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challenges no longer consist in language mastery or knowledge of foreign ‘cultures’ that are shown as a given but, rather, in possibilities of individual growth and evolvement towards personal independence and maturity. A similar vision is largely adopted by actress Laura Weissmahr who also had a role in Júlia ist . In the interview she gave in the framework of the conference, Weissmahr addresses, among other things, the command of multiple languages – in her exceptional case, seven – as an increasingly normal capacity in young educated Europeans born and raised in

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/programmes/kirsties-vintage-home/on-demand/54293-005 > (accessed 25/11/2014). AAUW (1994) ‘Shortchanging Girls, Shortchanging America: Executive Summary’, AAUW , Available at: < http://www.aauw.org/resource/shortchanging-girls-shortchanging-america-executive-summary/ > (accessed 04/07/2014). abc (2014) ‘ Modern Family : Claire Dunphy Played by Julie Bowen’, abc , Available at: < http://abc.go.com/shows/modern-family/cast/character-claire > (accessed 20/10/2014). Addison, Heather (2009) ‘Modernizing Mother: The Maternal Figure in Early Hollywood’, in Motherhood Misconceived: Representing the Maternal in U

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Harvard University Press in fall 2013. 240 ways of understanding commensurate with the image’s virtual life. The desire to explain this experience by inventing or developing concepts adequate to thinking with or through it – call this, for the moment, theory – is inescapably caught up in, indeed engendered by, our confrontations with the ontological perplexities that screened images raise regarding our locatedness in time and in space, both in relation to the world and to each other through the medium of moving images. But am I not caught in paradox here? In a

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of the imagery in question, cinema is frequently treated more or less as a con- stant that is predetermined either by the codes of Hollywood or by its opposition to the latter as experimental cinema, both with their respective spectatorships, “complacent” or “critical.”2 The medial specificity and variations of the imagery – such as its particular audiovisual encoding, narrativity, technological media- tion, cultural history and materiality – is ignored or at best glossed over, its pre- cise imbrication with its surrounding space then being difficult to

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% in 1996, 60% in 1998) were found to contain violence and often included numerous violent acts. Much of the gratuitous violence ← 321 | 322 → is produced by Hollywood in movies that end up on TV. Not only are researchers concerned about the magnitude of violence on TV programs, the public also is worried. A national survey by the Pew Research Center (1997) reported that 75% of Americans say there is too much violence in non-news programs. But are people affected by it? Does heavy viewing of violence contribute to incivility and violent behavior? Research teams

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morality and doomed heroism”. There are also other main characters in the series who speak with markedly Northern accents not accounted for by their geographical origins, accents apparently deployed solely to highlight their moral integrity. For one thing, Samwell Tarly actually speaks with a Mancunian (i.e. Manchester) accent, although he was born in the South of Westeros and had not once been to the North before. Another character whose Northern, more precisely: Geordie (i.e. Newcastle) accent does not match his biography is Ser Davos Seaworth, born and raised in

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symbolism with which Aram invests his personal fig tree – displacement, and yet not placelessness – is multilayered. First, the fig tree is a transcultural symbol that simultaneously anchors him in different neighboring cultures. Second, it creates an indissoluble connection between Aram, an Armenian Christian, and the seemingly oppositional Turkish Islamic context where he was raised and feels at home. Third, the first two elements ultimately intertwine with the mythology ← 204 | 205 → surrounding the Tree of Life, namely, immortality through sacrifice. Such

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not simply upturned, but rooted in the sky. As a consequence, the symbol- ism with which Aram invests his personal fig tree – displacement, and yet not placelessness – is multilayered. First, the fig tree is a transcultural symbol that simultaneously anchors him in different neighboring cultures. Second, it cre- ates an indissoluble connection between Aram, an Armenian Christian, and the seemingly oppositional Turkish Islamic context where he was raised and feels at home. Third, the first two elements ultimately intertwine with the mythology Creation of

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the Obama administration of promoting “bad behavior” with the announcement of the expansion of bailouts that President Bush had initiated. Santelli (2009) shouted, This is America! How many of you people want to pay for your neighbour’s mortgage that has an extra bathroom and can’t pay their bills? Raise their hand. President Obama, are you listening? We’re thinking of having a Chicago Tea Party in July. All you capitalists that want to show up to Lake Michigan, I’m gonna start organizing. Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh transmitted the rant to a much

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as it advances. This suggests an aporia in the thinking of a relation between time and storage and Bergson raises the question that also perplexed Freud – where are memories stored? Yet, for Freud the problem of storage had to do with the inevitable finitude and hence exhaustibility of the space of inscription of memories – a dilemma he solved by translating the question of space into one of time and its intermittency (in the “Mystic Writing Pad” essay) (Freud 1961, pp. 225-232). Bergson argues that the question of storage is from the outset a spatial one