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Richard D'Alquen

The accepted change from movable pitch accent to fixed dynamic accent in Germanic is so substantial that it must have been multi-staged. The author posits stages, using acoustic phonetics, Verner's Law and accent markings in Old High German. He tests his theory in all major areas of Germanic grammar. Many old problems receive more convincing solutions, even Germanic finals and Scandinavian accent 2.
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Richard D'Alquen

A wide-ranging appreciation of tense scholarship precedes a new analysis of tense that reverses the trend to marginalize time but without reverting to the oversimplified concepts of earlier decades. The use of implicature allows the present and future tenses to be seen as having complementary primary time ranges together with complementary modalities in the secondary time ranges. The age-old problem of the choice between perfect and preterite is illuminated historically as a conflict of sub-systems within the standard language. A postscript on the subjunctive rounds off this semantic analysis of German tense forms.