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  • Author or Editor: Mirosław Kocur x
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Mirosław Kocur

This book presents an interdisciplinary investigation into the emergence of the actor and theater. Scholarship helps us to realize how we have evolved to who we are today and to understand the transformative power of performance. The author proposes to boost and advance theater studies by reviewing new research in anthropology, archaeology, paleoanthropology, classics, ethnography, physics, cognitive science, neuroscience, theater anthropology and performance studies. Referring to his fieldwork in Bali and Tibet, and to his professional experience in theater, the author explains the role of bipedality, toolmaking and trance in the evolution of the performer, examines the performativity of space and writing, and argues that ancient culture emerged from dance.
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The Power of Theater

Actors and Spectators in Ancient Rome

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Miroslaw Kocur

This book examines performative practices of the ancient Romans, and provides fresh insights into the contexts of the Roman theater. Today the ancient theater is associated more with Greece than with Rome. However, the Romans went to the theater more often than the Athenians. In fact, the entire Eternal City was a vast stage for numerous performances not just by politicians, leaders, orators, and emperors, but also by common citizens. The author suggests that we look at Rome as a theater, one in which everybody, depending on circumstances, could be a performer. This book reconstructs the art of the Roman spectacle, and – based on detailed analyses of rich and varied source materials – extensively discusses the behavior of audiences and the little-known practices of actors, such as the performers of Atellan farces, pantomimes, and mimes. The reader also gains an insight into the most recent research on the Roman theater.

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The Second Birth of Theatre

Performances of Anglo-Saxon Monks

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Mirosław Kocur

This book presents a new approach to early English theatre by exposing a genuine relationship between monastic performances and theatricality. It argues that modern theatre was reinvented in Anglo-Saxon monasteries by monks who were required to transform themselves by disciplining their bodies and performing complex religious acts. After extensively surveying the monastic and liturgical sources of theatre the author reconstructs the XII-century staging of the Anglo-Norman «Ordo representacionis Ade» and demonstrates the fundamental incongruity between the ancient and Christian performativity. On a more personal note he concludes with comments on references to the monastic rule in «Performer», a programmatic text by Jerzy Grotowski.

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Interdisciplinary Studies in Performance

Historical Narratives. Theater. Public Life

Edited by Mirosław Kocur

The series aims at presenting innovative cross-disciplinary and intercultural research in performance practice and theory. Its mission is to expand and enrich performance studies with new research in theatre, film, dance, ritual and art. It also draws on queer and gender studies, anthropology, linguistics, archeaology, ethnography, sociology, history, media and political sciences, and even medicine and biology. The series focuses on promoting groundbreaking methodologies and new directions in studying performative culture by scrutinizing its transformative and transgressive aspects. The series Interdisciplinary Studies in Performance publishes in English and German.
Volumes may be monographs as well as thematic collections of papers by scholars from Poland and from abroad.
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Die Praxis der/des Echo

Zum Theater des Widerhalls

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Edited by Veronika Darian, Micha Braun, Jeanne Bindernagel and Miroslaw Kocur

Der Band versammelt Lektüren gegenwärtiger und historischer Konstellationen in Theater, Text und Kunst, die Echo als Figur und Phänomen nachspüren. Im antiken Mythos ist die Nymphe Echo zur ohnmächtigen Wiederholung fremder Rede verdammt. Sie wird zum Sinnbild eines defizitären, vom Anderen abhängigen Wesens. Doch birgt der Widerhall mehr in sich, verweist er doch auf das widerständige Moment einer Zergliederung jedes «eigentlichen» Ausdrucks. Echos körperlose Stimme gemahnt an die Medialität der Kommunikation, das Entgleiten des Sinns, die Grenzen der Mitteilbarkeit und die Ambivalenzen einer Aneignung der Vergangenheit. Damit aber wohnt ihr ein entschieden theatrales Element inne. Echo wird als eigene Praxis wirksam.