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  • Author or Editor: Bartosz Adamczewski x
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Edited by Bartosz Adamczewski

This series welcomes publications of European and also non-European scholars who specialize in theology, philosophy and history of religions. The series is intended to promote internationalization of the results of academic research on theological, philosophical and historical-religious questions. Contributions to the series may deal with both particular, narrow-range problems and synthetic, interdisciplinary issues. Likewise, the publications may refer to both systematic problems and more practical considerations. Especially welcome are scholarly works which deal with the significance of theological, philosophical and religious questions for modern Europe, thus enabling new ways of religion- and philosophy-based thinking about the European debates. The academic texts appearing in the series may have the forms of volume-length monographs, collections of articles, proceedings of academic societies, Festschriften, commemorative volumes as well as conference volumes.
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Genesis

A Hypertextual Commentary

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Bartosz Adamczewski

This monograph demonstrates that the book of Genesis is a result of highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the book of Deuteronomy. This detailed reworking consists of around 1,000 strictly sequentially organized conceptual, and at times also linguistic correspondences between Genesis and Deuteronomy. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on Deuteronomy explains numerous surprising features of Genesis. The critical analysis of Genesis as a coherently composed hypertextual work disproves hypotheses of the existence in this writing of Priestly and non-Priestly materials or multiple literary layers.

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Bartosz Adamczewski

This book demonstrates that the Gospels originated from a sequential hypertextual reworking of the contents of Paul’s letters and, in the case of Matthew and John, of the Acts of the Apostles. Consequently, the new quest for the historical Jesus, which takes this discovery into serious consideration, results in a rather limited reconstruction of Jesus’ life. However, since such a reconstruction includes, among others, Jesus’ messiahship, behaving in a way which was later interpreted as pointing to him as the Son of God, instituting the Lord’s Supper, being conscious of the religious significance of his imminent death, dying on the cross, and appearing as risen from the dead to Cephas and numerous other Jewish believers, it can be reconciled with the principles of the Christian faith.
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The Gospel of Mark

A Hypertextual Commentary

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Bartosz Adamczewski

This commentary demonstrates that the Gospel of Mark is a result of a consistent, strictly sequential, hypertextual reworking of the contents of three of Paul’s letters: Galatians, First Corinthians and Philippians. Consequently, it shows that the Marcan Jesus narratively embodies the features of God’s Son who was revealed in the person, teaching, and course of life of Paul the Apostle. The analysis of the topographic and historical details of the Marcan Gospel reveals that they were mainly borrowed from the Septuagint and from the writings of Flavius Josephus. Other literary motifs were taken from various Jewish and Greek writings, including the works of Homer, Herodotus, and Plato. The Gospel of Mark should therefore be regarded as a strictly theological-ethopoeic work, rather than a biographic one.
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Samuel–Kings

A Hypertextual Commentary

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Bartosz Adamczewski

The book demonstrates that the books of Samuel–Kings, taken together, are a result of one, highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the book of Deuteronomy. This detailed reworking consists of almost 2000 strictly sequentially organized, conceptual, and at times, also linguistic correspondences between Samuel–Kings and Deuteronomy. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on Deuteronomy explains numerous surprising features of Samuel–Kings. The critical analysis of Samuel–Kings as a coherently composed Judaean hypertextual work disproves the hypothesis of the existence of the Deuteronomistic history and its variants. It also sheds entirely new light on the question of the origin of the so-called Enneateuch Genesis–Kings.