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And This Little Piggy Had None

Challenging the Dominant Discourse on Farmed Animals in Children’s Picturebooks

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Janae Dimick

And This Little Piggy Had None: Challenging the Dominant Discourse on Farmed Animals in Children’s Picturebooks is a fascinating critique of how "farm" animals are represented in children’s literature. Drawing from the fields of critical animal studies, critical discourse analysis, and animal behavior research, Janae Dimick questions the validity of these representations as environmental, societal, and other negative effects related to factory farming emerge. Questioning the socially constructed categories that humans use to classify which animals are used for consumption and which are meant for companionship, the book works to dismantle the "truth" of what children learn from the informational texts that are read to them in educational and home settings. The first of its kind, this book will make readers question their relationship with nonhuman animals and rethink how language creates narratives that ultimately act to the detriment of humans, nature, and animals. Students studying critical pedagogy, ecolinguistics, ecopedagogy, early childhood literacy, ecocriticism, bioethics, critical animal studies, environmental studies and education, and human-animal studies would benefit from reading this easily accessible text.

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The Critical Graduate Experience

An Ethics of Higher Education Responsibilities

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Charlotte Achieng-Evensen, Janae Dimick, Ndindi Kitonga, Maryann Krikorian, Kevin Stockbridge and Barry Kanpol

The Critical Graduate Experience is a collection of scholarly reflections on the possibilities of a new vision for critical studies. It is a remarkable book that provides daring analyses from the vantage of the graduate student experience. Drawing from individual knowledge and research, the authors invite you to re-imagine education for justice. Barry Kanpol opens the work with a brilliant meditation on joy and cynicism in university classrooms and educational theory. The book continues to unfold as an open and honest conversation with doctoral students and recent graduates concerning the ethics of higher education. In a true critical approach, each chapter problematizes a new facet of academic assumptions and practices as they touch the lives of students. The authors explore the ethical implications of acknowledging student spirituality and expanding the role of critical education studies. The book concludes with a transparent self-critique on the process and ethics of graduate students writing for publication. This is a wonderful text, guiding students and professors as they enter into dialogue on the ethics of an authentic critical education studies. Classes on practical ethics, educational spirituality, student voice, collaborative publishing, and critical pedagogy could benefit from the insights offered here. Daring to believe that student experience and knowledge have a place in the world of academic publishing, this book is both a prophetic proclamation of and humble invitation to a new future in the field.