurs, for example, might study some women’s capacity to understand the feel- ings of other individuals because in Western patriarchal cultures women often sense a greater need to develop this capacity. Such abilities often emerge in asymmetrical relations of power, as African American slaves understood their need to interpret their master’s state of mind in order to escape punishment. Thus, researchers use diverse voices in differing historical situations to thicken the knowledges they produce (Weinstein, 1995; Noone and

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for critiquing and problematising the residues of the past upon the current Other, or more specifically in the Indian context, upon subaltern groups, such as certain groups of women, religious minorities, lower-caste groups, children living on the street, and families living on the street (Thapar, 2005). By highlighting the history of Indian oppression and resistance, the ongoing crests of ethnic and religious vio- lence, and the effects of neoliberal marketised ideologies, this chapter seeks to elu- cidate the emergent and contextual nature of social

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Much more is lost in translation than the precise scent of a pot of raspberry tea: the influence of particular social position that makes the conversation possible; what each speaker meant to say; other voices in the writer’s head—from a radio program about women, from the glorified male writers who might (or might not) confess some debt to some woman … on and on. Indeed, no writer ever can choose all the possibilities, or even the best possibilities. And yet, Luce-Kapler makes clear how very much can be rendered through the imperfect choices open to any writer