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primitiva de Hispania Tarraconense y Bética (Albertos Firmat 1966), Antroponimia indígena de la Lusitania romana (Vallejo Ruiz 2005), Elementos de un atlas antroponímico de la Hispania antigua (Untermann 1965), Monumenta Linguarum Hispanicarum (Untermann 1990, Untermann 1997, Wodtko 2000) 5 , Los nombres personales en las inscripciones latinas de Hispania (Abascal Palazón 1994), Die griechischen Personennamen auf der Iberischen Halbinsel (Lozano Velilla 1998), Die germanischen Personennamen in Katalonien. Namensammlung und Etymologisches (Kremer 1969

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La conquista imaginaria de América: crónicas, literatura y cine | 29 → 2. Cristóbal Colón y el Descubrimiento de Las Indias 2.1 El Diario de a bordo y las Cartas del descubrimiento Hay tantas versiones históricas con distintos enfoques ideológicos sobre Colón y el Descubrimiento de América que una reconstrucción y comparación de todas ellas daría materia más que suficiente para una investigación propia que destacara su interpretación como genio, usurpador, pícaro, aventurero, excéntrico, iluminado, santo, mártir, perseguido etc. Puesto que no soy historiadora

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evolución fue menos acusada: además del popular nombre cristiano par exellence María se han podido mantener los tradicionales Elvira, Xemena, Sancha, Urraca , etc. (Kremer 1992: 464). A partir de finales del siglo XV, el idioma y los nombres españoles se transmitieron al Nuevo Mundo. Mediante un análisis de los nombres de 40.000 colonos españoles en América en el siglo XVI, Boyd-Bowman (1970: 12) llega a la conclusión de que una clara mayoría de las personas estudiadas llevaba alguno de los pocos nombres populares con origen en el Nuevo Testamento ( Juan, Pedro

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←59 |  60→ Latein der ersten Jahrhunderte nach Christus als Medien der Übersetzung von Kulturen beschreibend, führt er aus: Translatio is a word of the lingua franca of the Roman Empire, which was itself a large system of translation of cultures […]. But when the Roman Empire was no longer an empire of Rome, […] when Romania slowly replaced Rome, then Latin as the lingua franca began to merge with local languages and dialects and to transform itself into lingua romana, which was only a common denominator for a multitude of local differences. […] Latin got a new

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and a good … voluptuous figure, high cheek bones and a snub nose … In her dark melancholy eyes Ashenden saw the boundless steppes of Russia.’10 Galsworthy’s response to the Russian theme was in all respects different from this sentimentalised compliment to the exotic. Galsworthy also made a trip to Russia in his mid-twenties, arranged by his father to exert a settling influence on his son’s failing legal career.11 In 1917, he produced a rather unremarkable poem, Russia-America, infused by the war-time patriotic spirit: A wind in the world! O Company Of

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, 1917). Garnett, Richard David, Constance Garnett: A Heroic Life (London: Sinclair–Ste- venson, 1991). Gel’rot, M., ‘Nitsshe i Gorky, Russkoe bogatstvo 5 (1903), pp. 24–65. Gettmann, Royal, Turgenev in England and America (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1941). Gindin, James, John Galsworthy’s Life and Art (London: Macmillan, 1987). Glendinning, Victoria, Leonard Woolf: A Biography (New York and London: Free Press, 2006). Gold, Arthur, and Robert Fizdale, Misia: The Life of Misia Sert (York: Morrow Quill Paperbacks, 1981). Goldsmith, Oliver, ‘Citizen of the

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-rich works by writers such as Livy, Ovid, and Petronius, Frassetto examines Lucretia’s near-ubiquitous presence and manifold transformations throughout the ages. She nods toward the matron’s consecration not only in literary artifacts, but also in the visual arts, music, and in a film as recent as Kinugasa Teinosuke’s Gate of Hell (Jigokumon, 1953). Leaning upon this wider base, Frassetto’s book carefully examines three key writings of the eighteenth century, each of which belonging to distinct linguistic and cultural contexts: Carlo Goldoni’s Lugrezia romana in

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-Epigraphische Mitteilungen aus Österreich-Ungarn. ANSMN = The American Numismatic Society. Museum Notes. BMNB = Bulletin du Musée National de Bourgas. DLZ = Deutsche Literaturzeitung für Kritik der internationalen Wissenschaft. JIArchNum = Journal International d’Archéologie Numismatique. KSIA = Kratkie soobshcheniya Instituta Arkheologii Akademii Nauk SSSR (Bref Bulletin de l’Institut d’Archéologie de l’Académie des Sciences de l’URSS). MAL = Monumenti Antichi dei Lincei. MBNG = Mitteilungen der Bayerischen Numismatischen Gesellschaft. MEP = Minima Epigraphica et Papyrologica. QuadMess

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2 The fate of Hispanic American prose on the Polish publishing market 1 Sources and methodology This chapter is dedicated to discussing quantitative data concerning the presence of translations of Hispanic American prose on the Polish publishing market and editors’ strategies related to this literature after WWII. My research focused on several bibliographical sources. First of all, I reached for Rymwid-Mickiewicz and Skłodowska’s study La recepción del libro hispanoamericano en Polonia (1945–90).32 So far it has been the most complete work dedicated to

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history, the ren ren (full humanity in loving others) and the Crucified God in his death as the firstborn do not accept the “will to power” of any ideology: not the violence of the Pax Romana, the murderous jealousy of Cain (Gen 4), or the Lion of Judah (Revelation). The ren ren will rule by means of virtue and not physical force. Confucius’ political ethics of de (virtue) has the drawing force of virtuous rulers guiding the nation by means of his moral excellence, without exerting physical force. Analects 2:1 writes that “those who rule with de (moral force) are