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Verbal Aspect and Non-Indicative Verbs

Further Soundings in the Greek of the New Testament

Constantine R. Campbell

Constantine R. Campbell continues the work begun in his previous volume, Verbal Aspect, the Indicative Mood, and Narrative: Soundings in the Greek of the New Testament. In this book, he investigates the function of verbal aspect in non-indicative Greek verbs, which are of great significance for the translation and exegesis of Biblical texts. Campbell demonstrates that the model developed in his first volume provides strong power of explanation for the workings of non-indicative verbs, and challenges some of the conclusions reached by previous scholarship.
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Verbal Aspect, the Indicative Mood, and Narrative

Soundings in the Greek of the New Testament

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Constantine R. Campbell

Verbal aspect in Ancient Greek has been a topic of significant debate in recent scholarship. In this book, Constantine R. Campbell investigates the function of verbal aspect within New Testament Greek narrative. He argues that the primary role of verbal aspect in narrative is to delineate and shape the various ‘discourse strands’ of which it is constructed, such as mainline, offline, and direct discourse. Campbell accounts for this function in terms of the semantic value of each tense-form. Consequently, in the search for more effective conclusions and explanations, he challenges and reassesses some of the conclusions reached in previous scholarship. One such reassessment involves a boldly innovative approach to the perfect tense-form.
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The Perfect Storm

Critical Discussion of the Semantics of the Greek Perfect Tense Under Aspect Theory

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Constantine R. Campbell, Buist M. Fanning and Stanley E. Porter

Nowhere are the chaotic debates surrounding contemporary aspect theory more heated than in discussions of the theory’s application to Hellenistic Greek, and especially its understanding of the semantics of the Greek perfect tense. This book is a distilled academic debate among three of the best-known scholars on the subject, each defending his own unique interpretation while engaging the other two. The Perfect Storm will prove an indispensable resource for any scholar seeking to write convincingly on the Greek perfect in the future.