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  • Author or Editor: Michal Nowosielski x
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Polish Organisations in Germany

Their Present Status and Needs

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Michal Nowosielski

Although the Polish immigrant movement in Germany has existed for more than 150 years, this fact is not reflected in the shape or standing of contemporary organisations. The history of Polish associations in Germany is an example that demonstrates, on the one hand, growth and expansion, and on the other, the weakening and decay of an immigrant organisation movement. «Polish Organisations in Germany: Their Present Status and Needs» is intended to fill, to a certain extent, the gaps in the sociological literature on Polish organisations in Germany. It aims at describing the situations in which nongovernmental organizations that associate Poles residing in Germany find themselves: their number, their number of members, the fields and range covered by their activities, their financial standing, their level of organization, their relations with the Polish and German authorities, etc.
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(Post)transformational Migration

Inequalities, Welfare State, and Horizontal Mobility

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Edited by Marek Nowak and Michal Nowosielski

Perceived inequalities, such as the lack of a proper job or bad living conditions, can play the role of push factors that make people migrate. Apart from this, there are studies which focus more on relative deprivation, exacerbated by inequality, as a basic determinant of people’s mobility, and also some are focused on the influence of income inequality on migration. Such «structural conditions» are only a part of the story of migration, particularly because differences and inequalities are social facts, elements of the universal shape of modern open societies. Ultimately inequality, as more general departure point, can’t be merely an element of explanation, and it is important to remember that not only do «objective» social differences and the inequalities caused by them foster migration behaviour, but so do their social perceptions.