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Still Not Equal

Expanding Educational Opportunity in Society

Christopher M. Brown II

Still Not Equal: Expanding Educational Opportunity in Society addresses the successes and failures of Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as well as the continuing challenge of expanding educational opportunity in the United States and across the Black diaspora. The educational, political, and social influence resulting from Brown, the Civil Rights Act, and their progeny have shaped the dynamics of the collective educational and social experiences of people of color. Notwithstanding, the obstacles, barriers, and enablers of educational, occupational, and economic status outcomes impact the formation and interpretation of public policy, specifically, and public perception, generally, about racialized notions of schooling and learning. The pursuit of educational access, attendance, and attainment is intertwined with the implications of academic research and public policy to improve local practices in school settings. Inasmuch as a diverse research agenda, priorities, and activities become situated to critically address status and attainment outcomes in education from preschool through adulthood for African Americans in the United States and abroad, the resulting complexities in education and other settings will continue to behave in ways that cross racial lines.
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Whiteness Is the New South Africa

Qualitative Research on Post-Apartheid Racism

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Christopher B. Knaus and M. Christopher Brown II

In 1994, the world joined South Africa in celebration of the results of its first democratic election. The results, emblazoned on the world’s memory with President Nelson Mandela waving to a multiracial crowd, signified the end of apartheid and an emerging new era of hope. However, Mandela’s recent death has given birth to a more critical view of his «Rainbow Nation.» No matter how examined, education in South Africa remains steadfastly unequal, with many White children retaining the educational privileges inherent to apartheid. White children in South Africa overwhelmingly attend wealthy, fully resourced schools, while the vast majority of Black and Coloured children attend woefully underresourced schools.
Based upon three sets of studies in schools in and around Cape Town, Whiteness Is the New South Africa highlights drastic racial disparities, suggesting that educational apartheid continues unabated, potentially fostering future generations of impoverished Black and Coloured communities. This book suggests that South Africa remains committed to stifling the intellectual, emotional, and economic development of Black and Coloured youth, while simultaneously investing in White children.
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School Matters

Why African American Students Need Multiple Forms of Capital

RoSusan Bartee and Christopher M. Brown II

There are four types of capital: economic, human, cultural, and social. The distribution of capital in home and school settings affects the types of educational outcomes and the quality of lifelong opportunities that individuals are able to enjoy. Resource availability and accessibility influence the success levels at which teaching and learning is experienced. Capital possession or acquisition impacts the ability to navigate the academic pipeline and to recognize the appropriate tools by which to do so. Minimal attempts have been taken to address different perspectives related to economic, human, cultural, and social capital. This book identifies the various tenets of capital as having shared similarities and/or differences, as well as reveals how the distribution of capital impacts educational settings. More specifically, this book reveals that given the increases in the parental education or the cultural capital of African Americans, no significant changes have occurred in the number of years that African-American children attend schools. This finding remains consistent in terms of the sort of cultural capital that they are able to gain. In sum, the research concludes that cultural capital does assume a significant role in the transfer of advantages that stem from middle- and upper-level socioeconomic backgrounds.
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The Children Hurricane Katrina Left Behind

Schooling Context, Professional Preparation, and Community Politics

Sharon P. Robinson and Christopher M. Brown II

Even before the 2005 «Disaster in the Delta» – as the devastation and loss wrought by the category-three hurricane known as Katrina came to be known – statistics emerged about the aggressive educational neglect of Louisiana’s African American schoolchildren. The harrowing data about the inadequacies being as racialized as the distribution of aid in the storm’s aftermath are chilling indeed. Yet, they have not dissuaded the more than thirty contributors to this volume from viewing Hurricane Katrina as an opportunity and a challenge to transform schools and society for the good of the entire United States. Divided into three sections («Education and School Contexts,» «Preparing Professionals for the Possible,» and «The Social Dynamics of Education Reform»), the seventeen chapters of The Children Hurricane Katrina Left Behind discuss what is essential for rebuilding urban schools in New Orleans as well as the nation, engaging the nuanced nexus of social events and educational policy (e.g., No Child Left Behind) as it relates to the preparation of professional educators and the future of America’s schools. As Linda Darling-Hammond notes in her Foreword, each chapter speaks «powerfully and poignantly to [centuries of educational neglect and failed social policies] and to what we can and must do about it.»