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Curriculum

A River Runs Through It

William M. Reynolds

Curriculum: A River Runs Through It is a collection of William M. Reynolds’ essays from 1982-2002. These essays explore curriculum theory from hermeneutics and phenomenology to poststructuralism. There is a pervasive thematic force that flows through the author’s work: a persistent voice desiring change in the ways we school our children and conceptualize curriculum. It is a voice that questions what is taken for granted and does so in a manner rich with possibilities for those facing the lived experience of schools every day.
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Reading Curriculum Theory

The Development of a New Hermeneutic

William M. Reynolds

Reading Curriculum Theory: The Development of a New Hermeneutic is a study of curriculum theory texts of the 1980s. Focusing on three divisions within the theoretical traditions of the field; the conservative, the reconceptualist and the reproductionist, the book provides a hermeneutic reading of specific texts within each tradition. The book relies heavily upon the interpretation theory of Paul Ricoeur and discusses Ricoeur's theoretical works. The book reveals and demonstrates that the ultimate aim of interpretive reading or the hermeneutic process is enhanced self understanding.
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a curriculum of place

Understandings Emerging through the Southern Mist

William M. Reynolds

Since the United States has gone South in a number of respects, it is crucial to our understandings of ourselves and our current milieu to peer through the mist that covers the intricacies of the culture and history of the South. A Curriculum of Place: Understandings Emerging through the Southern Mist presents new and provocative insights into the study of curriculum and place focusing on the South. The essays emphasize understanding the importance of Southern place politically, educationally, and experientially. Southern place is studied autobiographically, historically, and educationally through the lenses of race, class, gender, sexuality, and social justice. Questions are raised concerning the effects of place on the development of Southern identity, educational dispositions, popular culture, politics, and other issues. Ultimately this book affirms the importance of the study of place in contemporary discussions of culture and curriculum.
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Edited by William M. Reynolds

Critical Studies of Southern Place: A Reader critically investigates and informs the construction of Southernness, Southern identity, and the South past and present. It promotes and expands the notion of a Southern epistemology. Authors from across the South write about such diverse topics as Southern working-class culture; LGBT issues in the South; Southern music; Southern reality television; race and ethnicity in the South; religion in the South; sports in the South; and Southernness. How do these multiple interpretations of popular culture within critical conceptualizations of place enhance our understandings of education? Critical Studies of Southern Place investigates the connections between the critical examination of place-specific culture and its multiple connections with education and pedagogy. This important book fills a significant gap in the scholarly work on the ramifications of place. Readers will be able to center the importance of place in their own scholarship and cultural work as well as be able to think deeply about how Southern place affects us all.
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Forgotten Places

Critical Studies in Rural Education

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Edited by William M. Reynolds

Forgotten Places: Critical Studies in Rural Education critically investigates and informs the construction of the rural, rural identity and the understanding of the rural internationally. This book promotes and expands the notion of critical understandings of rural education, particularly in the areas of race, class, gender, and LGBTQ, with conceptualizations of social justice. While there have been many volumes written on critical issues in urban education, only a small number have been produced on rural education, and the majority of those are not critical. By contrast, Forgotten Places not only discusses "schools in the country," but also expands conceptualizations of the rural beyond schools and place as well as beyond the borders of the United States. It also tackles the artificial duality between conceptualizations of urban and rural. Forgotten Places includes scholarly investigations into the connections among the symbolic order, various forms of cultural artifacts and multiple readings of these artifacts within the context of critical/transformational pedagogy. This book fills a significant gap in the scholarly work on the ramifications of the rural.

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Understanding Curriculum

Fifth Printing

William F. Pinar, William M. Reynolds, Patrick Slattery and Peter M. Taubman

Perhaps not since Ralph Tyler’s (1949) Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction has a book communicated the field as completely as Understanding Curriculum. From historical discourses to breaking developments in feminist, poststructuralist, and racial theory, including chapters on political theory, phenomenology, aesthetics, theology, international developments, and a lengthy chapter on institutional concerns, the American curriculum field is here. It will be an indispensable textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses alike.