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Racial Reconciliation

Black Masculinity, Societal Indifference, and Church Socialization

Steven Randolph Cureton

Racial Reconciliation: Black Masculinity, Societal Indifference, and Church Socialization pursues the deconstruction and construction of black masculinity. This book is partly exploratory in that it presents an abundance of profound quotes from historical and contemporary blacks who have a vested interest in race relations. It could be that the United States of America has not been ready to be receptive to the idea that blacks not only can recognize their own oppression but also can articulate with accuracy the human nature of the oppressor. This book aims to directly confront the nature and extent of racism and discrimination in an era that boasts about racial progress and a similar era whereby modern day churches perceive themselves as beacons of morality and racial harmony.

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Steven Randolph Cureton

The Social Construction of Black Masculinity examines the legacy of negotiating black masculinity in a relatively free society that forced black men to justify claims of equitable humanity. The book represents an unapologetic narrative about behavioral choices by black men, which were framed by a history of forced distancing from their covenant with God, deliberate character assassinations, and emasculation in plain sight of their women and children.

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Steven Randolph Cureton

Black women are long overdue for proper recognition as primary love interests and researchers who are so inclined must do a better job of uncovering examples of black men who proclaim black women as more than a default companion. A primary objective of this book is to examine love letters, civil rights pursuits, and interpersonal relations amongst prominent liberation icons. Additionally, exploring colorism, black power, nihilism, race manners, race matters, black feminism, secular verification of spirituality and racial casting will hopefully provide insight concerning whether black-on-black love is a survival type of love. This is attractive for any undergraduate and graduate level courses seeking to understand the nature of the black experience in America. Moreover, this book is intended to reach audiences interested in the real thin line between love and hate amongst black men and black women.