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The Gothic Language

Grammar, Genetic Provenance and Typology, Readings

Irmengard Rauch

The Gothic Language: Grammar, Genetic Provenance and Typology, Readings, now in its second edition, is designed for students and scholars of the oldest known language with a sizeable corpus, belonging to the English, German, Dutch, and Scandinavian language clade. The Gothic language is seminal to the history of the study of each of these languages. Gothic grammar is a standard text in courses on Indo-European and general linguistics since Gothic serves as the prototype Germanic language in the study of historical comparative world language typologies. Particularly pan-Germanic is the innermost core of the grammar, the genetic phonology, which is reconstructed within the most recent approaches of laryngeal and glottalic theories. Most challenging to traditional viewpoints is the total novel restructuring of Gothic synchronic phonology via current theoretical approaches such as underspecification theory and optimality theory. While the Gothic inflectional morphology is rendered in full paradigmatic display, its understanding is enhanced by the application of underspecification theory and the use of inheritance networks, a computational linguistic concept. Brief «Syntactic Considerations» concluding the grammar present a network of head-driven phrase structures. This book also brings the reader into the ambience of the fourth-century Goths. Readings from the Wulfilian Bible, the extant eight pages of the Skeireins, together with a glossary, definitions of linguistic technical terms, a bibliography, and an index complete this volume.
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Edited by Irmengard Rauch

This series invites an array of grammar types useful both as learning devices and as research tools. The freedom to break away from Latin and Greek grammar models, traditionally required, in particular of Indo-European historical languages, is respected and even urged when appropriate. On the other hand, the valuable genetic study of language should remain a sought-after, well-developed endeavor, and should not be lost to the present and future world of learning. Accordingly, the Berkeley Models of Grammars series seeks forward-looking, theoretically sophisticated methodologies which are at the same time relatively exhaustive or complete grammars of a given language at any period of its existence.
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The Old Saxon Language

Grammar, Epic Narrative, Linguistic Interference

Irmengard Rauch

This book, the first grammar of the Old Saxon language written in English, is self-contained with its inclusion of selected readings from the Heliand epic and appropriate comparative readings from two interference dialects, Old High German and Old English. It introduces the reader, regardless of degree of linguistic training, to the basic structure of a Germanic dialect. As a diachronic synchrony (variation and change within the Old Saxon time frame), The Old Saxon Language is largely dictated by cognitive strategies needed to unravel semantically a sentence or larger piece of discourse. A semantic focus pervades the entire grammar, which proceeds in the best Berkeley tradition of prompting the student to mingle intellectually with researching faculty. Thus, many of the most sophisticated research problems surrounding the study of Old Saxon are addressed.
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Edited by Irmengard Rauch

This series deals with the Old Germanic languages and literatures. Linguistic monographs should be concerned with descriptive, historical, or comparative grammar, or with etymology. Literary studies should be limited to the period from the earliest documents to approximately the beginnings of the Early Middle Ages or Middle High (Low) German periods.
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Irmengard Rauch

The Phonology / Paraphonology Interface and the Sounds of German Across Time is an excursion into the phonology of the German language in the present, the remote prehistoric past (Indo-European and Germanic), and throughout the almost thousand-year historical era. It accordingly addresses all eras pertaining to the study of the German language in its innermost core, namely, its phonology. This book makes accessible to linguists and non-linguists alike the elements of acoustic and articulatory phonetics. It provides the reader with insight into phonological methods from the Prague Structuralism and Chomskyan Generativism of the last seventy-five years to an array of today’s non-linear approaches by applying them to given phonological changes that act as leitmotifs in the research of German sounds through time. The dynamic acts that infuse the structure of German phonology, such as ablaut, umlaut, and various other assimilations, diphthongizations, monophthongizations, and consonant shifts, are all woven into the book.
In each of the three time frames, the interface with ample paraphonological data allows the reader to experience «flesh and blood» phonology, that is, how it occurs and to what purpose in the mouth / ear of the speaker / listener of the German language. Not least, the reading of a piece of literature, be it a Runic inscription, the Old High German Otfrid, a Middle High German dawn song, the Early New High German Ackermann aus Böhmen, or a Rilke poem, adds delight to the understanding of the sounds that belong to our most vital and prized human possessions.
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Irmengard Rauch

The sixteen chapters comprising this book on the Bay Area German Linguistic Fieldwork Project offer over twenty-five years of research into the changing language of native speakers and first-generation American-German speakers residing in the San Francisco Bay Area. Since 1984 the principal project investigator, Irmengard Rauch, together with students of Germanic linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, has elicited and analyzed an array of linguistic phenomena that include politically correct (PC) German, the German language of vulgarity and civility, and the grammar of e-mailing and texting German as well as that of snail-mail German. Comparison data were also gathered from Berlin in the case of the PC German and from Bonn in the case of the vulgarity/civility project. In recording the sounds of spoken German in the Bay Area, the BAG fieldworkers interviewed not only German-speaking adults but also first-generation German-speaking children (yielding a «Kinderlect») to compare with the spoken English of both of these groups. Still other studies focus on the interplay among gesture, emotion, and language; canine-human communication; the architecture of the lie; and the architecture of the apology. Chapter one details the modus operandi of the BAG research project.
This book is useful for the study of the sociolinguistics of German, English-German bilingualism, general linguistics, and the methods of linguistic fieldwork.
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Edited by Irmengard Rauch

Through the publication of ground-breaking scholarly research, this series deals with language and the multiple and varied paradigms through which it is studied. Language as viewed by linguists represents micrometa-approaches that intersect with macrometa-approaches of semiotists who understand language as an inlay to all experience. This data-based series bridges study of the sciences with that of the humanities.
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Irmengard Rauch and Gerald F. Carr

The contributions in New Insights in Germanic Linguistics III are representative of the stimulating and productive medley of offerings presented at the April 2000 meetings of the Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable. Formal syntax informs the essays of Boas, Janko, Mallen, and Roehrs, which yield evidence from German, English, Scandinavian, and Romance languages. The syntax essays of Waltz and Wilhelm deal with Old English/Latin and with Old Hittite. Phonological studies by Barrack and Goblirsch draw on Spanish, Arabic, Dutch, and Danish relative to North Frisian. While Liberman presents work on the West Germanic vocalism through time, Scheuringer concentrates on Modern German dialect reflexes of Old High German. Old Saxon serves as the database for Jeep’s study of binomials and Rauch’s pragmatic strategies. Finally, Cleek offers new North and South German fieldwork data on banking terminology.
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Irmengard Rauch and Gerald F. Carr

Fourteen papers representative of the 1996 Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable reflect the current resurgence of interest in phonological research. Interest in diachronic studies remains strong; historical research seems to be the locus for phonological studies, while syntax is pursued mainly with contemporary data. The Germanic dialects are well represented, with rich cross-linguistic evidence from non-Germanic languages. A broad array of current linguistic theories and paradigms, including the Minimalist Program, Semantic Typology, feature geometry, laboratory phonetics, and linguistic fieldwork pervade the collection.
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Irmengard Rauch and Gerald F. Carr

The fourteen essays in this volume are representative of the 1998 Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable. New Insights in Germanic Linguistics II displays a fairly equal interest in historical and contemporary language data. It is ever more evident that linguists appeal to diachronic facts when interpreting synchronic data and the reverse. A rich array of cross-linguistic evidence pervades the volume. Every component of the grammar from phonology through semantics and pragmatics is addressed and the methods applied range from laboratory phonetics to optimality theory and sociolinguistics/fieldwork.