Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Yusef Waghid x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Yusef Waghid

The achievement of democratic forms of government ranging from liberal to communitarian strands has been a major priority for developing countries in their post-colonial histories. South Africa’s quest to establish a multi-party democratic system of government has been influenced by liberal and communitarian perspectives of democracy. Yet, the attainment of democracy in South Africa has not been without contradictions, particularly related to majority rule, equality of opportunity, and rights. This book reconstructs a conception of deliberative democracy which can create possibilities for a developing country to deal more adequately with majoritarianism, equalising opportunities, and rights. It makes an argument for a rational, reflexive discourse-oriented procedure of deliberative democracy which cultivates a form of citizenship that recognises the need for citizens to care, reason and engage justly in political conversation with others.
Restricted access

Conceptions of Islamic Education

Pedagogical Framings

Yusef Waghid

Conceptions of Islamic Education: Pedagogical Framings argues that madāris (Muslim schools) cannot exclusively be held responsible for the cultivation of extremism. Islamic education can most appropriately be framed according to three interrelated concepts: tarbiyyah (rearing or nurturing), ta‘līm (learning/ instruction), and ta’dīb (good action). These three phenomena are explored along the lines of a minimalist-maximalist continuum that guides practices and institutions differently. A minimalist understanding of Islamic education does not necessarily produce uncritical citizens, but a maximalist understanding engenders an ethical democratic community and cosmopolitan beings concerned about their responsibility towards others. By looking specifically at South African Muslim schools, Conceptions of Islamic Education undermines the misconception that such schools perpetuate Islamic radicalism.
Restricted access

Series:

Yusef Waghid and Nuraan Davids

Education, Assessment, and the Desire for Dissonance aims to address the contentious practice of assessment in schools and universities within a poststructuralist educational paradigm. Within the theoretical paradigm of Foucault’s (1994) notions of governmentality, subjectification and dissonance, the book examines why, through which and in which ways (how) educational assessment should unfold considering the challenges of globalized and cosmopolitan dimensions of educational change that have beset educational institutions. Waghid and Davids show how conceptual derivatives of Foucauldian governmentality, in particular the notions of power, panopticon and surveillance, dispositive, freedom and resistance—as relational concepts—affect assessment in universities and schools. The authors argue why universities and schools cannot be complacent or non-responsive to current understandings and practices of assessment. In the main, the authors contend that a Foucauldian notion of powerful, subjectified and dissonant assessment can, firstly, be extended to an Agambenian (2011) notion of a profane, denudified and rhythmic form of assessment; and secondly, be enhanced by a Derridian (1997) idea of friendship that bridges a Foucauldian view of governmental assessment with an Agambenian view of ethical assessment. Friendship allows people to act responsibly towards one another—that is, teachers and students acting responsibility towards one another—and resonates with an ongoing pursuit of rhythmic assessment practices. Such a form of assessment opens up an attentiveness to the incalculable and unexpected encounters that bear the responsibility of acting with one another. The authors conclude that an assessment with teaching and learning can transcend the limitations of an assessment of learning and an assessment for learning.