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  • Author or Editor: Venus E. Evans-Winters x
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Teaching Black Girls

Resiliency in Urban Classrooms

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Venus E. Evans-Winters

In this updated volume of Teaching Black Girls: Resiliency in Urban Classrooms, Venus E. Evans-Winters uses qualitative research methods to interpret and discuss school resilience in the lives of African American female students. The book demonstrates how these girls are simultaneously one of the most vulnerable, and one of the most resilient group of students. Teaching Black Girls implements alternative approaches to the study of the intersection of race, class, and gender on schooling, deliberately highlighting how students growing up and attending schools in urban neighborhoods are educationally resilient in the face of adversity. Through dialogue and self-reflection, the author and participants in the ethnographic study documented here reconstruct and tell stories of resilience to derive practice that is both gender and culturally relevant. Teaching Black Girls has research and practice implications for graduate students, advanced pre-service teachers, and school practitioners.
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Edited by Venus E. Evans-Winters

With more attention being directed toward adolescent girls' and young women’s educational development and human rights across the globe, urban girls as an educationally and politically disenfranchised group are becoming more of the primary focus of educational, sociological, and psychological research and discourse. There is a need for theory, inquiry, and praxis that considers the dynamics of the interactions of race, class, gender, age, and spatial location on youth education and overall socio-emotional development. The social and cultural context of where students learn, play, and work significantly shape youth's identities and agency. Similarly, gender plays an important role on students’ academic and social development. The Urban Girls series brings scholarly attention to the unique, yet diverse, cultural experiences and identities of adolescent girls and young women being socialized in urban contexts. Authors explore and theorize how young women's racialized and gendered experiences in their families, communities, and schools and larger social contexts foster agency, resilience, and resistance. Proposals for this series can be emailed to Series Editor Venus Evans-Winters at vevansw@ilstu.edu.

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Black Feminism in Education

Black Women Speak Back, Up, and Out

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Edited by Venus E. Evans-Winters and Bettina L. Love

In Black Feminism in Education: Black Women Speak Back, Up, and Out, authors use an endarkened feminist lens to share the ways in which they have learned to resist, adapt, and re-conceptualize education research, teaching, and learning in ways that serve the individual, community, nation, and all of humanity. Chapters explore and discuss the following question: How is Black feminist thought and/or an endarkened feminist epistemology (EFE) being used in pre-K through higher education contexts and scholarship to marshal new research methodologies, frameworks, and pedagogies? At the intersection of race, class, and gender, the book draws upon alternative research methodologies and pedagogies that are possibly transformative and healing for all involved in the research, teaching, and service experience. The volume is useful for those interested in women and gender studies, research methods, and cultural studies.
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Edited by M. Billye Sankofa Waters, Venus E. Evans-Winters and Bettina L. Love

The album The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill sold over 420,000 copies in its first week, received ten Grammy nominations (winning five). Celebrating Twenty Years of Black Girlhood: The Lauryn Hill Reader critically engages the work of Ms. Hill, highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the album. Beyond the album’s commercial success, Ms. Hill’s radical self-consciousness and exuberance for life led listeners through her Black girl journey of love, motherhood, admonition, redemption, spirituality, sexuality, politics, and nostalgia that affirmed the power of creativity, resistance, and the tradition of African storytelling. Ms. Hill’s album provides inspirational energies that serve as a foundational text for Black girlhood. In many ways it is the definitive work of Black girlhood for the Hip Hop generation and beyond because it opened our eyes to a holistic narrative of woman and mother. Twenty years after the release of the album, we pay tribute to this work by adding to the quilt of Black girls’ stories with the threads of feminist consciousness, which are particularly imperative in this space where we declare: Black girls matter.

Celebrating Twenty Years of Black Girlhood is the first book to academically engage the work of the incomparable Ms. Hill. It intellectually wrestles with the interdisciplinary nature of Ms. Hill’s album, centering the connection between the music of Ms. Hill and the lives of Black girls. The essays in this collection utilize personal narratives and professional pedagogies and invite students, scholars, and readers to reflect on how Ms. Hill’s album influenced their past, present, and future.