Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Wolff-Michael Roth x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Curriculum*-in-the-Making

A Post-constructivist Perspective

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth

Curriculum*-in-the-Making theorizes about the living curriculum as an event that is in the making, for the enacted curriculum is something finished, which, only as an object, can be compared to another object. A living curriculum, understood as an event*-in-the-making, leads to a very different appreciation of just what is happening in a classroom. Events* are understood to be in the making so we cannot know the precise nature of what we witness until after completion has been achieved. This book uses lesson fragments to develop a post-constructivist perspective on curriculum that is grounded in a phenomenological approach concerned with understanding the never-ending movement of life. This leads to radically different forms of understanding of curriculum issues such as the subject, ethics, the role of passibility and passivity, the nature of the response, and the learning paradox.
Restricted access

At the Elbow of Another

Learning to Teach by Coteaching

Wolff-Michael Roth and Kenneth Tobin

At the Elbow of Another is about teaching and learning to teach, written from the perspectives and experiences of two educators who teach and, in so doing, learn to teach. Teaching and learning to teach at the elbows of other teachers (including ourselves) provide us with new and different understandings and allow us to describe a different epistemology of teaching. We adopt a first-person perspective on teaching, sometimes our own and at other times that of peers but through the eyes of coparticipants engaged in an activity with the same primary intention of assisting students to learn. Throughout this book, we focus on teaching and learning to teach at different stages of the career ladder and explore different ways of conceiving the roles of researchers, supervisors, evaluators, cooperating teachers, and «new teachers.»
Restricted access

Wolff-Michael Roth and Jacques Desautels

Science Education as/for Sociopolitical Action is about alternative ways of looking at science education. Rather than focusing on the transfer or construction of knowledge, the authors focus on the role of science education as a starting point for engaging students in social action. Sometimes, social action is the starting point and students learn science and about science as they pursue their goals. The authors provide concrete descriptions for curriculum design, or how an alternative curriculum design has worked in practice. This book shows that science education can be radically different from current practice without losing its appeal.
Restricted access

Wolff-Michael Roth and Kenneth Tobin

Coteaching and cogenerative dialoguing are ways of learning to teach that truly bridge the gap between theory and praxis, as new teachers learn to teach alongside peers and more experienced teachers. These practices are also means of overcoming teacher isolation and burnout. Through cogenerative dialogue sessions, new and experienced teachers, university supervisors, researchers, and administrators are able to create local theory for the purpose of improving teaching and learning. In this book, contributors from four countries report on how coteaching and cogenerative dialoguing worked in their situation.
Restricted access

Wolff-Michael Roth, Kenneth Tobin and Steve Ritchie

Re/Constructing Elementary Science seeks to improve the way science is taught in the elementary school. There are three main contradictions that make it difficult for teachers and students to engage in meaningful activities from which understandings result. The central issues in this book are framed in terms of three dichotomies that lead to tensions arising from the dialectic of opposing aspects of teaching and learning. First, there is a tension between learning as an individual process (cultural production) and as a cultural process (cultural reproduction). Second, there is a tension between science and technology (applied science). Finally, there exists a tension between children’s interaction with nature and their language for describing and explaining nature. Exemplary case studies are featured that show the tremendous capabilities of elementary students to talk about technology and, in the process, to learn to talk science. These case studies are couched in an ongoing professional dialogue among the authors and the requirements to make such exemplary science happen in other classrooms.