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Marion Kraft

Starting from the principle of the African continuum and based on concepts of an afrocentric feminist epistemology, this study traces back African cultural traditions and narrative strategies in works by African American women writers. It examines the inscription of the Black woman's voice into the Western text and analyses conceptions of female bonding, flexible gender roles, matrilineal myths and legends, trickster figures, folktales, tonal language and double-voiced structures of address as constituting elements in the development of a specific literary canon of women writers of the African diaspora in the USA. Focusing on these textual politics, the study aims at contributing to the ongoing discourse on Black feminist aesthetics.
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Reading Contemporary African American Drama

Fragments of History, Fragments of Self

Trudier Harris and Jennifer Larson

Contemporary African American dramatists such as Amiri Baraka, James Baldwin, August Wilson, and Suzan-Lori Parks as well as Lorraine Hansberry, Alice Childress, and Pearl Cleage find their creative inspiration in historical events from slavery to the civil rights movement. From the Emmett Till-inspired character in Baldwin’s Blues for Mister Charlie to Parks’s recreation of Lincoln and Booth, these playwrights show that history is the mirror that shapes the identities of African American writers and characters.
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Gunilla Florby, Mark Shackleton and Katri Suhonen

Has Canada moved beyond the nation state into the world of the post-national? To what extent have fixed notions of Canadian nationhood been replaced by a more global, decentralized sense of identification? Is nationhood (or post-nationhood) best expressed by statelessness and exile or by belonging? Or can Canadian national identity in fact fruitfully coexist with the post-national consciousness? These are some of the issues covered by this volume, issues seen from a range of perspectives – literary, cultural, political and economic. In the literary sphere the national/post-national debate is explored both through canonical writers, such as L. M. Montgomery, Stephen Leacock, and Marie-Claire Blais, and through recent First Nations, Asian-Canadian, African-Canadian, Ukrainian-Canadian and Quebec writing. The political and economic range is equally diverse, covering such topics as immigration policy, multiculturalism, Canadian-American relations, tourist imaginings of the Canadian North, the Canadian city, and Quebec nationalism. The book brings together 27 original articles from international scholars and creative writers, offering both European and Canadian perspectives. Six articles in French focus specifically on the francophone sphere.